3 Specify which keyboard type the shortcut applies to (it doesn't apply to e.g. French keyboards)
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As a web developer I frequently use angle brackets in markup. The World Wide Web Consortium is the standards organization for HTML, and in their recommendation for HTML 5, they refer specifically to Unicode character 003C:

The first character of a start tag must be a "<" (U+003C) character.

003C is generally the character produced from the keyboard (shift + comma on a US keyboard). (You can produce all the other pointy-arrow characters from the keyboard; most of them are just further away.) The Unicode standard labels this character as the LESS-THAN SIGN.

However, in practice these characters are referred to as angle brackets:

The following code fails because the opening tag is missing an angle bracket, and the intended boundary of the tag is unclear.

You can also refer to them in context as opening and closing brackets:

Opening and closing tags that are missing the opening < and closing > brackets.

My hope here is to provide some context to what I believe to be the most common case.

As a web developer I frequently use angle brackets in markup. The World Wide Web Consortium is the standards organization for HTML, and in their recommendation for HTML 5, they refer specifically to Unicode character 003C:

The first character of a start tag must be a "<" (U+003C) character.

003C is generally the character produced from the keyboard (shift + comma). (You can produce all the other pointy-arrow characters from the keyboard; most of them are just further away.) The Unicode standard labels this character as the LESS-THAN SIGN.

However, in practice these characters are referred to as angle brackets:

The following code fails because the opening tag is missing an angle bracket, and the intended boundary of the tag is unclear.

You can also refer to them in context as opening and closing brackets:

Opening and closing tags that are missing the opening < and closing > brackets.

My hope here is to provide some context to what I believe to be the most common case.

As a web developer I frequently use angle brackets in markup. The World Wide Web Consortium is the standards organization for HTML, and in their recommendation for HTML 5, they refer specifically to Unicode character 003C:

The first character of a start tag must be a "<" (U+003C) character.

003C is generally the character produced from the keyboard (shift + comma on a US keyboard). (You can produce all the other pointy-arrow characters from the keyboard; most of them are just further away.) The Unicode standard labels this character as the LESS-THAN SIGN.

However, in practice these characters are referred to as angle brackets:

The following code fails because the opening tag is missing an angle bracket, and the intended boundary of the tag is unclear.

You can also refer to them in context as opening and closing brackets:

Opening and closing tags that are missing the opening < and closing > brackets.

My hope here is to provide some context to what I believe to be the most common case.

2 edited body
source | link

As a web developer I frequently use angle brackets in markup. The World Wide Web Consortium is the standards organization for HTML, and in their recommendation for HTML 5in their recommendation for HTML 5, they refer specifically to Unicode character 003C:

The first character of a start tag must be a "<" (U+003C) character.

003C is generally the character produced from the keyboard (shift + comma). (You can produce all the other pointy-arrow characters from the keyboard; most of them are just further away.) The Unicode standard labels this character as the LESS-THAN SIGN.

However, in practice these characters are referred to as angle brackets:

The following code fails because the opening tag is missing an angle bracket, and the intended boundary of the tag is unclear.

You can also refer to them in context as opening and closing brackets:

Opening and closing tags that are missing the opening < and closing > brackets.

My hope here is to provide some context to what I believe to be the most common case.

As a web developer I frequently use angle brackets in markup. The World Wide Web Consortium is the standards organization for HTML, and in their recommendation for HTML 5, they refer specifically to Unicode character 003C:

The first character of a start tag must be a "<" (U+003C) character.

003C is generally the character produced from the keyboard (shift + comma). (You can produce all the other pointy-arrow characters from the keyboard; most of them are just further away.) The Unicode standard labels this character as the LESS-THAN SIGN.

However, in practice these characters are referred to as angle brackets:

The following code fails because the opening tag is missing an angle bracket, and the intended boundary of the tag is unclear.

You can also refer to them in context as opening and closing brackets:

Opening and closing tags that are missing the opening < and closing > brackets.

My hope here is to provide some context to what I believe to be the most common case.

As a web developer I frequently use angle brackets in markup. The World Wide Web Consortium is the standards organization for HTML, and in their recommendation for HTML 5, they refer specifically to Unicode character 003C:

The first character of a start tag must be a "<" (U+003C) character.

003C is generally the character produced from the keyboard (shift + comma). (You can produce all the other pointy-arrow characters from the keyboard; most of them are just further away.) The Unicode standard labels this character as the LESS-THAN SIGN.

However, in practice these characters are referred to as angle brackets:

The following code fails because the opening tag is missing an angle bracket, and the intended boundary of the tag is unclear.

You can also refer to them in context as opening and closing brackets:

Opening and closing tags that are missing the opening < and closing > brackets.

My hope here is to provide some context to what I believe to be the most common case.

1
source | link

As a web developer I frequently use angle brackets in markup. The World Wide Web Consortium is the standards organization for HTML, and in their recommendation for HTML 5, they refer specifically to Unicode character 003C:

The first character of a start tag must be a "<" (U+003C) character.

003C is generally the character produced from the keyboard (shift + comma). (You can produce all the other pointy-arrow characters from the keyboard; most of them are just further away.) The Unicode standard labels this character as the LESS-THAN SIGN.

However, in practice these characters are referred to as angle brackets:

The following code fails because the opening tag is missing an angle bracket, and the intended boundary of the tag is unclear.

You can also refer to them in context as opening and closing brackets:

Opening and closing tags that are missing the opening < and closing > brackets.

My hope here is to provide some context to what I believe to be the most common case.