3 Added three early instances of "play[ing] a blinder".
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By way of corroborating the answers that have already been submitted, I note that John Ayto, Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms, third edition (2009), has this entry for "play a blinder":

play a blinder perform very well informal

Dating from the 1950s, blinder is a colloquial term for 'dazzlingly good piece of play' in sport, especially in rugby or cricket.

[Example:] 2001 Sun Gilles will start and I would just love him to play a blinder and score a couple of goals to knock Southampton out of the cup.

However, the expression appears to be considerably older than the 1950s. Although I don't have a subscription to the British Newspaper Archive site—and so can't see the image of the original articles—I have reconstructed three early newspaper references to "play a blinder" from snippet quotations from that archive. There are undoubtedly others as well.

From "Gleanings ..." in the Lancashire [England] Evening Post (November 1, 1919) [combined snippets]:

... Ephraim Liverpool captain, who played a blinder at Burnley last week, says a capable, homely footballer who could take a handful of boys and coach them would be worth his weight in gold if ...

From "We Would Like to Know," in the [Yorkshire, England] Star Green 'un (February 11, 1928) [combined snippets; some of the wording clearly incomplete or inaccurate]:

What is the attraction at Handsworth for a number of Bible Class and Sunday School League players? Who was the Adults Leaguer who "told off" for letting two of his men help the first team? And the player a Rotherham team the goal nets would keep the rain off? Who was the outside left of a Rotherham team who had a good day last Saturday? Apart from playing a "blinder" scored two goals and won thirty bob in a butter?

From "Saved Two Penalties" in the Belfast [Northern Ireland] Telegraph (November 1933) [combined snippets]:

The well-known sporting phrase 'horses for courses' aptly applies to Percy Hackworth, who signed for Olentoran last week. Every time he is opposed to Dulimurry, Percy is sure to play a blinder. Besides saving two penalties for the Glens 11 ...

It thus appears that standout British athletes have been credited with playing blinders for a century or more.

By way of corroborating the answers that have already been submitted, I note that John Ayto, Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms, third edition (2009), has this entry for "play a blinder":

play a blinder perform very well informal

Dating from the 1950s, blinder is a colloquial term for 'dazzlingly good piece of play' in sport, especially in rugby or cricket.

[Example:] 2001 Sun Gilles will start and I would just love him to play a blinder and score a couple of goals to knock Southampton out of the cup.

John Ayto, Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms, third edition (2009), has this entry for "play a blinder":

play a blinder perform very well informal

Dating from the 1950s, blinder is a colloquial term for 'dazzlingly good piece of play' in sport, especially in rugby or cricket.

[Example:] 2001 Sun Gilles will start and I would just love him to play a blinder and score a couple of goals to knock Southampton out of the cup.

However, the expression appears to be considerably older than the 1950s. Although I don't have a subscription to the British Newspaper Archive site—and so can't see the image of the original articles—I have reconstructed three early newspaper references to "play a blinder" from snippet quotations from that archive. There are undoubtedly others as well.

From "Gleanings ..." in the Lancashire [England] Evening Post (November 1, 1919) [combined snippets]:

... Ephraim Liverpool captain, who played a blinder at Burnley last week, says a capable, homely footballer who could take a handful of boys and coach them would be worth his weight in gold if ...

From "We Would Like to Know," in the [Yorkshire, England] Star Green 'un (February 11, 1928) [combined snippets; some of the wording clearly incomplete or inaccurate]:

What is the attraction at Handsworth for a number of Bible Class and Sunday School League players? Who was the Adults Leaguer who "told off" for letting two of his men help the first team? And the player a Rotherham team the goal nets would keep the rain off? Who was the outside left of a Rotherham team who had a good day last Saturday? Apart from playing a "blinder" scored two goals and won thirty bob in a butter?

From "Saved Two Penalties" in the Belfast [Northern Ireland] Telegraph (November 1933) [combined snippets]:

The well-known sporting phrase 'horses for courses' aptly applies to Percy Hackworth, who signed for Olentoran last week. Every time he is opposed to Dulimurry, Percy is sure to play a blinder. Besides saving two penalties for the Glens 11 ...

It thus appears that standout British athletes have been credited with playing blinders for a century or more.

2 Fixed a typo: 'jut' --> 'just'.
source | link

By way of corroborating the answers that have already been submitted, I note that John Ayto, Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms, third edition (2009), has this entry for "play a blinder":

play a blinder perform very well informal

Dating from the 1950s, blinder is a colloquial term for 'dazzlingly good piece of play' in sport, especially in rugby or cricket.

[Example:] 2001 Sun Gilles will start and I would jutjust love him to play a blinder and score a couple of goals to knock Southampton out of the cup.

By way of corroborating the answers that have already been submitted, I note that John Ayto, Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms, third edition (2009), has this entry for "play a blinder":

play a blinder perform very well informal

Dating from the 1950s, blinder is a colloquial term for 'dazzlingly good piece of play' in sport, especially in rugby or cricket.

[Example:] 2001 Sun Gilles will start and I would jut love him to play a blinder and score a couple of goals to knock Southampton out of the cup.

By way of corroborating the answers that have already been submitted, I note that John Ayto, Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms, third edition (2009), has this entry for "play a blinder":

play a blinder perform very well informal

Dating from the 1950s, blinder is a colloquial term for 'dazzlingly good piece of play' in sport, especially in rugby or cricket.

[Example:] 2001 Sun Gilles will start and I would just love him to play a blinder and score a couple of goals to knock Southampton out of the cup.

1
source | link

By way of corroborating the answers that have already been submitted, I note that John Ayto, Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms, third edition (2009), has this entry for "play a blinder":

play a blinder perform very well informal

Dating from the 1950s, blinder is a colloquial term for 'dazzlingly good piece of play' in sport, especially in rugby or cricket.

[Example:] 2001 Sun Gilles will start and I would jut love him to play a blinder and score a couple of goals to knock Southampton out of the cup.