3 inserted wiki link to 'person of interest' as used by law enforcement
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How about Person Of Interest?

This could be a playful and vague way to describe someone that you are romantically interested in. In the US, the police use this term to describe someone involved or connected to a criminal investigation, but there is not yet enough evidence to arrest them.In the US, the police use this term to describe someone involved or connected to a criminal investigation, but there is not yet enough evidence to arrest them.

You could keep the legal metaphor running thusly:

"Hey, who's that guy you came here with? Is he your boyfriend?"

"John? He's a person of interest. We had some fun last weekend, but the jury's still out."

How about Person Of Interest?

This could be a playful and vague way to describe someone that you are romantically interested in. In the US, the police use this term to describe someone involved or connected to a criminal investigation, but there is not yet enough evidence to arrest them.

You could keep the legal metaphor running thusly:

"Hey, who's that guy you came here with? Is he your boyfriend?"

"John? He's a person of interest. We had some fun last weekend, but the jury's still out."

How about Person Of Interest?

This could be a playful and vague way to describe someone that you are romantically interested in. In the US, the police use this term to describe someone involved or connected to a criminal investigation, but there is not yet enough evidence to arrest them.

You could keep the legal metaphor running thusly:

"Hey, who's that guy you came here with? Is he your boyfriend?"

"John? He's a person of interest. We had some fun last weekend, but the jury's still out."

2 added 477 characters in body
source | link

How about Person Of Interest?

This could be a playful and vague way to describe someone that you are romantically interested in. In the US, the police use this term to describe someone involved or connected to a criminal investigation, but there is not yet enough evidence to arrest them.

You could keep the legal metaphor running thusly:

"Hey, who's that guy you came here with? Is he your boyfriend?"

"John? He's a person of interest. We had some fun last weekend, but the jury's still out."

How about Person Of Interest?

How about Person Of Interest?

This could be a playful and vague way to describe someone that you are romantically interested in. In the US, the police use this term to describe someone involved or connected to a criminal investigation, but there is not yet enough evidence to arrest them.

You could keep the legal metaphor running thusly:

"Hey, who's that guy you came here with? Is he your boyfriend?"

"John? He's a person of interest. We had some fun last weekend, but the jury's still out."

1
source | link

How about Person Of Interest?