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source | link

doDo means something along the lines of party in this instance. A post-wedding party, on the evening of the wedding, probably.

OED has:

DO, n.1
b. Something done in a set or formal manner; a performance; esp. an entertainment or show; a party; hence (orig. jocular), a military engagement, raid, or other ‘show’. Orig. dial. or vulgar.

and some examples of it'sits use first attested to from 1824.:

a 1824 J. BRIGGS Remains (1825) 243 Such individuals should have their feast (or do, as it is called).
1925 FRASER & GIBBONS Soldier & Sailor Words 78 Do, an event. A stunt. An attack, etc. E.g., ‘When is the do coming off?’; ‘The Somme do’; ‘The Havrincourt do’, etc.
1955 Times 18 May 14/2 Miss Margaret Herbison broadcast on behalf of the Labour Party last night a talk which she described as a ‘family do’.
1958 M. KERR People of Ship St. ix. 108 Her family has a ‘do’ every year on the anniversary of the day her mother's father died.    Ibid., Christmas ‘dos’ are especially important.

do means something along the lines of party in this instance. A post-wedding party, on the evening of the wedding, probably.

OED has

DO, n.1
b. Something done in a set or formal manner; a performance; esp. an entertainment or show; a party; hence (orig. jocular), a military engagement, raid, or other ‘show’. Orig. dial. or vulgar.

and some examples of it's use first attested to from 1824.

a 1824 J. BRIGGS Remains (1825) 243 Such individuals should have their feast (or do, as it is called).
1925 FRASER & GIBBONS Soldier & Sailor Words 78 Do, an event. A stunt. An attack, etc. E.g., ‘When is the do coming off?’; ‘The Somme do’; ‘The Havrincourt do’, etc.
1955 Times 18 May 14/2 Miss Margaret Herbison broadcast on behalf of the Labour Party last night a talk which she described as a ‘family do’.
1958 M. KERR People of Ship St. ix. 108 Her family has a ‘do’ every year on the anniversary of the day her mother's father died.    Ibid., Christmas ‘dos’ are especially important.

Do means something along the lines of party in this instance. A post-wedding party, on the evening of the wedding, probably.

OED has:

DO, n.1
b. Something done in a set or formal manner; a performance; esp. an entertainment or show; a party; hence (orig. jocular), a military engagement, raid, or other ‘show’. Orig. dial. or vulgar.

and some examples of its use first attested to from 1824:

a 1824 J. BRIGGS Remains (1825) 243 Such individuals should have their feast (or do, as it is called).
1925 FRASER & GIBBONS Soldier & Sailor Words 78 Do, an event. A stunt. An attack, etc. E.g., ‘When is the do coming off?’; ‘The Somme do’; ‘The Havrincourt do’, etc.
1955 Times 18 May 14/2 Miss Margaret Herbison broadcast on behalf of the Labour Party last night a talk which she described as a ‘family do’.
1958 M. KERR People of Ship St. ix. 108 Her family has a ‘do’ every year on the anniversary of the day her mother's father died.    Ibid., Christmas ‘dos’ are especially important.

2 added 164 characters in body
source | link

do means something along the lines of party in this instance. A post-wedding party, on the evening of the wedding, probably.

OED has

DO, n.1
b. Something done in a set or formal manner; a performance; esp. an entertainment or show; a party; hence (orig. jocular), a military engagement, raid, or other ‘show’. Orig. dial. or vulgar.

and some examples of it's use first attested to from 1824.

a 1824 J. BRIGGS Remains (1825) 243 Such individuals should have their feast (or do, as it is called).
1925 FRASER & GIBBONS Soldier & Sailor Words 78 Do, an event. A stunt. An attack, etc. E.g., ‘When is the do coming off?’; ‘The Somme do’; ‘The Havrincourt do’, etc.
1955 Times 18 May 14/2 Miss Margaret Herbison broadcast on behalf of the Labour Party last night a talk which she described as a ‘family do’.
1958 M. KERR People of Ship St. ix. 108 Her family has a ‘do’ every year on the anniversary of the day her mother's father died.    Ibid., Christmas ‘dos’ are especially important.

do means something along the lines of party in this instance. A post-wedding party, on the evening of the wedding, probably.

OED has

DO, n.1
b. Something done in a set or formal manner; a performance; esp. an entertainment or show; a party; hence (orig. jocular), a military engagement, raid, or other ‘show’. Orig. dial. or vulgar.

and some examples of it's use

1925 FRASER & GIBBONS Soldier & Sailor Words 78 Do, an event. A stunt. An attack, etc. E.g., ‘When is the do coming off?’; ‘The Somme do’; ‘The Havrincourt do’, etc.
1955 Times 18 May 14/2 Miss Margaret Herbison broadcast on behalf of the Labour Party last night a talk which she described as a ‘family do’.
1958 M. KERR People of Ship St. ix. 108 Her family has a ‘do’ every year on the anniversary of the day her mother's father died.    Ibid., Christmas ‘dos’ are especially important.

do means something along the lines of party in this instance. A post-wedding party, on the evening of the wedding, probably.

OED has

DO, n.1
b. Something done in a set or formal manner; a performance; esp. an entertainment or show; a party; hence (orig. jocular), a military engagement, raid, or other ‘show’. Orig. dial. or vulgar.

and some examples of it's use first attested to from 1824.

a 1824 J. BRIGGS Remains (1825) 243 Such individuals should have their feast (or do, as it is called).
1925 FRASER & GIBBONS Soldier & Sailor Words 78 Do, an event. A stunt. An attack, etc. E.g., ‘When is the do coming off?’; ‘The Somme do’; ‘The Havrincourt do’, etc.
1955 Times 18 May 14/2 Miss Margaret Herbison broadcast on behalf of the Labour Party last night a talk which she described as a ‘family do’.
1958 M. KERR People of Ship St. ix. 108 Her family has a ‘do’ every year on the anniversary of the day her mother's father died.    Ibid., Christmas ‘dos’ are especially important.

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source | link

do means something along the lines of party in this instance. A post-wedding party, on the evening of the wedding, probably.

OED has

DO, n.1
b. Something done in a set or formal manner; a performance; esp. an entertainment or show; a party; hence (orig. jocular), a military engagement, raid, or other ‘show’. Orig. dial. or vulgar.

and some examples of it's use

1925 FRASER & GIBBONS Soldier & Sailor Words 78 Do, an event. A stunt. An attack, etc. E.g., ‘When is the do coming off?’; ‘The Somme do’; ‘The Havrincourt do’, etc.
1955 Times 18 May 14/2 Miss Margaret Herbison broadcast on behalf of the Labour Party last night a talk which she described as a ‘family do’.
1958 M. KERR People of Ship St. ix. 108 Her family has a ‘do’ every year on the anniversary of the day her mother's father died.    Ibid., Christmas ‘dos’ are especially important.