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Linguistically, the direct object of give is the infinitive clause, with thee as the subject, and faithfully modifying to follow:

thee faithfully to follow

This statement is steeped in the theology of John Calvin. Born as a Puritan, Isaac Penington was influenced by John Calvin's teaching. The fourth principle of the Calvinist acronym, TULIP applies to this series of phrases:

The Lord lead thee as he seeth good, and give thee faithfully to follow; for else, if the Lord should lead in any thing, and thou not follow in that thing, his Spirit would be grieved and vexed thereby, and thy heart in danger of being hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.

Irresistible Grace:

When God calls his elect into salvation, they cannot resist. God offers to all people the gospel message. This is called the external call. But to the elect, God extends an internal call an internal call and it cannot be resisted. This call is by the Holy Spirit who works in the hearts and minds of the elect to bring them to repentance and regeneration whereby they willingly and freely come to God. Some of the verses used in support of this teaching are Romans 9:16 where it says that "it is not of him who wills nor of him who runs, but of God who has mercy"; Philippians 2:12-13 where God is said to be the one working salvation in the individual; John 6:28-29 where faith is declared to be the work of God; Acts 13:48 where God appoints people to believe; and John 1:12-13 where being born again is not by man’s will, but by God’s.

Pennington is praying that God will give his disciples both the internal and the external call.

  • The prayer: [May] The Lord

for

  • External call: The Lord leadlead thee as he seeth good

and

  • Internal call: give thee faithfully to follow

with

  • Explanation: for else, if the Lord should lead in any thing, and thou not follow in that thing, his Spirit would be grieved and vexed thereby, and thy heart in danger of being hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.

Those not steeped in Calvinist theology find it curious that God should have to fulfill his responsibility as well as ours. As Edwin Ashworth suggested, the phrase faithfully to follow could be replaced conceptually by the word grace:

The Lord lead thee as he seeth good, and give thee grace (the faithfully following type)...

It may be particularly perplexing that God should be vexed at our failure to follow, if he refused to give the internal call, but that is the intellectual foundation of Isaac Penington's statement.

Linguistically, the direct object of give is the infinitive clause, with thee as the subject, and faithfully modifying to follow:

thee faithfully to follow

This statement is steeped in the theology of John Calvin. Born as a Puritan, Isaac Penington was influenced by John Calvin's teaching. The fourth principle of the Calvinist acronym, TULIP applies to this series of phrases:

The Lord lead thee as he seeth good, and give thee faithfully to follow; for else, if the Lord should lead in any thing, and thou not follow in that thing, his Spirit would be grieved and vexed thereby, and thy heart in danger of being hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.

Irresistible Grace:

When God calls his elect into salvation, they cannot resist. God offers to all people the gospel message. This is called the external call. But to the elect, God extends an internal call and it cannot be resisted. This call is by the Holy Spirit who works in the hearts and minds of the elect to bring them to repentance and regeneration whereby they willingly and freely come to God. Some of the verses used in support of this teaching are Romans 9:16 where it says that "it is not of him who wills nor of him who runs, but of God who has mercy"; Philippians 2:12-13 where God is said to be the one working salvation in the individual; John 6:28-29 where faith is declared to be the work of God; Acts 13:48 where God appoints people to believe; and John 1:12-13 where being born again is not by man’s will, but by God’s.

Pennington is praying that God will give his disciples both the internal and the external call.

  • External call: The Lord lead thee as he seeth good

and

  • Internal call: give thee faithfully to follow

with

  • Explanation: for else, if the Lord should lead in any thing, and thou not follow in that thing, his Spirit would be grieved and vexed thereby, and thy heart in danger of being hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.

Those not steeped in Calvinist theology find it curious that God should have to fulfill his responsibility as well as ours. As Edwin Ashworth suggested, the phrase faithfully to follow could be replaced conceptually by the word grace:

The Lord lead thee as he seeth good, and give thee grace (the faithfully following type)...

It may be particularly perplexing that God should be vexed at our failure to follow, if he refused to give the internal call, but that is the intellectual foundation of Isaac Penington's statement.

Linguistically, the direct object of give is the infinitive clause, with thee as the subject, and faithfully modifying to follow:

thee faithfully to follow

This statement is steeped in the theology of John Calvin. Born as a Puritan, Isaac Penington was influenced by John Calvin's teaching. The fourth principle of the Calvinist acronym, TULIP applies to this series of phrases:

The Lord lead thee as he seeth good, and give thee faithfully to follow; for else, if the Lord should lead in any thing, and thou not follow in that thing, his Spirit would be grieved and vexed thereby, and thy heart in danger of being hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.

Irresistible Grace:

When God calls his elect into salvation, they cannot resist. God offers to all people the gospel message. This is called the external call. But to the elect, God extends an internal call and it cannot be resisted. This call is by the Holy Spirit who works in the hearts and minds of the elect to bring them to repentance and regeneration whereby they willingly and freely come to God. Some of the verses used in support of this teaching are Romans 9:16 where it says that "it is not of him who wills nor of him who runs, but of God who has mercy"; Philippians 2:12-13 where God is said to be the one working salvation in the individual; John 6:28-29 where faith is declared to be the work of God; Acts 13:48 where God appoints people to believe; and John 1:12-13 where being born again is not by man’s will, but by God’s.

Pennington is praying that God will give his disciples both the internal and the external call.

  • The prayer: [May] The Lord

for

  • External call: lead thee as he seeth good

and

  • Internal call: give thee faithfully to follow

with

  • Explanation: for else, if the Lord should lead in any thing, and thou not follow in that thing, his Spirit would be grieved and vexed thereby, and thy heart in danger of being hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.

Those not steeped in Calvinist theology find it curious that God should have to fulfill his responsibility as well as ours. As Edwin Ashworth suggested, the phrase faithfully to follow could be replaced conceptually by the word grace:

The Lord lead thee as he seeth good, and give thee grace (the faithfully following type)...

It may be particularly perplexing that God should be vexed at our failure to follow, if he refused to give the internal call, but that is the intellectual foundation of Isaac Penington's statement.

5 added 172 characters in body
source | link

Linguistically, the direct object of give is the infinitive clause, with thee as the subject, and faithfully modifying to follow:

thee faithfully to follow

This statement is steeped in the theology of John Calvin. Born as a Puritan, Isaac Penington was influenced by the doctrine of John CalvinCalvin's teaching. The fourth principle of the Calvinist acronym, TULIP applies to this series of statementsphrases:

The Lord lead thee as he seeth good, and give thee faithfully to follow; for else, if the Lord should lead in any thing, and thou not follow in that thing, his Spirit would be grieved and vexed thereby, and thy heart in danger of being hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.

Irresistible Grace:

When God calls his elect into salvation, they cannot resist. God offers to all people the gospel message. This is called the external call. But to the elect, God extends an internal call and it cannot be resisted. This call is by the Holy Spirit who works in the hearts and minds of the elect to bring them to repentance and regeneration whereby they willingly and freely come to God. Some of the verses used in support of this teaching are Romans 9:16 where it says that "it is not of him who wills nor of him who runs, but of God who has mercy"; Philippians 2:12-13 where God is said to be the one working salvation in the individual; John 6:28-29 where faith is declared to be the work of God; Acts 13:48 where God appoints people to believe; and John 1:12-13 where being born again is not by man’s will, but by God’s.

Pennington is praying that God will give his disciples both the internal and the external call.

  • External call: The Lord lead thee as he seeth good

and

  • Internal call: give thee faithfully to follow

with

  • Explanation: for else, if the Lord should lead in any thing, and thou not follow in that thing, his Spirit would be grieved and vexed thereby, and thy heart in danger of being hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.

Those not steeped in Calvinist theology find it curious that God should have to fulfill his responsibility as well as ours. As Edwin Ashworth suggested, the phrase faithfully to follow could be replaced conceptually by the word grace:

The Lord lead thee as he seeth good, and give thee grace (the faithfully following type)...

It may be particularly perplexing that God should be vexed at our failure to follow, if he refused to give the internal call, but that is the intellectual foundation of Isaac Penington's statement.

Born as a Puritan, Isaac Penington was influenced by the doctrine of John Calvin. The fourth principle of the Calvinist acronym, TULIP applies to this series of statements:

Irresistible Grace:

When God calls his elect into salvation, they cannot resist. God offers to all people the gospel message. This is called the external call. But to the elect, God extends an internal call and it cannot be resisted. This call is by the Holy Spirit who works in the hearts and minds of the elect to bring them to repentance and regeneration whereby they willingly and freely come to God. Some of the verses used in support of this teaching are Romans 9:16 where it says that "it is not of him who wills nor of him who runs, but of God who has mercy"; Philippians 2:12-13 where God is said to be the one working salvation in the individual; John 6:28-29 where faith is declared to be the work of God; Acts 13:48 where God appoints people to believe; and John 1:12-13 where being born again is not by man’s will, but by God’s.

Pennington is praying that God will give his disciples both the internal and the external call.

  • External call: The Lord lead thee as he seeth good

and

  • Internal call: give thee faithfully to follow

with

  • Explanation: for else, if the Lord should lead in any thing, and thou not follow in that thing, his Spirit would be grieved and vexed thereby, and thy heart in danger of being hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.

Those not steeped in Calvinist theology find it curious that God should have to fulfill his responsibility as well as ours. As Edwin Ashworth suggested, the phrase faithfully to follow could be replaced conceptually by the word grace:

The Lord lead thee as he seeth good, and give thee grace (the faithfully following type)...

It may be particularly perplexing that God should be vexed at our failure to follow, if he refused to give the internal call, but that is the intellectual foundation of Isaac Penington's statement.

Linguistically, the direct object of give is the infinitive clause, with thee as the subject, and faithfully modifying to follow:

thee faithfully to follow

This statement is steeped in the theology of John Calvin. Born as a Puritan, Isaac Penington was influenced by John Calvin's teaching. The fourth principle of the Calvinist acronym, TULIP applies to this series of phrases:

The Lord lead thee as he seeth good, and give thee faithfully to follow; for else, if the Lord should lead in any thing, and thou not follow in that thing, his Spirit would be grieved and vexed thereby, and thy heart in danger of being hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.

Irresistible Grace:

When God calls his elect into salvation, they cannot resist. God offers to all people the gospel message. This is called the external call. But to the elect, God extends an internal call and it cannot be resisted. This call is by the Holy Spirit who works in the hearts and minds of the elect to bring them to repentance and regeneration whereby they willingly and freely come to God. Some of the verses used in support of this teaching are Romans 9:16 where it says that "it is not of him who wills nor of him who runs, but of God who has mercy"; Philippians 2:12-13 where God is said to be the one working salvation in the individual; John 6:28-29 where faith is declared to be the work of God; Acts 13:48 where God appoints people to believe; and John 1:12-13 where being born again is not by man’s will, but by God’s.

Pennington is praying that God will give his disciples both the internal and the external call.

  • External call: The Lord lead thee as he seeth good

and

  • Internal call: give thee faithfully to follow

with

  • Explanation: for else, if the Lord should lead in any thing, and thou not follow in that thing, his Spirit would be grieved and vexed thereby, and thy heart in danger of being hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.

Those not steeped in Calvinist theology find it curious that God should have to fulfill his responsibility as well as ours. As Edwin Ashworth suggested, the phrase faithfully to follow could be replaced conceptually by the word grace:

The Lord lead thee as he seeth good, and give thee grace (the faithfully following type)...

It may be particularly perplexing that God should be vexed at our failure to follow, if he refused to give the internal call, but that is the intellectual foundation of Isaac Penington's statement.

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The infinitive phrase faithfully to follow is the direct object.

Born as a Puritan, Isaac Penington was influenced by the doctrine of John Calvin. The fourth principle of the Calvinist acronym, TULIP applies to this series of statements:

Irresistible Grace:

When God calls his elect into salvation, they cannot resist. God offers to all people the gospel message. This is called the external call. But to the elect, God extends an internal call and it cannot be resisted. This call is by the Holy Spirit who works in the hearts and minds of the elect to bring them to repentance and regeneration whereby they willingly and freely come to God. Some of the verses used in support of this teaching are Romans 9:16 where it says that "it is not of him who wills nor of him who runs, but of God who has mercy"; Philippians 2:12-13 where God is said to be the one working salvation in the individual; John 6:28-29 where faith is declared to be the work of God; Acts 13:48 where God appoints people to believe; and John 1:12-13 where being born again is not by man’s will, but by God’s.

Pennington is praying that God will give his disciples both the internal and the external call.

  • External call: The Lord lead thee as he seeth good

and

  • Internal call: give thee faithfully to follow

with

  • Explanation: for else, if the Lord should lead in any thing, and thou not follow in that thing, his Spirit would be grieved and vexed thereby, and thy heart in danger of being hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.

Those not steeped in Calvinist theology find it curious that God should have to fulfill his responsibility as well as ours. As Edwin Ashworth suggested, the phrase faithfully to follow could be replaced conceptually by the word grace.:

The Lord lead thee as he seeth good, and give thee grace (the faithfully following type)...

It may be particularly perplexing that God should be vexed at our failure to follow, if he refused to give the internal call, but that is the intellectual foundation of Isaac Penington's statement.

The infinitive phrase faithfully to follow is the direct object.

Born as a Puritan, Isaac Penington was influenced by the doctrine of John Calvin. The fourth principle of the Calvinist acronym, TULIP applies to this series of statements:

Irresistible Grace:

When God calls his elect into salvation, they cannot resist. God offers to all people the gospel message. This is called the external call. But to the elect, God extends an internal call and it cannot be resisted. This call is by the Holy Spirit who works in the hearts and minds of the elect to bring them to repentance and regeneration whereby they willingly and freely come to God. Some of the verses used in support of this teaching are Romans 9:16 where it says that "it is not of him who wills nor of him who runs, but of God who has mercy"; Philippians 2:12-13 where God is said to be the one working salvation in the individual; John 6:28-29 where faith is declared to be the work of God; Acts 13:48 where God appoints people to believe; and John 1:12-13 where being born again is not by man’s will, but by God’s.

Pennington is praying that God will give his disciples both the internal and the external call.

  • External call: The Lord lead thee as he seeth good

and

  • Internal call: give thee faithfully to follow

with

  • Explanation: for else, if the Lord should lead in any thing, and thou not follow in that thing, his Spirit would be grieved and vexed thereby, and thy heart in danger of being hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.

Those not steeped in Calvinist theology find it curious that God should have to fulfill his responsibility as well as ours. As Edwin Ashworth suggested, the phrase faithfully to follow could be replaced conceptually by the word grace.

The Lord lead thee as he seeth good, and give thee grace (the faithfully following type)...

It may be particularly perplexing that God should be vexed at our failure to follow, if he refused to give the internal call, but that is the intellectual foundation of Isaac Penington's statement.

Born as a Puritan, Isaac Penington was influenced by the doctrine of John Calvin. The fourth principle of the Calvinist acronym, TULIP applies to this series of statements:

Irresistible Grace:

When God calls his elect into salvation, they cannot resist. God offers to all people the gospel message. This is called the external call. But to the elect, God extends an internal call and it cannot be resisted. This call is by the Holy Spirit who works in the hearts and minds of the elect to bring them to repentance and regeneration whereby they willingly and freely come to God. Some of the verses used in support of this teaching are Romans 9:16 where it says that "it is not of him who wills nor of him who runs, but of God who has mercy"; Philippians 2:12-13 where God is said to be the one working salvation in the individual; John 6:28-29 where faith is declared to be the work of God; Acts 13:48 where God appoints people to believe; and John 1:12-13 where being born again is not by man’s will, but by God’s.

Pennington is praying that God will give his disciples both the internal and the external call.

  • External call: The Lord lead thee as he seeth good

and

  • Internal call: give thee faithfully to follow

with

  • Explanation: for else, if the Lord should lead in any thing, and thou not follow in that thing, his Spirit would be grieved and vexed thereby, and thy heart in danger of being hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.

Those not steeped in Calvinist theology find it curious that God should have to fulfill his responsibility as well as ours. As Edwin Ashworth suggested, the phrase faithfully to follow could be replaced conceptually by the word grace:

The Lord lead thee as he seeth good, and give thee grace (the faithfully following type)...

It may be particularly perplexing that God should be vexed at our failure to follow, if he refused to give the internal call, but that is the intellectual foundation of Isaac Penington's statement.

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