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This difference is a matter of regional variation. For example, in California we refer to our freewaysa freeway either by its memorial name or number. With its proper name we use "the," as in "everything is backed up on the Nimitz Freeway." In northern California, we don't with the state or federal number we don't: "everything in backed up on I-880 right now." But in southern California they put "the" in front of both. "It is jammed on the 405 and the Hollywood Expressway, but smooth sailing if you're heading eastbound on the 10."

It seems to me as we go east in the state, more people "go to coffee," where "coffee" has the sense of a proper name or definite place. On the coast, we go to Starbucks or Peet's, but if the place is indefinite we go get some coffee. Both are understandable. The alternate form may sound out of place, but usually goes without notice.

"Go" in a broader sense also gets used a lot. In my experience it's more common in Ohio and to the southeast: "I'll give you three dollars for that Dale Earnhardt commemorative dish." "If you go [to] four dollars and I'll give you two." Or "let's go to 3 o'clock" for some activity. I can't say I even notice it anymore, unless I'm thinking about it.

This difference is a matter of regional variation. For example, in California we refer to our freeways either by its memorial name or number. With its proper name we use "the," as in "everything is backed up on the Nimitz Freeway." In northern California, with the state or federal number we don't: "everything in backed up on I-880 right now." But in southern California they put "the" in front of both. "It is jammed on the 405 and the Hollywood Expressway, but smooth sailing if you're heading eastbound on the 10."

It seems to me as we go east in the state, more people "go to coffee," where "coffee" has the sense of a proper name or definite place. On the coast, we go to Starbucks or Peet's, but if the place is indefinite we go get some coffee. Both are understandable. The alternate form may sound out of place, but usually goes without notice.

"Go" in a broader sense also gets used a lot. In my experience it's more common in Ohio and to the southeast: "I'll give you three dollars for that Dale Earnhardt commemorative dish." "If you go [to] four dollars and I'll give you two." Or "let's go to 3 o'clock" for some activity. I can't say I even notice it anymore, unless I'm thinking about it.

This difference is a matter of regional variation. For example, in California we refer to a freeway either by its memorial name or number. With its proper name we use "the," as in "everything is backed up on the Nimitz." In northern California, we don't with the state or federal number: "everything in backed up on I-880 right now." But in southern California they put "the" in front of both. "It is jammed on the 405 and the Hollywood Expressway, but smooth sailing if you're heading eastbound on the 10."

It seems to me as we go east in the state, more people "go to coffee," where "coffee" has the sense of a proper name or definite place. On the coast, we go to Starbucks or Peet's, but if the place is indefinite we go get some coffee. Both are understandable. The alternate form may sound out of place, but usually goes without notice.

"Go" in a broader sense also gets used a lot. In my experience it's more common in Ohio and to the southeast: "I'll give you three dollars for that Dale Earnhardt commemorative dish." "If you go [to] four dollars and I'll give you two." Or "let's go to 3 o'clock" for some activity. I can't say I even notice it anymore, unless I'm thinking about it.

2 deleted 5 characters in body
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This difference is a matter of regional variation. For example, in California we refer to our freeways and either by its memorial name or number. With aits proper name we use "the""the," as in "everything is backed up on the Nimitz Freeway." In northern California, if we usewith the state or federal number we don't: "everything in backed up on I-880 right now." But in southern California they put "the" in front of everythingboth. "It is jammed on the 405 and the Hollywood Expressway, but smooth sailing if you're heading eastbound on the 10."

It seems to me as we go east in the state, more people "go to coffee," where "coffee" has the sense of a proper name or definite place. On the coast, we go to Starbucks or Peet's, but if the place is indefinite we mostly go get some coffee. Both are understandable in either location. The alternate form may sound out of place, but is mostly ignoredusually goes without notice.

"Go" in a broader sense also gets used a lot. In my experience it's more common in Ohio and to the southeast: "I'll give you three dollars for that Dale Earnhardt commemorative dish." "If you go [to] four dollars and I'll give you two." Or "let's go to 3 o'clock" for some activity is common. I can't say I even notice it anymore, unless I'm thinking about it.

This difference is a matter of regional variation. For example, in California we refer to our freeways and either by memorial name or number. With a proper name we use "the" as in "everything is backed up on the Nimitz Freeway." In northern California, if we use the state or federal number we don't: "everything in backed up on I-880 right now." But in southern California they put "the" in front of everything. "It is jammed on the 405, but smooth sailing if you're heading eastbound on the 10."

It seems to me as we go east in the state, more people "go to coffee," where "coffee" has the sense of a proper name or definite place. On the coast, we go to Starbucks or Peet's, but if the place is indefinite we mostly go get some coffee. Both are understandable in either location. The alternate form may sound out of place, but is mostly ignored.

"Go" in a broader sense also gets used a lot. In my experience it's more common in Ohio and to the southeast: "I'll give you three dollars for that Dale Earnhardt commemorative dish." "If you go [to] four dollars and I'll give you two." Or "let's go to 3 o'clock" for some activity is common. I can't say I even notice it anymore, unless I'm thinking about it.

This difference is a matter of regional variation. For example, in California we refer to our freeways either by its memorial name or number. With its proper name we use "the," as in "everything is backed up on the Nimitz Freeway." In northern California, with the state or federal number we don't: "everything in backed up on I-880 right now." But in southern California they put "the" in front of both. "It is jammed on the 405 and the Hollywood Expressway, but smooth sailing if you're heading eastbound on the 10."

It seems to me as we go east in the state, more people "go to coffee," where "coffee" has the sense of a proper name or definite place. On the coast, we go to Starbucks or Peet's, but if the place is indefinite we go get some coffee. Both are understandable. The alternate form may sound out of place, but usually goes without notice.

"Go" in a broader sense also gets used a lot. In my experience it's more common in Ohio and to the southeast: "I'll give you three dollars for that Dale Earnhardt commemorative dish." "If you go [to] four dollars and I'll give you two." Or "let's go to 3 o'clock" for some activity. I can't say I even notice it anymore, unless I'm thinking about it.

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This difference is a matter of regional variation. For example, in California we refer to our freeways and either by memorial name or number. With a proper name we use "the" as in "everything is backed up on the Nimitz Freeway." In northern California, if we use the state or federal number we don't: "everything in backed up on I-880 right now." But in southern California they put "the" in front of everything. "It is jammed on the 405, but smooth sailing if you're heading eastbound on the 10."

It seems to me as we go east in the state, more people "go to coffee," where "coffee" has the sense of a proper name or definite place. On the coast, we go to Starbucks or Peet's, but if the place is indefinite we mostly go get some coffee. Both are understandable in either location. The alternate form may sound out of place, but is mostly ignored.

"Go" in a broader sense also gets used a lot. In my experience it's more common in Ohio and to the southeast: "I'll give you three dollars for that Dale Earnhardt commemorative dish." "If you go [to] four dollars and I'll give you two." Or "let's go to 3 o'clock" for some activity is common. I can't say I even notice it anymore, unless I'm thinking about it.