3 gave sources; added 81 characters in body
source | link

Google books shows that

I'm not kidding,

used in the same sense as it is in America today, appears in the British novel A Daughter of the Philistines by Leonard Merrick (1897) and in the British novel The Story of the Amulet by Edith Nesbit (1906). All Jack Paar did was invert the word order to get I kid you not.

Merriam-Webster says that kid (used in this way) is a transitive verb, so the correct American usage is

I'm kidding you.

or

I'm not kidding.

which is a variant of "I kid you not" that I expect is more common (they both mean "I mean what I'm saying"). Because the verb is transitive,

Can't I kid with you.

would presumably be incorrect because of the with (and it definitely sounds wrong to me). On the other hand, you can say

Can't I kid around with you.

According to the other answers, the expression seems to have died out in Britain.

Merriam-Webster says that kid (used in this way) is a transitive verb, so the correct American usage is

I'm kidding you.

or

I'm not kidding.

which is a variant of "I kid you not" that I expect is more common (they both mean "I mean what I'm saying"). Because the verb is transitive,

Can't I kid with you.

would presumably be incorrect because of the with (and it sounds wrong to me). On the other hand, you can say

Can't I kid around with you.

Google books shows that

I'm not kidding,

used in the same sense as it is in America today, appears in the British novel A Daughter of the Philistines by Leonard Merrick (1897) and in the British novel The Story of the Amulet by Edith Nesbit (1906). All Jack Paar did was invert the word order to get I kid you not.

Merriam-Webster says that kid (used in this way) is a transitive verb, so the correct American usage is

I'm kidding you.

or

I'm not kidding.

Because the verb is transitive,

Can't I kid with you.

would be incorrect because of the with (and it definitely sounds wrong to me). On the other hand, you can say

Can't I kid around with you.

According to the other answers, the expression seems to have died out in Britain.

2 added 22 characters in body; edited body; added 1 characters in body
source | link

Merriam-Webster says that kid (used in this way) is a transitive verb, so the correct American usage is

I'm kidding you.

or

I'm not kidding.

which is a variant of "I kid you not" that I expect is more common; theycommon (they both mean "I mean what I'm sayingsaying")." Because the verb is transitive,

I'm kiddingCan't I kid with you.

would presumably be incorrect because of the with (and it sounds wrong to me). On the other hand, you can say

I'm kiddingCan't I kid around with you.

Merriam-Webster says that kid (used in this way) is a transitive verb, so the correct American usage is

I'm kidding you.

or

I'm not kidding.

which is a variant of "I kid you not" that I expect is more common; they both mean "I mean what I'm saying." Because the verb is transitive,

I'm kidding with you.

would presumably be incorrect (and it sounds wrong to me). On the other hand, you can say

I'm kidding around with you.

Merriam-Webster says that kid (used in this way) is a transitive verb, so the correct American usage is

I'm kidding you.

or

I'm not kidding.

which is a variant of "I kid you not" that I expect is more common (they both mean "I mean what I'm saying"). Because the verb is transitive,

Can't I kid with you.

would presumably be incorrect because of the with (and it sounds wrong to me). On the other hand, you can say

Can't I kid around with you.

1
source | link

Merriam-Webster says that kid (used in this way) is a transitive verb, so the correct American usage is

I'm kidding you.

or

I'm not kidding.

which is a variant of "I kid you not" that I expect is more common; they both mean "I mean what I'm saying." Because the verb is transitive,

I'm kidding with you.

would presumably be incorrect (and it sounds wrong to me). On the other hand, you can say

I'm kidding around with you.