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I'd never seen this splendid word until today, but I feel compelled to bring it to the public's attention:

From http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pococuranteMerriam-Webster: 

pococurante - adjective \ˈpō-kō-kyu̇-ˈran-tē meaning indifferent, nonchalant. From the Italian for "caring little"

It may have found its origin, capitalised, as a character in Voltaire's Candide.

There's a lovely non-capitalised usage in an essay on Lord Melbourne, by Abraham Hayward, published in 1858.

...during … during many years he apparently led a careless, indolent, pococurante life, divided between the gay circles of London and the House of Commons.

I'd never seen this splendid word until today, but I feel compelled to bring it to the public's attention:

From http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pococurante:

pococurante - adjective \ˈpō-kō-kyu̇-ˈran-tē meaning indifferent, nonchalant. From the Italian for "caring little"

It may have found its origin, capitalised, as a character in Voltaire's Candide.

There's a lovely non-capitalised usage in an essay on Lord Melbourne, by Abraham Hayward, published in 1858.

...during many years he apparently led a careless, indolent, pococurante life, divided between the gay circles of London and the House of Commons.

I'd never seen this splendid word until today, but I feel compelled to bring it to the public's attention:

From Merriam-Webster: 

pococurante - adjective \ˈpō-kō-kyu̇-ˈran-tē meaning indifferent, nonchalant. From the Italian for "caring little"

It may have found its origin, capitalised, as a character in Voltaire's Candide.

There's a lovely non-capitalised usage in an essay on Lord Melbourne, by Abraham Hayward, published in 1858.

… during many years he apparently led a careless, indolent, pococurante life, divided between the gay circles of London and the House of Commons.

2 Include text attribution, which was hidden in violation of the mod directive on meta about this
source | link

I'd never seen this splendid word until today, but I feel compelled to bring it to the public's attention:

From http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pococurante:

pococurante - adjective \ˈpō-kō-kyu̇-ˈran-tē meaning indifferent, nonchalant. From the Italian for "caring little"

It may have found its origin, capitalised, as a character in Voltaire's Candide.

There's a lovely non-capitalised usage in an essay on Lord Melbourne, by Abraham Hayward, published in 1858.

...during many years he apparently led a careless, indolent, pococurante life, divided between the gay circles of London and the House of Commons.

I'd never seen this splendid word until today, but I feel compelled to bring it to the public's attention:

pococurante - adjective \ˈpō-kō-kyu̇-ˈran-tē meaning indifferent, nonchalant. From the Italian for "caring little"

It may have found its origin, capitalised, as a character in Voltaire's Candide.

There's a lovely non-capitalised usage in an essay on Lord Melbourne, by Abraham Hayward, published in 1858.

...during many years he apparently led a careless, indolent, pococurante life, divided between the gay circles of London and the House of Commons.

I'd never seen this splendid word until today, but I feel compelled to bring it to the public's attention:

From http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pococurante:

pococurante - adjective \ˈpō-kō-kyu̇-ˈran-tē meaning indifferent, nonchalant. From the Italian for "caring little"

It may have found its origin, capitalised, as a character in Voltaire's Candide.

There's a lovely non-capitalised usage in an essay on Lord Melbourne, by Abraham Hayward, published in 1858.

...during many years he apparently led a careless, indolent, pococurante life, divided between the gay circles of London and the House of Commons.

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source | link

I'd never seen this splendid word until today, but I feel compelled to bring it to the public's attention:

pococurante - adjective \ˈpō-kō-kyu̇-ˈran-tē meaning indifferent, nonchalant. From the Italian for "caring little"

It may have found its origin, capitalised, as a character in Voltaire's Candide.

There's a lovely non-capitalised usage in an essay on Lord Melbourne, by Abraham Hayward, published in 1858.

...during many years he apparently led a careless, indolent, pococurante life, divided between the gay circles of London and the House of Commons.