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Long story short, I'm writing a story about vampires inworking on a largernovel while trying to take into account the historical context surrounding it. They likely have their own slang to help them avoid any references toIt begins in 1140 AD, so the suncharacters would use Old English, Latin, Old French, and to Godother similar languages from that time period. It also features some vampiric characters. Over the years, since both of those thingsthese vampires have the powerdeveloped their own terminologies to kill them. They do sayrefer to common things like "and that's when everything hit daybreak," but only in the context of negative things such as relative time, without referring to daylight.

Today is easy to conjugate into tonight, and yesterday similarly transfers to yesternight, although that sounds somewhat odd in our language. However, tomorrow is not as easy to translate.

Morrow comes from the Old English morgen, which means morning. (Source: American Heritage Dictionary, fourth edition4th Edition) Therefore tomorrow means the next morning in its oldest variant. Therefore the vampires (who are generally very long-lived, and many of which speakthe Old English)-English-speaking vampires would not use morrow or tomorrow, and would come up with their own slangwords.

Any ideas asMy question is, what words exist in a historical context that allow the speaker to refer to time periods without necessarily connoting daytime? Or, if there are none, what slangwords would be etymologically appropriaterealistically have developed given the languages present?

To be specific,Tomorrow is the word giving me the most trouble, but I'll also accept other answers that explain how I am looking for should mean "the night (orcan refer to time period) after this one" without directly referring to the daylight hoursdaytime.


Edit My main concern is staying in context; I don't want to make up words that have no etymological basis.

This story is set on an Earth as close toHelpful answers will give a sourced example of where the real world as I can getword was found and how it. It begins in 1140 AD, so Old English, Old French was used (along with what language it derives from), and Latinor an explanation of where the roots they are all languages definitely in use atusing to derive the time. I would likenew word and why it makes sense to be as historically accurate as possible..derive the word from those roots. although making things up is fun

I'll also accept phrases, hence this question.since language :)is complex, and there might be no single word that does the topic justice.

Long story short, I'm writing a story about vampires in a larger historical context. They likely have their own slang to help them avoid any references to the sun and to God, since both of those things have the power to kill them. They do say things like "and that's when everything hit daybreak," but only in the context of negative things.

Today is easy to conjugate into tonight, and yesterday similarly transfers to yesternight, although that sounds somewhat odd in our language. However, tomorrow is not as easy to translate.

Morrow comes from the Old English morgen, which means morning. (Source: American Heritage Dictionary, fourth edition) Therefore tomorrow means the next morning in its oldest variant. Therefore the vampires (who are generally very long-lived and many of which speak Old English) would not use morrow or tomorrow, and would come up with their own slang.

Any ideas as to what slang would be etymologically appropriate?

To be specific, the word I am looking for should mean "the night (or time period) after this one" without directly referring to the daylight hours.


Edit

This story is set on an Earth as close to the real world as I can get it. It begins in 1140 AD, so Old English, Old French, and Latin are all languages definitely in use at the time. I would like it to be as historically accurate as possible... although making things up is fun, hence this question. :)

I'm working on a novel while trying to take into account the historical context surrounding it. It begins in 1140 AD, so the characters would use Old English, Latin, Old French, and other similar languages from that time period. It also features some vampiric characters. Over the years, these vampires have developed their own terminologies to refer to common things, such as relative time, without referring to daylight.

Today is easy to conjugate into tonight, and yesterday similarly transfers to yesternight, although that sounds somewhat odd in our language. However, tomorrow is not as easy to translate.

Morrow comes from the Old English morgen, which means morning. (Source: American Heritage Dictionary, 4th Edition) Therefore tomorrow means the next morning in its oldest variant, and the Old-English-speaking vampires would not use morrow or tomorrow, and would come up with their own words.

My question is, what words exist in a historical context that allow the speaker to refer to time periods without necessarily connoting daytime? Or, if there are none, what words would realistically have developed given the languages present?

Tomorrow is the word giving me the most trouble, but I'll also accept other answers that explain how I can refer to time without referring to the daytime. My main concern is staying in context; I don't want to make up words that have no etymological basis.

Helpful answers will give a sourced example of where the word was found and how it was used (along with what language it derives from), or an explanation of where the roots they are using to derive the new word and why it makes sense to derive the word from those roots.

I'll also accept phrases, since language is complex, and there might be no single word that does the topic justice.

    Post Closed as "off-topic" by tchrist, RegDwigнt
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Long story short, I'm writing a story about vampires in a larger historical context. They likely have their own slang to help them avoid any references to the sun and to God, since both of those things have the power to kill them. They do say things like "and that's when everything hit daybreak," but only in the context of negative things.

Today is easy to conjugate into tonight, and yesterday similarly transfers to yesternight, although that sounds somewhat odd in our language. However, tomorrow is not as easy to translate.

Morrow comes from the Old English morgen, which means morning. (Source: American Heritage Dictionary, fourth edition) Therefore tomorrow means the next morning in its oldest variant. Therefore the vampires (who are generally very long-lived and many of which speak Old English) would not use morrow or tomorrow, and would come up with their own slang.

Any ideas as to what slang would be etymologically appropriate?

To be specific, the word I am looking for should mean "the night (or time period) after this one" without directly referring to the daylight hours.


Edit

This story is set on an Earth as close to the real world as I can get it. It begins in 1140 AD, so Old English, Old French, and Latin are all languages definitely in use at the time. I would like it to be as historically accurate as possible... although making things up is fun, hence this question. :)

Long story short, I'm writing a story about vampires in a larger historical context. They likely have their own slang to help them avoid any references to the sun and to God, since both of those things have the power to kill them. They do say things like "and that's when everything hit daybreak," but only in the context of negative things.

Today is easy to conjugate into tonight, and yesterday similarly transfers to yesternight, although that sounds somewhat odd in our language. However, tomorrow is not as easy to translate.

Morrow comes from the Old English morgen, which means morning. (Source: American Heritage Dictionary, fourth edition) Therefore tomorrow means the next morning in its oldest variant. Therefore the vampires (who are generally very long-lived and many of which speak Old English) would not use morrow or tomorrow, and would come up with their own slang.

Any ideas as to what slang would be etymologically appropriate?

To be specific, the word I am looking for should mean "the night (or time period) after this one" without directly referring to the daylight hours.

Long story short, I'm writing a story about vampires in a larger historical context. They likely have their own slang to help them avoid any references to the sun and to God, since both of those things have the power to kill them. They do say things like "and that's when everything hit daybreak," but only in the context of negative things.

Today is easy to conjugate into tonight, and yesterday similarly transfers to yesternight, although that sounds somewhat odd in our language. However, tomorrow is not as easy to translate.

Morrow comes from the Old English morgen, which means morning. (Source: American Heritage Dictionary, fourth edition) Therefore tomorrow means the next morning in its oldest variant. Therefore the vampires (who are generally very long-lived and many of which speak Old English) would not use morrow or tomorrow, and would come up with their own slang.

Any ideas as to what slang would be etymologically appropriate?

To be specific, the word I am looking for should mean "the night (or time period) after this one" without directly referring to the daylight hours.


Edit

This story is set on an Earth as close to the real world as I can get it. It begins in 1140 AD, so Old English, Old French, and Latin are all languages definitely in use at the time. I would like it to be as historically accurate as possible... although making things up is fun, hence this question. :)

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What word can I use instead of "tomorrow" that is not connected with the idea of the rising sun?

Long story short, I'm writing a story about vampires in a larger historical context. They likely have their own slang to help them avoid any references to the sun and to God, since both of those things have the power to kill them. They do say things like "and that's when everything hit daybreak," but only in the context of negative things.

Today is easy to conjugate into tonight, and yesterday similarly transfers to yesternight, although that sounds somewhat odd in our language. However, tomorrow is not as easy to translate.

Morrow comes from the Old English morgen, which means morning. (Source: American Heritage Dictionary, fourth edition) Therefore tomorrow means the next morning in its oldest variant. Therefore the vampires (who are generally very long-lived and many of which speak Old English) would not use morrow or tomorrow, and would come up with their own slang.

Any ideas as to what slang would be etymologically appropriate?

To be specific, the word I am looking for should mean "the night (or time period) after this one" without directly referring to the daylight hours.