Tweeted twitter.com/StackEnglish/status/901288750927446016
3 edited tags
| link
2 edited body; edited title
source | link

"Cancellation", "Canceled", "Canceling" - US usage

I'm trying to figure out if there is a specific rule behind the word "Cancel""cancel" that would cause "cancellation" to have two L's, but "canceled" and "canceling" to have only one (in the US).

I understand the rules are very loose when it comes to double L's in English, and I have read several posts on here talking about "canceled" and "canceling" (vs "cancelled" and "cancelling"), but my specific question is more about the spelling of "cancellation".

  • US English Oxford Dictionary - they do NOT mention cancelation with one "L"
  • Meriam Webster - they do seem to have cancelation listed with one "L"
  • Microsoft Word marks "cancelation" as an invalid word
  • Same with the spell checker in Firefox

So my question is: is there a reason or rule why in US English, "cancellation" seems to have two L's (to most dictionaries), while "canceled" and "canceling" does not?

"Cancellation", "Canceled", "Canceling" - US usage

I'm trying to figure out if there is a specific rule behind the word "Cancel" that would cause "cancellation" to have two L's, but "canceled" and "canceling" to have only one (in the US).

I understand the rules are very loose when it comes to double L's in English, and I have read several posts on here talking about "canceled" and "canceling" (vs "cancelled" and "cancelling"), but my specific question is more about the spelling of "cancellation".

  • US English Oxford Dictionary - they do NOT mention cancelation with one "L"
  • Meriam Webster - they do seem to have cancelation listed with one "L"
  • Microsoft Word marks "cancelation" as an invalid word
  • Same with the spell checker in Firefox

So my question is: is there a reason or rule why in US English, "cancellation" seems to have two L's (to most dictionaries), while "canceled" and "canceling" does not?

"Cancellation", "Canceled", "Canceling" US usage

I'm trying to figure out if there is a specific rule behind the word "cancel" that would cause "cancellation" to have two L's, but "canceled" and "canceling" to have only one (in the US).

I understand the rules are very loose when it comes to double L's in English, and I have read several posts on here talking about "canceled" and "canceling" (vs "cancelled" and "cancelling"), but my specific question is more about the spelling of "cancellation".

  • US English Oxford Dictionary - they do NOT mention cancelation with one "L"
  • Meriam Webster - they do seem to have cancelation listed with one "L"
  • Microsoft Word marks "cancelation" as an invalid word
  • Same with the spell checker in Firefox

So my question is: is there a reason or rule why in US English, "cancellation" seems to have two L's (to most dictionaries), while "canceled" and "canceling" does not?

1
source | link

"Cancellation", "Canceled", "Canceling" - US usage

I'm trying to figure out if there is a specific rule behind the word "Cancel" that would cause "cancellation" to have two L's, but "canceled" and "canceling" to have only one (in the US).

I understand the rules are very loose when it comes to double L's in English, and I have read several posts on here talking about "canceled" and "canceling" (vs "cancelled" and "cancelling"), but my specific question is more about the spelling of "cancellation".

  • US English Oxford Dictionary - they do NOT mention cancelation with one "L"
  • Meriam Webster - they do seem to have cancelation listed with one "L"
  • Microsoft Word marks "cancelation" as an invalid word
  • Same with the spell checker in Firefox

So my question is: is there a reason or rule why in US English, "cancellation" seems to have two L's (to most dictionaries), while "canceled" and "canceling" does not?