2 added 161 characters in body
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There are a few sources of this online, but none give anything more drilled down than the ones you've already quoted.

While skeptically allowing that they may all be working from the same flawed sources, the logic seems to be this:

Cocksure, cocks wounds, etc. were oaths and phrases from a time when using the word God was serious blasphemy. But, basically, the word cock really seems to have meant God (at least to some people).

What is unclear is if this isIt appears to merely be a stand-in word: a minced oath. Much in the way people say "Oh my goodness", instead of "Oh my god", to avoid blasphemy. Without any further information I would say this is a likely explanation for something that shows no other etymological trail.

Otherwise: I personally believe the version from the Online Etymological Dictionary. That itHere is derivedan excerpt from Swearing: A Social History of Foul Language, Oaths, and Profanity in English, by Geoffrey Hughes:

enter image description here

Seeing the self-assurance associated with cocks. (Thanks to Brad Szonyecontext in Shakespeare pretty much nails it for introducing me to that useful tool.)

There are a few sources of this online, but none give anything more drilled down than the ones you've already quoted.

While skeptically allowing that they may all be working from the same flawed sources, the logic seems to be this:

Cocksure, cocks wounds, etc. were oaths and phrases from a time when using the word God was serious blasphemy. But, basically, the word cock really seems to have meant God (at least to some people).

What is unclear is if this is merely a stand-in word. Much in the way people say "Oh my goodness", instead of "Oh my god", to avoid blasphemy. Without any further information I would say this is a likely explanation for something that shows no other etymological trail.

Otherwise: I personally believe the version from the Online Etymological Dictionary. That it is derived from the self-assurance associated with cocks. (Thanks to Brad Szonye for introducing me to that useful tool.)

There are a few sources of this online, but none give anything more drilled down than the ones you've already quoted.

While skeptically allowing that they may all be working from the same flawed sources, the logic seems to be this:

Cocksure, cocks wounds, etc. were oaths and phrases from a time when using the word God was serious blasphemy. But, basically, the word cock really seems to have meant God (at least to some people).

It appears to merely be a stand-in word: a minced oath. Much in the way people say "Oh my goodness", instead of "Oh my god", to avoid blasphemy.

Here is an excerpt from Swearing: A Social History of Foul Language, Oaths, and Profanity in English, by Geoffrey Hughes:

enter image description here

Seeing the context in Shakespeare pretty much nails it for me.

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source | link

There are a few sources of this online, but none give anything more drilled down than the ones you've already quoted.

While skeptically allowing that they may all be working from the same flawed sources, the logic seems to be this:

Cocksure, cocks wounds, etc. were oaths and phrases from a time when using the word God was serious blasphemy. But, basically, the word cock really seems to have meant God (at least to some people).

What is unclear is if this is merely a stand-in word. Much in the way people say "Oh my goodness", instead of "Oh my god", to avoid blasphemy. Without any further information I would say this is a likely explanation for something that shows no other etymological trail.

Otherwise: I personally believe the version from the Online Etymological Dictionary. That it is derived from the self-assurance associated with cocks. (Thanks to Brad Szonye for introducing me to that useful tool.)