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ExplyExply would certainly have a different connotation than explain, state, declare, or any other synonym you could come up with. Part of it is because in order to make something explicit, one does not need to use words. This would be relevant in a number of situations, particularly when discussing painting, film, theater, dance, or any other number of things where meaning is transferred by showing rather than telling.

In such a situation, I could easily envision saying something like "Painter X's early work implies a sort of religiosity, using line, color, lighting, and pose to mirror religious symbolism and ritual. In his later work, which actually depicts specific Christian sacraments, that religiosity is not just implied; it's explied.":

"Painter X's early work implies a sort of religiosity, using line, color, lighting, and pose to mirror religious symbolism and ritual. In his later work, which actually depicts specific Christian sacraments, that religiosity is not just implied; it's explied."

Now try to swap expliedexplied with any synonym you want, and it doesn't work. You either get extra baggage in the connotations that you don't want, or you get different definitions that change the meaning of the sentence wholesale. Either way, the meaning is changed and you don't get the sentence you want.

Ladies and gentlemen, we have a lacuna :-)

Exply would certainly have a different connotation than explain, state, declare, or any other synonym you could come up with. Part of it is because in order to make something explicit, one does not need to use words. This would be relevant in a number of situations, particularly when discussing painting, film, theater, dance, or any other number of things where meaning is transferred by showing rather than telling.

In such a situation, I could easily envision saying something like "Painter X's early work implies a sort of religiosity, using line, color, lighting, and pose to mirror religious symbolism and ritual. In his later work, which actually depicts specific Christian sacraments, that religiosity is not just implied; it's explied."

Now try to swap explied with any synonym you want, and it doesn't work. You either get extra baggage in the connotations that you don't want, or you get different definitions that change the meaning of the sentence wholesale. Either way, the meaning is changed and you don't get the sentence you want.

Ladies and gentlemen, we have a lacuna :-)

Exply would certainly have a different connotation than explain, state, declare, or any other synonym you could come up with. Part of it is because in order to make something explicit, one does not need to use words. This would be relevant in a number of situations, particularly when discussing painting, film, theater, dance, or any other number of things where meaning is transferred by showing rather than telling.

In such a situation, I could easily envision saying something like:

"Painter X's early work implies a sort of religiosity, using line, color, lighting, and pose to mirror religious symbolism and ritual. In his later work, which actually depicts specific Christian sacraments, that religiosity is not just implied; it's explied."

Now try to swap explied with any synonym you want, and it doesn't work. You either get extra baggage in the connotations that you don't want, or you get different definitions that change the meaning of the sentence wholesale. Either way, the meaning is changed and you don't get the sentence you want.

Ladies and gentlemen, we have a lacuna :-)

1
source | link

Exply would certainly have a different connotation than explain, state, declare, or any other synonym you could come up with. Part of it is because in order to make something explicit, one does not need to use words. This would be relevant in a number of situations, particularly when discussing painting, film, theater, dance, or any other number of things where meaning is transferred by showing rather than telling.

In such a situation, I could easily envision saying something like "Painter X's early work implies a sort of religiosity, using line, color, lighting, and pose to mirror religious symbolism and ritual. In his later work, which actually depicts specific Christian sacraments, that religiosity is not just implied; it's explied."

Now try to swap explied with any synonym you want, and it doesn't work. You either get extra baggage in the connotations that you don't want, or you get different definitions that change the meaning of the sentence wholesale. Either way, the meaning is changed and you don't get the sentence you want.

Ladies and gentlemen, we have a lacuna :-)