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With regards to the query above, whether "It is they who lied." or "It is them who lied.", I stand to the former. My explanation on this matter is a sort of grammatical, but I shall explore it with more of a logical character.

As such, should we analyse the construction of each sentence, we will then be required to divide each with their respective components, that is with this formula: SUBJ + COPULA + PREDICATE.

Hence in each case, they shall be conceivesconceived as:

It is they who lied = (It is they who) + (were) + (lying)*

([It]+[is]+[them who]) + (were) + (lying)**

*Remember that the "they" is a subject pronoun whereas "them" is an object pronoun. As much as "who" is also a subject pronoun. Thence, we should view the 'they' (as well as 'who') as elements belonging to the SUBJ, not as part of the PREDICATE. For this reason I had restructured the sentence to fit on the formula.

**From this analysis of the latter sentence, it appears that there are 2 sets of constructions within a single construction. This is logically invalid should we follow the strict formula mentioned above. Therefore, even the "It is them who were lying" is a sweet-smelling nectar under our very rhetorical noses, its very construction is no less than invalid.

Thus, to follow the logical formula, I assert that what is correct between the two is the "IT IS THEY WHO LIED."

*****I hope this helps. n_n

With regards to the query above, whether "It is they who lied." or "It is them who lied.", I stand to the former. My explanation on this matter is a sort of grammatical, but I shall explore it with more of a logical character.

As such, should we analyse the construction of each sentence, we will then be required to divide each with their respective components, that is with this formula: SUBJ + COPULA + PREDICATE.

Hence in each case, they shall be conceives as:

It is they who lied = (It is they who) + (were) + (lying)*

([It]+[is]+[them who]) + (were) + (lying)**

*Remember that the "they" is a subject pronoun whereas "them" is an object pronoun. As much as "who" is also a subject pronoun. Thence, we should view the 'they' (as well as 'who') as elements belonging to the SUBJ, not as part of the PREDICATE. For this reason I had restructured the sentence to fit on the formula.

**From this analysis of the latter sentence, it appears that there are 2 sets of constructions within a single construction. This is logically invalid should we follow the strict formula mentioned above. Therefore, even the "It is them who were lying" is a sweet-smelling nectar under our very rhetorical noses, its very construction is no less than invalid.

Thus, to follow the logical formula, I assert that what is correct between the two is the "IT IS THEY WHO LIED."

*****I hope this helps. n_n

With regards to the query above, whether "It is they who lied." or "It is them who lied.", I stand to the former. My explanation on this matter is a sort of grammatical, but I shall explore it with more of a logical character.

As such, should we analyse the construction of each sentence, we will then be required to divide each with their respective components, that is with this formula: SUBJ + COPULA + PREDICATE.

Hence in each case, they shall be conceived as:

It is they who lied = (It is they who) + (were) + (lying)*

([It]+[is]+[them who]) + (were) + (lying)**

*Remember that the "they" is a subject pronoun whereas "them" is an object pronoun. As much as "who" is also a subject pronoun. Thence, we should view the 'they' (as well as 'who') as elements belonging to the SUBJ, not as part of the PREDICATE. For this reason I had restructured the sentence to fit on the formula.

**From this analysis of the latter sentence, it appears that there are 2 sets of constructions within a single construction. This is logically invalid should we follow the strict formula mentioned above. Therefore, even the "It is them who were lying" is a sweet-smelling nectar under our very rhetorical noses, its very construction is no less than invalid.

Thus, to follow the logical formula, I assert that what is correct between the two is the "IT IS THEY WHO LIED."

*****I hope this helps. n_n

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With regards to the query above, whether "It is they who lied." or "It is them who lied.", I stand to the former. My explanation on this matter is a sort of grammatical, but I shall explore it with more of a logical character.

As such, should we analyse the construction of each sentence, we will then be required to divide each with their respective components, that is with this formula: SUBJ + COPULA + PREDICATE.

Hence in each case, they shall be conceives as:

It is they who lied = (It is they who) + (were) + (lying)*

([It]+[is]+[them who]) + (were) + (lying)**

*Remember that the "they" is a subject pronoun whereas "them" is an object pronoun. As much as "who" is also a subject pronoun. Thence, we should view the 'they' (as well as 'who') as elements belonging to the SUBJ, not as part of the PREDICATE. For this reason I had restructured the sentence to fit on the formula.

**From this analysis of the latter sentence, it appears that there are 2 sets of constructions within a single construction. This is logically invalid should we follow the strict formula mentioned above. Therefore, even the "It is them who were lying" is a sweet-smelling nectar under our very rhetorical noses, its very construction is no less than invalid.

Thus, to follow the logical formula, I assert that what is correct between the two is the "IT IS THEY WHO LIED."

*****I hope this helps. n_n