2 typo
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Use of a word other than the one intended is broadly a slip of the tongue, though if you want to attribute the substitution to the reveleationrevelation of an unconscious thought, it can be a case of parapraxis, colloquially known as the Freudian slip (Freud's word was Fehlleistungen).

In the example you've provided, where a word is substituted with a similar-sounding word resulting in nonsense, the slip is a malapropism, although for someone like me for whom detecting tension by ear is no less nonsensical than detecting temperature, it might qualify as an eggcorn. If you were repeating a phrase that you had misheard (as from a song or poem), it would be a mondegreen.

Use of a word other than the one intended is broadly a slip of the tongue, though if you want to attribute the substitution to the reveleation of an unconscious thought, it can be a case of parapraxis, colloquially known as the Freudian slip (Freud's word was Fehlleistungen).

In the example you've provided, where a word is substituted with a similar-sounding word resulting in nonsense, the slip is a malapropism, although for someone like me for whom detecting tension by ear is no less nonsensical than detecting temperature, it might qualify as an eggcorn. If you were repeating a phrase that you had misheard (as from a song or poem), it would be a mondegreen.

Use of a word other than the one intended is broadly a slip of the tongue, though if you want to attribute the substitution to the revelation of an unconscious thought, it can be a case of parapraxis, colloquially known as the Freudian slip (Freud's word was Fehlleistungen).

In the example you've provided, where a word is substituted with a similar-sounding word resulting in nonsense, the slip is a malapropism, although for someone like me for whom detecting tension by ear is no less nonsensical than detecting temperature, it might qualify as an eggcorn. If you were repeating a phrase that you had misheard (as from a song or poem), it would be a mondegreen.

1
source | link

Use of a word other than the one intended is broadly a slip of the tongue, though if you want to attribute the substitution to the reveleation of an unconscious thought, it can be a case of parapraxis, colloquially known as the Freudian slip (Freud's word was Fehlleistungen).

In the example you've provided, where a word is substituted with a similar-sounding word resulting in nonsense, the slip is a malapropism, although for someone like me for whom detecting tension by ear is no less nonsensical than detecting temperature, it might qualify as an eggcorn. If you were repeating a phrase that you had misheard (as from a song or poem), it would be a mondegreen.