1,606 reputation
1819
bio website rintaun.tumblr.com
location Pittsburgh, PA
age 27
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen May 13 at 16:12

I graduated from Ohio University in 2011 with a B.A. in Linguistics with a minor in Japanese. Nearly half of my time enrolled at Ohio was spent studying at Chubu University near Nagoya, Japan. I plan eventually to go to graduate school for foreign language education, to become certified to teach Japanese at the secondary level.

In the mean time, however, I program (primarily in PHP and SQL). I also recently began working as a freelance Japanese-to-English translator, though I've translated anime and manga as a hobby in the past.


Mar
7
comment How do you make the possessive form with “He and I”-style subjects?
@user37949 I've recently come to this conclusion as well, and despite sounding odd, I believe it is the proper grammatical answer.
Aug
22
comment How do you make the possessive form with “He and I”-style subjects?
Isn't there a way to do this without rephrasing the entire sentence?
Jul
15
comment Is “many fewer combinations” correct?
@Robusto Although certainly related, I don't think this is a duplicate as it's asking about a different issue (specifically, much vs. many and which is used with "fewer").
Jul
13
comment thrice, twice, once, *zeroce?
@whoabackoff "-fold" doesn't mean "{number} times", but rather "times {number}" (which is significantly different in meaning) and can generally only be used in comparisons, not occurrences.
Jul
4
comment Which of these two sentences is correct (“processes” vs. “process”)?
I think the real question is one you have to answer yourself: are there multiple processes behind your projects, or is there one unifying process behind all of them?
Jul
4
comment “than would be”
@kiamlaluno There's quite a bit more to it than that; there are several other realis moods than simply indicative.
Jul
3
comment “than would be”
@FumbleFingers I agree wholeheartedly with your comment about committing to linguistics.se. There are actually US-based academics weighing in on the matter (or so say my -- admittedly cursory -- searches through LLBA), but really, mood and modality are essentially black magic to me. :) I do agree that this question would be better suited to linguistics.se, however.
Jul
3
comment “than would be”
@Tim: If you are interested, the referenced book is apparently: Palmer, F. R. 1986. Mood and modality. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University.
Jul
3
comment “than would be”
@Tim: The text of the entry from the dictionary I cited is available at this website; I have not read the referenced paper so I cannot give any more specific information. However, the term irrealis mood(s) is not used widely in English grammar, which may be related to the fact that very few of the irrealis moods exist in English (I believe only the conditional and subjunctive moods do). Out of curiosity, and if I may ask: what is your native language?
Jul
3
comment “than would be”
@mplungjan: From a semantic viewpoint, it conveys the same information, but I felt as if @Tim wanted something which was deleted, rather than simply rephrasing the second half of each sentence.
Jul
3
comment “than would be”
@FumbleFingers: realis and irrealis moods are discussed in other sources than Wikipedia, including Semantics by John I. Saeed and The prominence of tense, aspect, and mood by D. N. Shankara Bhat (among others). A Dictionary of Grammatical Terms in Linguistics also contains a definition, though it notes that at least one source recommends against its use -- however, it is an actual term. I don't see why this should be closed, per se.
Jul
3
comment “than would be”
@kiamlaluno, Irrealis mood
Jun
29
comment “To enable him to escape” vs. “to enable him escape”
It depends on what verb is used; with enable as in your example above, I would say the "to" is required. If you use "help" instead, I would say that it is not. I don't know off the top of my head why this is, but it may have something to do theta roles.
Jun
29
comment Why “themselves” and “himself”
@RiMMER @Seth It has something to do with the accusative/dative cases in Old English merging to become the objective in Middle English, but I'm not well-versed enough in the deep history of our language to really provide a full answer.
Jun
28
comment Why “themselves” and “himself”
I don't know if this actually answers the question. Why, if all other forms are formed from [posessive] + self (see note), is it himself and themselves. I believe I remember being told in one of my linguistics classes that hisself and theirselves were the original forms, and then later changed. Note: I would argue that herself is formed from the possessive "her", not the objective. Additionally, I would argue that in itself and oneself, the "s" of the possessive is simply being reduced, as it appears next to the "s" of "self".
Jun
27
comment Are double negatives ever appropriate in English?
@Ham and Bacon: "No, it is never correct." That's a grammatical double negative right there. At least, more or less.
Jun
27
comment Are double negatives ever appropriate in English?
Out of curiosity, was irony your intention?
Jun
26
comment I've been through that stage “ages ago” or “ages before”
@Daisy: As I said in my answer, "I went through that stage ages ago" would probably work nicely. Alternately, you could use "years ago," "forever ago," or any similar expression.
Jun
25
comment “Apache are” or “Apache is”?
@Peter Yes, I suppose that is what I meant. Sorry about that.
Jun
25
comment Pronunciation of “Wales” and “whales” in Scotland
+1 for fighting for linguistic equality! ...and a great answer. :)