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  • 47 votes cast
Apr
2
comment Is it “falsy” or “falsey”?
@MarkDBlackwell In addition to Hot Licks' response, I'd say that "dump" in the CS sense, both as noun and verb, is merely another application of its preexisting meanings even without the vulgar one, particularly the ones related to unloading/releasing contents. (For example, "dump truck".)
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jun
17
awarded  Caucus
Jun
17
awarded  Constituent
May
22
comment What is the opposite of a monopoly?
But that rhetorical question was not the one being asked. If anything, I'd consider your word to be the inverse of monopoly rather than the opposite in terms of the question as asked.
May
21
awarded  Critic
May
21
comment What is the opposite of a monopoly?
This would be better suited as an answer to a different question as the definition does not match the description given in the question.
Apr
23
comment What is the term for repeating something in an A, B, A fashion? (e.g. “Just the facts, ma'am, just the facts.”)
@mikeTheLiar Not necessarily. While it's a trivial case, you can have only one iteration when iterating, so "to reiterate" can mean "to perform another iteration" (and in fact, when multiple iterations are involved in the act of iterating, "to reiterate" would be more likely to mean performing all of those iterations again rather than just the last one).
Feb
26
comment Why do Americans add “The” in front of a team name, but the British do not?
I'd use "Red Soc" (not to be confused with "Red Sock") for a singular player, but that's just me.
Feb
6
comment A non-offensive term to call a lunatic?
I thought sociopaths generally tended to be high-functioning anyway.
Jan
23
comment What do you call unclean water that you can't see through?
@JanusBahsJacquet Now that you mention it, I think that is a big part of it too.
Jan
23
comment What do you call unclean water that you can't see through?
How odd, I've always associated "turbid" with a decrease in visibility caused by disturbance of the liquid itself (i.e. rough water) rather than any particulate matter or solute within it. I guess that happens sometimes when you only base your understanding of a word off of the various contexts you encounter it in rather than looking it up in the dictionary.
Dec
27
comment Is there a word for “air can pass through it”?
@ShreevatsaR That's not the only example of such confusion in English, though. See "flammable" vs. "inflammable", etc.
Jul
20
comment What is the meaning of “don't mention it” (in response to “thank you”)?
What if you really do want to have lunch with the person? Does it still count as a phatic expression?
Jul
14
comment Is there a term I can use for a boss's favorite employee?
@crowne, PSU: Some people might take offense at those, though.
Jul
14
answered Is there a term I can use for a boss's favorite employee?
Jul
13
comment An adjective for “able to see the big picture”
I like sagacious, personally.
Jul
13
comment What is the meaning associated to a baseball and a screw?
As my eye was scanning down the page, I went "screw... ball... Oh, screwball!" right before I saw your answer. Gave me a bit of a chuckle.
Jul
7
awarded  Commentator
Jul
7
comment When should I use “in” or “on”?
Just a note, but the bed thing may make more sense if you consider the coverings of the bed to be grouped together with the bed in such statements. It's why I think of someone being "in bed" when they're under the covers, but "on the bed" if they're on top of the covers. When the bed has no covers, it's undefined behavior.