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age 24
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Apr 9 at 15:56

I'm a science fiction & fantasy buff and casual tabletop gamer, recently graduated with bachelor's degrees in Computer Engineering and Computer Science (and a Japanese minor on the side).

Python and C++ are currently my preferred programming languages, but I've done some work with Objective-C (iOS apps) and some projects in Javascript (node.js, jQuery, etc.). I have possibly had more experience with Java than with Python or C++, but I have found that tasks that are comparatively elegant in Python and other languages that share similar design concepts (first-class functions, etc.) often require an annoying amount of boilerplate in Java (thankfully, Java 8's lambdas and method references seem like they'll alleviate a decent amount of my annoyances in that regard); I also wish Java had either reified generics or at least a bit more support for static/compile-time code generation like with C++'s templates (at the very least, method overriding based on runtime type would allow a whole lot of Java code that interfaces with non-generic/primitives-only APIs to be less verbose). I'm also trying out Scala and LISP, though I haven't made much progress on that recently.


Feb
26
comment Why do Americans add “The” in front of a team name, but the British do not?
I'd use "Red Soc" (not to be confused with "Red Sock") for a singular player, but that's just me.
Feb
6
comment A non-offensive term to call a lunatic?
I thought sociopaths generally tended to be high-functioning anyway.
Jan
23
comment What do you call unclean water that you can't see through?
@JanusBahsJacquet Now that you mention it, I think that is a big part of it too.
Jan
23
comment What do you call unclean water that you can't see through?
How odd, I've always associated "turbid" with a decrease in visibility caused by disturbance of the liquid itself (i.e. rough water) rather than any particulate matter or solute within it. I guess that happens sometimes when you only base your understanding of a word off of the various contexts you encounter it in rather than looking it up in the dictionary.
Dec
27
comment Is there a word for “air can pass through it”?
@ShreevatsaR That's not the only example of such confusion in English, though. See "flammable" vs. "inflammable", etc.
Jul
20
comment What is the meaning of “don't mention it” (in response to “thank you”)?
What if you really do want to have lunch with the person? Does it still count as a phatic expression?
Jul
14
comment Is there a term I can use for a boss's favorite employee?
@crowne, PSU: Some people might take offense at those, though.
Jul
14
answered Is there a term I can use for a boss's favorite employee?
Jul
13
comment An adjective for “able to see the big picture”
I like sagacious, personally.
Jul
13
comment What is the meaning associated to a baseball and a screw?
As my eye was scanning down the page, I went "screw... ball... Oh, screwball!" right before I saw your answer. Gave me a bit of a chuckle.
Jul
7
awarded  Commentator
Jul
7
comment When should I use “in” or “on”?
Just a note, but the bed thing may make more sense if you consider the coverings of the bed to be grouped together with the bed in such statements. It's why I think of someone being "in bed" when they're under the covers, but "on the bed" if they're on top of the covers. When the bed has no covers, it's undefined behavior.
Jul
7
comment What is a good substitute for “echoey”?
I wouldn't really go with "resonant", personally. The connotation is a bit different than with "reverberant", even if there is some overlap.
Jul
6
comment Where did the “ue” in “tongue” come from?
"this word was originally spelt 'tounge'" Does that mean the rogue -> rouge mispelling that so many people in online games do will eventually make its way into the English language proper?
Jul
6
comment “Figment” other than in “figment of the imagination”?
Now that I think about it, I wonder if "Figment" would make a good name.
Jul
6
comment What is the difference between “illicit” and “illegal”?
So something like "Henry, currently attending boarding school, made an illicit trip to town"? The trip isn't illegal itself, but is against the policy of the boarding school.
Jul
6
comment What is an expression for something you particularly like?
If gentlemen prefer blondes, who prefers redheads?
Jun
23
comment Is there a term to describe speech that has a hidden meaning but is not sarcastic?
"Ironic doesn't refer to something that happens contrary to expectations or justice." Depends on what sort of irony you're talking about, unless my memory of high-school English fails me.
Jun
20
comment Antonym of “Landed with a thud”?
@Colin: "For instance quite, which meant 'clear' or 'free' in Middle English, can mean 'slightly' (quite nice) or completely' (quite beautiful)." ...I always thought "quite nice" meant "very nice".
Jun
17
awarded  Teacher