661 reputation
2816
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location Denver, CO
age 39
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Nov 14 at 21:27

Oct
6
comment What would be the best word for a single sweepstakes within a set of sweepstakes?
That's the name for the set, while an individual instance we're calling selection. At least, I think that's what we'll do.
Oct
6
comment What would be the best word for a single sweepstakes within a set of sweepstakes?
With a lot of internal discussion previous to and since posting the question, we've decided on drawing.
Oct
6
comment Is there a comma needed before quotation?
Had you omitted the word "entitled," it would then take a comma: Sam developed an annual sweepstakes promotion, "The Free Gas Punt Return Game."
Jun
12
comment Would the adjectival form of “on the premises” be on-premise, on premise, or on-premises?
I remember the days when I went by that correct definition. I'm so enculturated now…
May
25
comment Why does “puce” mean two different colors depending on where you live?
@tchrist, it's sounding more like that is the case. Should that go in as an answer? Or should I change the question? I'm still curious to know why green is where people mistakenly go.
May
24
comment Why does “puce” mean two different colors depending on where you live?
@hugo The atomic tangerine matches my fallible memory best. How could two articles on the Internet have conflicting information? LOL
May
24
comment Definition of Thrilla with Vanilla
Are you sure they didn't mean "Thrilla in Manila" … the Ali vs. Frazier boxing match?
May
24
comment Why does “puce” mean two different colors depending on where you live?
It seems I am mistaken about Crayola. It was a fluorescent yellow they called chartreuse. Not wrong, but not right. If enough people have the wrong definition, when does it become an alternate meaning?
May
24
comment Why does “puce” mean two different colors depending on where you live?
I love the sawdonkey story. And it turns out somebody agreed with the definition: youtube.com/watch?v=hbwsFKCUZpA.
May
24
comment Why does “puce” mean two different colors depending on where you live?
@tchrist, the crayola multi-pack labeled an orange crayon with "chartreuse" for years.
May
24
comment Why does “puce” mean two different colors depending on where you live?
@Hugo, I've known for a long time that I was confused about my definition of puce. I assumed it was green, looked it up and found it was brown-purple, but found today people from England telling me they remember it as green. So, it's mostly just been confusing and I finally had to do some research.
May
24
comment Why does “puce” mean two different colors depending on where you live?
@GEdgar, you would think, hence the question.
May
24
comment Why does “puce” mean two different colors depending on where you live?
The discussion on Wikipedia verigies what you're saying under the section for "puce green": en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk%3APuce
May
24
comment Why does “puce” mean two different colors depending on where you live?
The question is why is it thought of differently in different parts of the world? And more importantly, where did the "green" come from?
May
17
comment Which has stronger sexual connotations, “corset” or “bustier”?
They're looking for the keyword hits.
May
17
comment Which has stronger sexual connotations, “corset” or “bustier”?
Sorry, I just misspelled it. Edited.
May
17
comment Which has stronger sexual connotations, “corset” or “bustier”?
@cornbreadninja I agree … but how might I make this a more constructive question?
Apr
19
comment Verb for increasing the vertical dimension of a space?
If they're digging the floor, you would say they're "deepening" the tunnel. Although, out of context that would imply tunneling deeper into something, like the side of a mountain.
Jan
7
comment What is an alternative to “Bless you” after sneezing?
As an aside, the French sometimes use a sequence of responses to multiple sneezes: "to your wishes" … "to your loves" … [exasperated] "to your death."
Jan
7
comment “Bless you” & sneezing
@Benjamin This video is NSFW due to language, but it does a good job of lampooning the social mores regarding sneezing here in the U.S.: collegehumor.com/video/3115033/jake-and-amir-bless-you