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location Denver, CO
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visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Nov 14 at 21:27

Jan
6
comment What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
That's unfortunate. I didn't find any antonyms listed in dictionaries, and Googling didn't reveal much. I don't see consensus here, so I'm inclined to believe the answer isn't so simple. Regardless, I appreciate the feedback … helps me understand.
Jan
6
comment What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
Do you have any feedback that would help for the future?
Jan
6
comment What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
Seven people so far think this question is worth answering, but only one person thinks to downvote it. Interesting. Any feedback I should hear?
Jan
6
comment What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
Ab but, parse sounds like it's a necessary step to properly "splitting," judging from its use in computing as a type of analysis. Ironically, analyze literally means to cut apart, but it is more likened to the measuring that happens before any cutting.
Jan
6
comment What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
Question edited to clarify.
Jan
6
revised What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
clarified that I'm after the opposite action, rather than the antonym … slightly different things
Jan
5
comment What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
I guess the real action of reversing a concatenation would involve parsing, since the splits need to fall in places that make sense. That is, you can mindlessly concatenate, but it requires intelligence to pull things back apart. That doesn't make it an antonym, but that does make it the opposite.
Jan
5
comment Would the adjectival form of “on the premises” be on-premise, on premise, or on-premises?
I think in general I would agree. In my industry (shopping centers), on-premise is the term used most. On-site is not something I hear much and could be confused for the websites of the malls.
Jan
5
comment What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
That has a more natural feel as an antonym; concatenate is so formal while split so informal … parse sounds like the perfect nemesis.
Jan
5
awarded  Commentator
Jan
5
comment What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
Etymologically speaking, uncatenate makes more sense than catenate. At least it means to un-"chain".
Jan
5
asked What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
Jan
4
comment Pronunciation of verbiage and foliage
George W. Bush pronounces it \ˈfō-lij\.
Jan
4
revised Would the adjectival form of “on the premises” be on-premise, on premise, or on-premises?
shortened title
Jan
4
asked Would the adjectival form of “on the premises” be on-premise, on premise, or on-premises?
Nov
16
comment What is the preferred plural form of “bus”?
Or the present tense (3rd person) of to bus.
Nov
11
comment What's the difference between “big” and “large”?
Big predates large in Middle English: large came over from Norman French. Large is regarded as more formal than big, as are most English words coming from Norman French, because it was the royalty and upper classes that used these words the most while they entered the English language.
Nov
7
comment Is there a word for a change so small that it doesn’t seem to be a change at all?
@zano I see. So, not really a common parlance, more like a connotation among some groups of people.
Nov
4
comment Is there a word for a change so small that it doesn’t seem to be a change at all?
@zano, can you cite that? I've never seen or heard that parlance. Unless you mean those definitions the way some people might say "government" has come to mean some of those same things.
Oct
11
comment How can I describe someone who changes clothes frequently?
Or "changes her clothes to excess."