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May
24
revised Why does “puce” mean two different colors depending on where you live?
clarifying question
May
24
comment Why does “puce” mean two different colors depending on where you live?
The question is why is it thought of differently in different parts of the world? And more importantly, where did the "green" come from?
May
24
asked Why does “puce” mean two different colors depending on where you live?
May
17
revised Which has stronger sexual connotations, “corset” or “bustier”?
spelling (my bad)
May
17
suggested approved edit on Which has stronger sexual connotations, “corset” or “bustier”?
May
17
comment Which has stronger sexual connotations, “corset” or “bustier”?
They're looking for the keyword hits.
May
17
comment Which has stronger sexual connotations, “corset” or “bustier”?
Sorry, I just misspelled it. Edited.
May
17
revised Which has stronger sexual connotations, “corset” or “bustier”?
tightening the question … and spelling.
May
17
comment Which has stronger sexual connotations, “corset” or “bustier”?
@cornbreadninja I agree … but how might I make this a more constructive question?
May
17
asked Which has stronger sexual connotations, “corset” or “bustier”?
Apr
19
comment Verb for increasing the vertical dimension of a space?
If they're digging the floor, you would say they're "deepening" the tunnel. Although, out of context that would imply tunneling deeper into something, like the side of a mountain.
Feb
9
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
8
awarded  Good Question
Jan
7
comment What is an alternative to “Bless you” after sneezing?
As an aside, the French sometimes use a sequence of responses to multiple sneezes: "to your wishes" … "to your loves" … [exasperated] "to your death."
Jan
7
comment “Bless you” & sneezing
@Benjamin This video is NSFW due to language, but it does a good job of lampooning the social mores regarding sneezing here in the U.S.: collegehumor.com/video/3115033/jake-and-amir-bless-you
Jan
7
comment Did English ever have a formal version of “you”?
@RegDwightѬſ道 A southerner explained to me that when addressing a single person, "y'all" is a familiar form of address, while "all y'all" is something said to people not well known. It's not so much formality as it is insider status. Coming from Maryland, I consider the youse/y'all isogloss the true line of demarcation between North and South.
Jan
6
revised What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
clarified question title
Jan
6
comment Difference between “validation” and “verification”
It seems validate carries the weight of authority. "The clerical staff verified the data, but it wasn't official until the administrator validated it."
Jan
6
answered Word denoting short description of the event
Jan
6
comment What method of counting puts Twelfth Night on January 6th?
Could it have anything to do with the Jewish custom in which a day begins at sunset? That is, the Sabbath celebrated on Saturday begins Friday evening.