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seen Jul 9 '12 at 9:47

Feb
14
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
6
awarded  Yearling
Sep
12
comment Is there an idiom for people who boast too much?
A variant of this is tooting your own horn.
Aug
29
comment The times they are a-changin'
+1 for the examples of along, about, around, and abreast -- I hadn't thought of a- as being a prefix in those before.
Jul
20
comment Is “wot wot” or “what-what” an authentic British expression? If it's supposed to be mocking, what is it mocking?
I always thought what what was a "gangster" expression: urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=what%20what
Jul
19
comment Do Americans understand Donald Duck?
I agree with Martha -- I just watched the first couple of minutes of that video, and the only word Donald Duck said that I understood was "okay". And it's not just that I couldn't understand him -- I wouldn't even have recognized he was speaking English. (Contrast this with listening to songs: a lot of times, I can't recognize the words, but I can still tell they're speaking English.)
Jul
3
answered Difference between “recently” and “lately”
Jun
30
comment Precedence of “and” and “or”
@Fumble: Oh, I agree. I was just rewording aioobe's enumeration in the comment, ignoring the actual words.
Jun
30
comment Precedence of “and” and “or”
Another option is to go for a slight repetition: "Will it be cold and rain today, or will it be cold and snow?" (I find this easier to parse than the enumeration.)
Jun
29
comment Do you say 'white blackboard'?
I differentiate between whiteboards and dry-erase boards: the larger ones (such as you might find in a classroom) are usually "whiteboards" (though "dry-erase boards" also works), but smaller ones (like in the picture in this answer) are always "dry-erase boards" (calling it a "whiteboard" seems a bit funny to me). Does anyone else do this?
Jun
29
comment In what region is “thou”, etc. used in dialect?
What does that mean?
Jun
24
comment What does the word “only” mean in this sentence?
I disagree with kiamlaluno that this sentence can only have one interpretation. It's true that in this case the second interpretation is probably the correct one (based on what I know about stack pointers), but I can get both readings. For example, try "We only need to remember Chapter 12 for the test" (most likely means interpretation 1: the only thing we need to remember for the test is the contents of Chapter 12; interpretation 2 is possible as well, but the meaning is less likely).
Jun
24
comment What is a synonym for “girlfriend”?
I'm not sure "mistress" is a good synonym. For me, at least, it has a (somewhat salacious) meaning that goes beyond a connotation.
Jun
21
awarded  Teacher
Jun
21
comment “I am thinking to invest” or “I am thinking investing”?
@MT_Head: Those are bigrams (i.e., "invest" immediately followed by "into"), though, so if my transitive theory is right, that's to be expected =).
Jun
21
comment “I am thinking to invest” or “I am thinking investing”?
@MT_Head: for me, at least, certain "investing into" constructions sound fine (e.g., "I'm thinking of investing all my money into this savings account"), though "I'm thinking of investing into stocks" does sound off. (Maybe it depends on whether "invest" is used intransitively or transitively?)
Jun
21
awarded  Commentator
Jun
21
comment “I am thinking to invest” or “I am thinking investing”?
In other words, before this thread, I'd have put it in the "I are hungry" bucket (something I can't imagine any native speaker saying), not in the "I ain't hungry" or "I must needs be gone" bucket. (I'm not sure I quite agree that the first sentence is a "fairly common structure" in places other than the Southeast UK =).)
Jun
21
comment “I am thinking to invest” or “I am thinking investing”?
@FumbleFingers: I don't think Feral was necessarily trying to be overly prescriptivist (hopefully I'm not putting words in anyone's mouth!), but rather that "I am thinking to invest in stocks" really does sound horribly ungrammatical in many dialects. (I had no idea anybody would ever say that: before this thread, if I'd seen you writing it, I'd have immediately assumed you weren't a native speaker.)
Jun
21
answered What are some examples of awkward sounding but grammatically correct sentences?