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Jul
8
comment Principles in the use of letters 'b', 'u' and 'v' in Early Modern English typography
@PLL I would expect the "b" to have a straight ascender, like the "h" in the first image; the v-with-ascender is more a swash than an ascender. File:Old_English_typeface.svg from the Wikimedia Commons shows what I mean (albeit in a modern recreation font), as does the Wikipedia article Fette Fraktur (though this is a German font, rather than an English one).
Jun
8
comment What is the English term for a word meaning a shortened/contracted version of itself?
@TusharRaj Another term (and concept) I have never encountered before. What a great term. Thank you! :)
Jun
8
comment What is the English term for a word meaning a shortened/contracted version of itself?
As a 39-year-old native [British] English speaker, I have never heard this term before. It's a cute term for an intriguing concept, but I've never heard it used — or had the concept pointed out to me before reading this answer.
Apr
13
comment Why is the movie named “Hot Fuzz”?
It could, but I'm not sure why it would be — there's no particular reason for it in the context of the film plot, surely?
Apr
13
comment Why is the movie named “Hot Fuzz”?
We have a hot fudge sundae, but it's not a term with any particular cultural resonance over here.
Mar
27
comment What is the name of the tactic that politicians use to bury people with torrent of words?
@Izkata I think that distinction is paper-thin. To my mind, "It reminds me of a tactic politicians use to waste people's time. I came across this word before but I can't retrieve it from either memory or the internet." suggested that the OP was asking for the word about the political tactic in particular.
Mar
27
comment What is the name of the tactic that politicians use to bury people with torrent of words?
Lovely word, but not the correct answer; filibustering (per David M below) is the specific term for the political tactic, which is what I understood the question to be asking.
Mar
26
awarded  Necromancer
Mar
26
awarded  Yearling
Mar
23
revised What we've gelost — why doesn't English use the prefix “ge-”?
Corrected the Wikipedia link (as someone has presumably changed the anchor there); linked High German to make the character limit
Mar
23
suggested approved edit on What we've gelost — why doesn't English use the prefix “ge-”?
Jul
31
awarded  Caucus
Mar
14
comment How do you pronounce “fifths”?
@JonPurdy That was me doing IPA quickly, without looking it up, whilst I was meant to be doing something else, so I would guess (a) that my |æ| should have been an |a| and I just didn't think hard enough and (b) that I apparently have |ɛ| and |e| mixed up in my head, as Wikipedia:IPA for French would suggest is indeed the case. How odd that I've never noticed this before now — thanks for pointing it out! :o)
Mar
14
comment How do you pronounce “fifths”?
(Actually, my accent is probably somewhere between RP and Estuarine, rather than "broadly Estuarine", thinking about it.)
Mar
14
comment How do you pronounce “fifths”?
But almost all of those complex clusters get reduced. My (broadly) Estuarine pronunciation of those would be /æŋsts/, /twɛɫθs/, /sɪkθs/, /kloʊ(ð)z/, /maʊðz/, /strɛŋθs/ and /brɛstroʊk/. (Though I'd say the E sound is closer to |e| than |ɛ|, which I think of as more like the French pronunciation of café /kæfɛ/, personally.)
Feb
26
comment Do people in Miami really talk like they do in the television series “Dexter”?
Not just American English either — all the examples in the question and in this answer (including the pitch variation on mouth-closed I don't know) would be perfectly well-understood to my British English ears. Indeed, I'd always assumed such ellipsis to be quite common: the French je ne sais pas is usually rendered /ˈʃɛˌpɑ/ (*j'sais pas) in conversation, for example. They're the kinds of things you get used to with practice at listening to native speakers, I guess.
Feb
26
suggested rejected edit on Stop if you feel faint or pain!
Feb
26
comment Can you grammatically end a sentence with “with”?
(If it makes a difference, my native British English is likely to be skewed to West Country dialects, where it's relatively common for the preposition to to be added to then ends of sentences, eg "Where did you get that to?", so it might just be a function of that dialectic usage.)
Feb
26
comment Can you grammatically end a sentence with “with”?
As I just mentioned on a comment to "What are the limitations on the “needs washed” construction?", where the comments went onto a tangent about precisely this usage, "Do you want to come with?" and "I'll come with" are forms I've heard in British English. Whilst they'd be considered (very) informal, I think they'd be widely understood.
Feb
26
comment Central Pennsylvanian English speakers: what are the limitations on the “needs washed” construction?
For what it's worth, "Do you want to come with?" and "I'll come with" are forms I've heard in British English. Whilst they'd be considered (very) informal, I think they'd be widely understood.