221 reputation
29
bio website owenblacker.wordpress.com
location London, United Kingdom
age 39
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Nov 21 at 18:05

Technical lead at an ad agency and Umbraco Certified Developer. Director and trustee of mySociety and a director of the Open Rights Group, having sat on the Advisory Council since the organisation was created. Also an avid Wikipedian.


Chef de développement chez une agence de publicité, certifié en Umbraco. Administrateur de la société et de la RUP de mySociety et administrateur de la société de l'Open Rights Group, ayant membre du Conseil Consultatif depuis l'organisation fut créée. En plus, suis éditeur des Wikipédias. Je peux contribuer avec un niveau avancé de français, mais plutôt j'utilise l'anglais, ma langue maternelle.


Blog: owenblacker.wordpress.com
Twitter: @owenblacker
Facebook: owenblacker.uk
LinkedIn: owenblacker
Wikipedia: User:OwenBlacker


Apr
13
comment Why is the movie named “Hot Fuzz”?
It could, but I'm not sure why it would be — there's no particular reason for it in the context of the film plot, surely?
Apr
13
comment Why is the movie named “Hot Fuzz”?
We have a hot fudge sundae, but it's not a term with any particular cultural resonance over here.
Mar
27
comment What is the name of the tactic that politicians use to bury people with torrent of words?
@Izkata I think that distinction is paper-thin. To my mind, "It reminds me of a tactic politicians use to waste people's time. I came across this word before but I can't retrieve it from either memory or the internet." suggested that the OP was asking for the word about the political tactic in particular.
Mar
27
comment What is the name of the tactic that politicians use to bury people with torrent of words?
Lovely word, but not the correct answer; filibustering (per David M below) is the specific term for the political tactic, which is what I understood the question to be asking.
Mar
26
awarded  Necromancer
Mar
26
awarded  Yearling
Mar
23
revised What we've gelost — why doesn't English use the prefix “ge-”?
Corrected the Wikipedia link (as someone has presumably changed the anchor there); linked High German to make the character limit
Mar
23
suggested suggested edit on What we've gelost — why doesn't English use the prefix “ge-”?
Jul
31
awarded  Caucus
Mar
14
comment How do you pronounce “fifths”?
@JonPurdy That was me doing IPA quickly, without looking it up, whilst I was meant to be doing something else, so I would guess (a) that my |æ| should have been an |a| and I just didn't think hard enough and (b) that I apparently have |ɛ| and |e| mixed up in my head, as Wikipedia:IPA for French would suggest is indeed the case. How odd that I've never noticed this before now — thanks for pointing it out! :o)
Mar
14
comment How do you pronounce “fifths”?
(Actually, my accent is probably somewhere between RP and Estuarine, rather than "broadly Estuarine", thinking about it.)
Mar
14
comment How do you pronounce “fifths”?
But almost all of those complex clusters get reduced. My (broadly) Estuarine pronunciation of those would be /æŋsts/, /twɛɫθs/, /sɪkθs/, /kloʊ(ð)z/, /maʊðz/, /strɛŋθs/ and /brɛstroʊk/. (Though I'd say the E sound is closer to |e| than |ɛ|, which I think of as more like the French pronunciation of café /kæfɛ/, personally.)
Feb
26
comment Do people in Miami really talk like they do in the television series “Dexter”?
Not just American English either — all the examples in the question and in this answer (including the pitch variation on mouth-closed I don't know) would be perfectly well-understood to my British English ears. Indeed, I'd always assumed such ellipsis to be quite common: the French je ne sais pas is usually rendered /ˈʃɛˌpɑ/ (*j'sais pas) in conversation, for example. They're the kinds of things you get used to with practice at listening to native speakers, I guess.
Feb
26
suggested suggested edit on Stop if you feel faint or pain!
Feb
26
comment Can you grammatically end a sentence with “with”?
(If it makes a difference, my native British English is likely to be skewed to West Country dialects, where it's relatively common for the preposition to to be added to then ends of sentences, eg "Where did you get that to?", so it might just be a function of that dialectic usage.)
Feb
26
comment Can you grammatically end a sentence with “with”?
As I just mentioned on a comment to "What are the limitations on the “needs washed” construction?", where the comments went onto a tangent about precisely this usage, "Do you want to come with?" and "I'll come with" are forms I've heard in British English. Whilst they'd be considered (very) informal, I think they'd be widely understood.
Feb
26
comment Central Pennsylvanian English speakers: what are the limitations on the “needs washed” construction?
For what it's worth, "Do you want to come with?" and "I'll come with" are forms I've heard in British English. Whilst they'd be considered (very) informal, I think they'd be widely understood.
Feb
26
revised Can a noun (such as “duct tape”) be used as a verb?
Formatting
Feb
26
suggested suggested edit on Can a noun (such as “duct tape”) be used as a verb?
Feb
25
comment How to pronounce “tuple”?
In dialects of English that have not experienced yod dropping (and still make a distinction between the words dew and do, such as RP), you will also hear /tjupəl/, which is how I would pronounce the word. I have often (in London) heard /tupəl/, though I have never heard /tʌpəl/. (I'm with tchrist on that one ;o)