1,647 reputation
412
bio website ryanhaberphotography.com
location Bethesda, MD
age 37
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Nov 25 '13 at 19:36

I'm a technical writer at MicroStrategy in Vienna, VA.

I like running 5k, 8k, 10k, and marathons; watching movies; and reading philosophy or novels. My favorite activity, though, is hiking/backpacking/camping in wild areas and faraway lands ranging from Cambodia to my own backyard. And bringing my camera along is likely to make anything into pure joy.


Jan
14
comment What word means “the people in one's life”?
@Robusto, acquaintances has a similar problem, doesn't it? To refer to one's wife and children, specifically, as acquaintances is a pretty horrible understatement. That said, of course they are among one's acquaintances.
Jan
14
comment The “of” in “the month of January”
@coleopterist, the NGram wasn't to prove anything, really. You wrote, "But it has nevertheless become acceptable through regular use." If that's true, and so is the NGram, then it must have become acceptable some time ago, but usage has been declining for 200 years, apparently.
Jan
8
comment The “of” in “the month of January”
@coleopterist, Well, kinda, except Mexico, for example, has a few gulfs. There's no obvious reason why one should be Mexico's Gulf and the others not. For that matter, there is no place called "Good Hope" that might be the metaphorical owner of the Cape of Good Hope.
Jan
8
comment The “of” in “the month of January”
I think the contrast between Romance usage and Germanic usage, given above, is a far better starting point for speculation. According to ngrams (tinyurl.com/b4vdrvu) "month of X" phrases have been declining in use, not increasing, over the last 200 years or so.
Jan
3
comment Word for people easily influenced by propaganda
Fair enough, @FumbleFingers.
Dec
26
comment What tense is “If I were a bird, I could fly”
Understood. Looking for an easy guide for someone trying to figure out how to make the construction. Really, it's any non-first person formation, but to say, "Use the past plural" yields the correct result.
Dec
20
comment Word for people easily influenced by propaganda
Fair enough. I think my use still works, though. wordreference.com/thesaurus/sheepish
Dec
19
comment Usage difference between modest vs decent?
The sentence itself gives no context. Except to compare the word modest to decent, and ask whether the comparison is appropriate.
Dec
19
comment Usage difference between modest vs decent?
@Marthaª, Merriam-Webster disagrees: mod·est [mod-ist] adjective 1. having or showing a moderate or humble estimate of one's merits, importance, etc.; free from vanity, egotism, boastfulness, or great pretensions. 2. free from ostentation or showy extravagance: a modest house. 3. having or showing regard for the decencies of behavior, speech, dress, etc.; decent: a modest neckline on a dress. 4. limited or moderate in amount, extent, etc.: a modest increase in salary.
Dec
4
comment Does 'turn off (a person)' always have a sexual connotation?
Lolol. Too right.
Dec
4
comment Does 'turn off (a person)' always have a sexual connotation?
Martha is right. We don't use the expression repel against and repel really doesn't do a double object. Her prejudice is especially good for a formal setting like an interview.
Nov
29
comment Plural of “Animus/Anima”
OED. Good call. Without the OED mine makes sense, but as usual, I yield to the scholarly gentlemen from the Mother Country.
Nov
29
comment Is “Prewin” a well-received English word?
Well, the hyphen us used to make a compound modifier in cases where it would otherwise be unclear which modifier is modifying which. This is especially important when nouns are being used as modifiers, in technical settings, settings where clarity is critical or where idiomatic understanding cannot be relied upon. "Well-" is an example of this form.
Nov
29
comment Is “Prewin” a well-received English word?
The reason why "prewin" doesn't work orthographically, Oishi-san, is because it would be pronounced aloud with both syllables stressed, but in writing it as it is, we wouldn't expect both syllables to be stressed. If someone didn't know what Dowd meant, they would mispronounce it, probably. It should be hyphenated if it must be used at all.
Nov
29
comment Is “Prewin” a well-received English word?
Hmm... Maybe. But "pre-" is a pretty common prefix and is a part of lots of compounds.
Nov
28
comment Is “Prewin” a well-received English word?
@ColinFine, I edited my response to limit myself to the question itself, and set aside my knee jerk reaction to the creator of the word.
Nov
28
comment Is “Prewin” a well-received English word?
I never mention Ms. Dowd's character, or even say anything that could be construed to reflect upon her character. "Prewin" is an ugly compound and fails the basic test of immediately recognizable pronunciation.
Nov
6
comment Word for “reading carefully”
Just so. It is also used incorrectly to mean browse. The correct meaning of peruse is the opposite of skim, but people have used it to mean skim by sort transposition of meaning. People hear it being used for reading, and without being attentive to the kind of reading, use it again for a different, indeed opposite, kind of reading.
Sep
22
comment Is it rude to say “how did you end up here”?
@J.R., I may have been overly sensitive - I can see your reading too. You're right about the lower case. It's sooo hard to tell online, isn't it?
Sep
21
comment Is it rude to say “how did you end up here”?
@J.R. presumably NewProger is taking English classes because he or she is school-aged or a non-native speaker. Take it easy.