1,657 reputation
414
bio website ryanhaberphotography.com
location Bethesda, MD
age 37
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Sep 16 at 2:11

I'm a technical writer at MicroStrategy in Vienna, VA.

I like running 5k, 8k, 10k, and marathons; watching movies; and reading philosophy or novels. My favorite activity, though, is hiking/backpacking/camping in wild areas and faraway lands ranging from Cambodia to my own backyard. And bringing my camera along is likely to make anything into pure joy.


Jun
23
comment Is there a term to describe speech that has a hidden meaning but is not sarcastic?
Hmmm... I don't think so. I'm gonna stand fast on this one, JAB. We speak very loosely of "poetic irony," but only in the same way that we speak of "poetic justice." In reality, when we use these phrases, the words poetic, irony, and justice are all being used somewhat loosely or analogously.
Jun
23
comment If Christopher is a “carrier of Christ” then what is Jennifer carrying?
And the v/b misspellings are common. As a non-native speaker, I learned Spanish from 20 years of regular study. I memorized the spellings of words as I learned them. Native speakers who are not well educated very often make these misspellings - not necessarily in very common or easy words, like vivir, though I've seen that, but certainly in difficult words. Sometimes, there is overcorrection as well, i.e., words that ought to be spelled with a b are spelled with a v. Kinda cool, huh?
Jun
23
comment If Christopher is a “carrier of Christ” then what is Jennifer carrying?
Just so. In fact, before the 16th century, it never would have been pronounced as a <b> at all. In a Greek class that I took in grad school, the prof explained how historical pronunciations are reconstructed from times that did not have sound recording. Guess how? The spelling errors! Ingenious, no? Spelling errors don't always, but usually tend to simplify spellings and to write words as they are spoken. Ten bucks says that the common Latin American misspellings surrounding v/b are entirely absent from before the 16th c.
Jun
23
answered A single word for someone who is not pleased no matter how hard you try
Jun
23
comment A single word for someone who is not pleased no matter how hard you try
Implacable is a perfectly intelligent word. And it has the benefit that "plac-" is the Latin root for "to please." It literally means, "unpleasable."
Jun
22
answered Is there a term to describe speech that has a hidden meaning but is not sarcastic?
Jun
22
answered Confusing meanings of “inexorable” and “unstoppable”
Jun
21
comment If Christopher is a “carrier of Christ” then what is Jennifer carrying?
Good ear! A reverse flow happens too. We commonly think of "Spain" Spanish as "older" than Latin American Spanish, and so on. When we look at the idea, we see it is absurd. Spain isn't older than Latin America, and its Spanish isn't either, even though it was spoken there first. LatAm Spanish branched from Castilian, and they both continue to develop alongside each other. The branching happened relatively late in their development and as reliable means of communication were becoming available. Things trendy in the New World spread home, and purists in the New World insist upon the older ways!
Jun
21
answered If Christopher is a “carrier of Christ” then what is Jennifer carrying?
Jun
20
answered Is the meaning of “This is it” figurative?
Jun
20
answered What are the origins of the idiom “dying to…”?
Jun
20
answered How to understand “like it or not”?
Jun
20
answered What's the difference between “should” and “could” (in the present tense)?
Jun
20
awarded  Supporter
Jun
6
answered use of contractions (and some homophones)
Jun
6
answered Usage of and equivalents of Sir
Jun
3
awarded  Teacher
Jun
3
answered Usage of and equivalents of Sir
Jun
3
awarded  Autobiographer