1,647 reputation
412
bio website ryanhaberphotography.com
location Bethesda, MD
age 37
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Nov 25 '13 at 19:36

I'm a technical writer at MicroStrategy in Vienna, VA.

I like running 5k, 8k, 10k, and marathons; watching movies; and reading philosophy or novels. My favorite activity, though, is hiking/backpacking/camping in wild areas and faraway lands ranging from Cambodia to my own backyard. And bringing my camera along is likely to make anything into pure joy.


Dec
5
answered “Sound engineering”
Nov
8
comment The correct syntax for “I/We remain” at the end of the letter
Any number of other affixes might work in place of "we remain" with a participial closing. I don't think it exactly weakens the letter - though it does that too, I suppose - but it clutters it. Business is very economical and a succinct closing is therefore more appropriate. In personal letters, there is more room to play around and have fun.
Nov
8
answered The correct syntax for “I/We remain” at the end of the letter
Oct
28
comment Capitalization of German words in English sentences
Matt is correct, according to Chicago (10.43 and 7.54).
Oct
28
answered Meaning of “move out of a walk”
Oct
20
comment If the prefix anglo- means “of the English”, what prefix means “of the Welsh”?
@Cerberus - Just so! I am sure you are right.
Oct
20
comment How popular is “sine qua non” in English? If I use it in day to day conversation, will I be scoffed at?
@jimbob - Just so! That's kind of what I was getting at with the last line of my last comment: it is courteous to address one's audience in terms it is likely to understand. I like the word "obfuscated" and, as a technical writer, sometimes look back over my own work and think, "Sheesh! Could I have obfuscated any worse!?" Lol.
Oct
14
answered If the prefix anglo- means “of the English”, what prefix means “of the Welsh”?
Oct
13
comment How popular is “sine qua non” in English? If I use it in day to day conversation, will I be scoffed at?
I do love Latin very much, and defend its use adamantly. That said, your point about the particular expression "sounding heavy and false" rings true with me. It is too lengthy and uncommon to be used in a genuinely casual way, as de facto might be used. Because it is easily substituted with one or more perfectly accurate English-language equivalents, it probably should be.
Oct
13
comment How popular is “sine qua non” in English? If I use it in day to day conversation, will I be scoffed at?
Actually, the Associated Press has a handbook, which I have on my desk at home, that - if I am not mistaken - gives a list of Latin phrases they believe to be current and therefore acceptable for newspaper publication. It would be interesting to see if sine qua non is on the list.
Oct
13
comment How popular is “sine qua non” in English? If I use it in day to day conversation, will I be scoffed at?
You are correct, Jimbob, in a general rule that Latin phrases with technical meanings should be used. An earlier comment gives a good general rule to avoid Latin phrases in company unlikely to understand them. To refrain from their use in such circumstances is a courteous thing to do.
Oct
13
comment How popular is “sine qua non” in English? If I use it in day to day conversation, will I be scoffed at?
Jimbob, your comment is correct, in my opinion, until the last paragraph. You use the word "obfuscation" and it makes a nice demonstration of your last paragraph. The word is not as widely known as perhaps it ought to be, but a child or even an adult not knowing the word hardly makes it pretentious - except from the perspective of the ignorant party, who might just as easily have some sort of inferiority complex about the whole thing.
Sep
29
comment What do you call a person who is easily replaced?
Yeah, it's not an exact synonym because you can of course dispense with a thing without replacing it; but it seems to have something of the connotation sought, so I thought I'd put it up.
Sep
22
awarded  Mortarboard
Sep
22
awarded  Good Answer
Sep
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
21
answered What do you call a person who is easily replaced?
Aug
19
answered Noun form of “analytic”
Aug
9
answered ”See/wonder if +(a negative)” vs. “See/wonder if + (a positive)”
Jul
14
comment Referring to past times with “hence”
@ColinFine et al., I have to disagree. A week since is perfectly standard English. At least here, on the East Coast of the US, I here it in practical if not frequent use. Ago is certainly preferred.