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seen Mar 24 at 7:55

Mar
24
comment “Fingerprinting” traits of a horse
Just a note chestnuts are yet different traits - "vestigal thumbs" - small lumps of dry tissue (resembling scabs a little) that may or may not appear near ankles of horses and take different shapes and sizes if they do.
Mar
20
comment Is English “genderless” or are inanimate nouns just neuter by default?
@BramVanroy: Primarily that most of them are. I'm really not going to argue neuter vs genderless. I've got into enough trouble with Social Justice Warriors over such issues, not going to risk more.
Mar
20
comment Is English “genderless” or are inanimate nouns just neuter by default?
just a note that while for most machines that's a semi-rare quirk, with ships it's pretty much regular as long as we talk about specific ships. (while talking of generic/family of ships, they are neuter; "a barge is an unpowered vessel, it needs a tugboat for propulsion", if you refer to any specific ship, even without knowing about its details, it will be frequently, if not usually referred as female; "we've got a blip on the radar; she's moving north, speed four knots.") You won't see this with e.g. train engines. ("the engine whistled, then she pulled the train out of the station.")
Mar
20
comment Universal Words?
@MattGutting: while roughly correct, the transliteration of chocolate took some liberties. The correct transliteration from aztec would be 'xocolatl'.
Mar
20
comment Is English “genderless” or are inanimate nouns just neuter by default?
@BramVanroy: Your assertion is correct - "in most cases". While many other languages distribute the genders between their nouns in roughly equal proportions, English keeps a very narrow range of generic names assigned non-neuter gender. Ships, for example are female even if unknown (but specific). "Ship ho! She's a frigate and she flies English colors!"
Mar
20
comment Is English “genderless” or are inanimate nouns just neuter by default?
also, referring to an animal of known gender is always by the correct gender. A horse is 'it', but Seglawi, the Prophet Muhammad's mare is a she and Bucephalus, the stallion of Alexander the Great is a he.
Mar
20
revised Punctuation of quoted sentence used as a subject of outer sentence
added 83 characters in body
Mar
20
asked Punctuation of quoted sentence used as a subject of outer sentence
Mar
12
comment “Fingerprinting” traits of a horse
Nice, but there are names for specific types of these swirls/whorls. And while your first link lists these, I'm not finding them particularly reliable, because "Swirlology/Whorlology" really seems like a pseudoscience, treating the patterns as indication of some inborn traits: "A swirl directly between the eyes is normal. High swirls usually goes with a more active mind;" "Double or triple swirls indicate multiple personalities."
Mar
12
comment “Fingerprinting” traits of a horse
@IanMacDonald: I believe cowlick would apply to the convergence point. There was something like 'balding' about divergence, and the remaining were whirls or whorls or something like that. But I might just as well be imagining things.
Mar
12
asked “Fingerprinting” traits of a horse
Mar
7
accepted person providing identity for illegal operations
Mar
7
comment person providing identity for illegal operations
@Josh61: "Słup" is only used in this context; the words for lookout are different (e.g. "czujka" - "sensor"). The definition for cat's paw involves unwilling or unwitting accomplice. In this case the accomplice is willing, and only wilfully ignorant of details (so that they would be unable to provide them to the authorities).
Mar
7
comment person providing identity for illegal operations
@IanMacDonald: It sounds right to me, but I really don't know whether that's the word used in such situations.
Mar
7
comment person providing identity for illegal operations
...also, after such an operation the money is still 'dirty' (the thief is unable to provide a reasonable, legal explanation of its origin), it's just in form of cash (difficult to track, easier to launder) and not account balance.
Mar
7
comment person providing identity for illegal operations
(also, at times the person is practically not physically involved in the crime - for example create a bank account and pass all credentials (including the debit card and the bank-provided means of identifying the owner) to the criminal - they don't have access to the account; the criminal performs all the operations themselves but using the 'purchased' account. That way they only violate the bank's regulations (of not providing credentials to any third party) but not any laws).
Mar
7
comment person providing identity for illegal operations
This is different in that a fence uses own funds to purchase goods or 'dirty money', and then sells/launders them on their own - usually very rich. In this case it's providing a service only; for example cashing out a bank account balance. It's the same criminal on both ends of the transaction and the person in question is usually penniless.
Mar
7
comment person providing identity for illegal operations
@Josh61: That person collaborates in the criminal act, but takes care only of completely legal parts of it; isn't involved in the criminal act itself, so usually the only charge may be 'aiding a criminal'. Their activity, on the other hand, requires a valid legal identity and allows tracking the crime to that identity. Also, the person doesn't know any details on the criminal act itself, only could get reasonable suspicion the (legal) wares/money they trade will be used/were obtained in illegal way.
Mar
7
comment person providing identity for illegal operations
@LittleEva: Not in my case - in my specific situation I need the specific word for that service; the person in question is lower-middle class, definitely not the 'refuse' level, but providing identity to a true criminal overlord.
Mar
7
comment person providing identity for illegal operations
The question is definitely not about identity theft. The person in question willingly sells own identity, or in other cases provides minor normally legal services which require identity.