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Nov
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Sep
26
comment What is a verb that means “is possible”?
The problem with 'insists' is that it's a valid English word with an entirely different meaning: persisting in opinion or request despite opposition. "I know there's a lot of work, but you're sick and I insist you stay home and cure yourself." or "he insists he was never there, despite six witnesses testifying to the contrary."
Sep
26
comment What is a verb that means “is possible”?
I mean, the opponent makes a wrong move in chess and your move that will lead to checkmate avails. Beforehand, it was not possible (as in not a legal move; you could still cheat e.g. switch the pieces when the opponent is distracted, but according to chess rules the move leading directly to checkmate was impossible.) Now it avails, and you'd be a fool not to make that move.
Sep
26
comment What is a verb that means “is possible”?
@Joe: uh... that's a little circular definition there. In the given variant it's near to "makes itself available and useful", and can be used in relation to an opportunity, a tactic, etc. Something that was impossible (as in "makes no sense to try because it's bound to fail") suddenly becomes possible ("taking it up may lead to victory"). I agree the scope is limited and you won't say "failure avails". But in some specific contexts (and for specific meanings of "possible") it works.
Sep
26
answered What's a better way to say, “I'm a TV whore”?
Sep
26
comment What is the verb for dividing something into regions?
When on subject of verbs for dividing into regions, you may look into a very specific one: Gerrymandering.
Sep
26
comment What is a verb that means “is possible”?
@GuidoJorg: I don't think a verb for generic, general "is possible" exists. Most verbs apply to things that exist, and only compound constructs go with ones that don't. Like, there's no inexists, only doesn't exist or is inexistent.
Sep
26
answered What is a verb that means “is possible”?
Sep
26
comment Is it grammatical to say “the batmen”?
Thing is, walkman is not a man. I'd think a box of action figures of the Superman could be called a box of Supermans, but an eugenics supporter's aim is to create supermen.
Sep
25
comment Would anybody please tell me what is the difference between object and goal?
Object/objective is more immediate, the direct result of your actions; goal is the desired, derived, more distant result. Objective of the mission is assassination of the leader of rebels, with the goal of ending the rebellion. The object of research is a vaccine, the goal is ending the epidemy.
Aug
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Jul
25
comment Is “Unless if” grammatically incorrect?
@JanusBahsJacquet: Absolutely don't take me as any kind of authority on that. English is my second language and this is the kind of errors I'm quite prone to make.
Jul
25
answered Is “Unless if” grammatically incorrect?
Jul
25
comment What is meant by “same difference”?
Note, "No difference" is a neat, semi-formal or formal expression. "Same difference" means the same thing, but has slang/country connotations; it's not something you'd find in a scientific paper - being a rather silly oxymoron it's rather shunned in "cultured society", unless you use it for humorous purpose.
Jul
25
answered A critical situation in which no trick works?
Jul
22
comment More emphatic term for “Expert”?
The slight difference in connotation between the two is that Guru tends to be also a wise teacher, while Ace may be a loner, not willing to share the gift.
Jul
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Jul
7
comment What is the difference between illegal and unlawful?
@anixx: The program has performed an unlawful operation? Nope. You may try to perform an illegal move in chess, unless your move is drawing a gun on your opponent. Punching below the waist line in boxing is illegal, not unlawful. Simply, 'illegal' can apply to arbitrary set of rules, while 'unlawful' applies to law.