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Apr
13
revised “Fingerprinting” traits of a horse
added 1 character in body
Mar
29
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
25
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
25
revised Can the protagonist be the antagonist?
edited body
Mar
21
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
1
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
22
comment Can something be “extremely mediocre”?
...also, "If this is the very definition of average to you, then I really don't want to see the bad ones."
Feb
18
accepted Hyphenation or blending
Feb
17
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
31
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
26
awarded  Famous Question
Nov
27
comment Is “fatty” a proper word to use?
Obese is definitely a medical term which signals health problems. The common, most neutral term is overweight.
Nov
24
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
17
comment A phrase for: an underhanded malicious act that appears to be done in good faith
(plus shortly after I accepted the answer I got at least three new ones in short order, that completely omitted the "plausible deniability" part of the requirement as described in the question body, so I changed the title to emphasize the desired focus - once I learned how to phrase it concisely!)
Nov
17
comment A phrase for: an underhanded malicious act that appears to be done in good faith
@ErikE: I'd still be glad for an answer that gives a common name for the term, and I wouldn't hesitate to move the accept tick mark if such one happened, but it seems, among the entries in the accepted answer it's not "plausibly deniable malice" which is what I was looking for, but rather "I don't think English has a set phrase with all the connotations you are looking for." An answer of "there is none such" can still be a valid answer.
Nov
17
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
17
revised A phrase for: an underhanded malicious act that appears to be done in good faith
Changing the title to focus on the deniability (new answers seem to ignore that part).
Nov
17
comment A phrase for: an underhanded malicious act that appears to be done in good faith
@Mari-LouA: the problem is in grouping, ostensibly (innocent malignance) is a paradox, but (ostensibly innocent) malignance isn't. That's why I prefer plausibly deniable malice - because here the wrong grouping plausibly (deniable malice) carries about the same meaning as (plausibly deniable) malice.
Nov
17
awarded  Nice Question