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Jul
23
comment “There Is”/“There are” depends on plurality of the first list element or not?
@Araucaria: Why, it does. The answer depends on the formality of the text: in formal/academic texts the plurality must follow the strict grammaticality, meaning plural regardless of the first element ("there are an apple and some grapes"). In informal contexts (common speech, storytelling) singular is permissible, especially with a contraction ("there's an apple and some grapes").
Jul
8
comment “Czar” vs “tsar” - origins and pronunciation
@phoog: Cicero?
Jul
8
comment “Czar” vs “tsar” - origins and pronunciation
@phoog: Latin has some very consistent rules as to when 'c' is pronounced as 'k' and when as 'ts' and while the rule seems to be really narrow ('c' followed by any of 'y','i','e') the number of words where it's applicable seems to nearly outweigh the number of words where it isn't.
Jun
14
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
3
awarded  Yearling
May
28
awarded  Popular Question
May
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
25
comment Does “reinventing the wheel” have negative or positive connotation?
@Pacerier: It's called "tongue-in-cheek". The reversal makes it memorable for its vicious cynicism. It's the kind of reversal like instead of "never pour water into acid" you get "if you would rather have a shapeless blob instead of your face, pour water into acid."
Apr
16
awarded  Good Question
Apr
12
comment Sabotaging through purposeful procrastination
I think the fundamental difference between dilly-dalling and procrastination is that the latter is usually subconscious - you honestly want the work done but you can't overcome your inner resistance. You can dilly-dally consciously avoiding work, but it's not working that is the primary goal, not some covert goal resulting from not having the work done.
Apr
4
awarded  Pundit
Apr
4
accepted Dialogue tags with a mute speaker
Apr
4
comment Dialogue tags with a mute speaker
@Nick2253: Then a different example: "Yes!" she cheered vs "Yes!" She clapped her hands. It really doesn't denote the sequence of events, it's just that the whole quoted sentence is used as if it was a phrase/word of the tag phrase (or - respectively - not.)
Apr
3
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
3
comment Dialogue tags with a mute speaker
@FumbleFingers: Yes, especially that the character doesn't use sign language in my story, and the substitute methods are wildly varied and sometimes quite cumbersome, affecting flow of the the communication a lot.
Apr
3
comment Dialogue tags with a mute speaker
@Nick2253: There's a significant punctuation difference. You end the quote with a comma, followed with lowercase for dialogue tags. You end with a full stop and follow with capital letter for actions. "Yes," he said with a snicker. and "Yes." He snickered.
Apr
3
asked Dialogue tags with a mute speaker
Apr
3
comment Sabotaging through purposeful procrastination
It's similar, but very overt - no believable pretense of "excusable procrastination"; merely one by the book - taking time allowed by regulations but definitely exceeding time allowed by common sense.
Apr
3
comment Sabotaging through purposeful procrastination
Like lazy behavior for laziness' sake,..
Apr
2
comment Sabotaging through purposeful procrastination
Procrastination is not inactivity either; it's just performing substitute, unrelated or unhelpful activities. In this case it's avoidance of the right action, by doing something else to look like you're trying, while not trying for real.