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Jan
31
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
26
awarded  Famous Question
Nov
27
comment Is “fatty” a proper word to use?
Obese is definitely a medical term which signals health problems. The common, most neutral term is overweight.
Nov
24
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
17
comment A phrase for: an underhanded malicious act that appears to be done in good faith
(plus shortly after I accepted the answer I got at least three new ones in short order, that completely omitted the "plausible deniability" part of the requirement as described in the question body, so I changed the title to emphasize the desired focus - once I learned how to phrase it concisely!)
Nov
17
comment A phrase for: an underhanded malicious act that appears to be done in good faith
@ErikE: I'd still be glad for an answer that gives a common name for the term, and I wouldn't hesitate to move the accept tick mark if such one happened, but it seems, among the entries in the accepted answer it's not "plausibly deniable malice" which is what I was looking for, but rather "I don't think English has a set phrase with all the connotations you are looking for." An answer of "there is none such" can still be a valid answer.
Nov
17
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
17
revised A phrase for: an underhanded malicious act that appears to be done in good faith
Changing the title to focus on the deniability (new answers seem to ignore that part).
Nov
17
comment A phrase for: an underhanded malicious act that appears to be done in good faith
@Mari-LouA: the problem is in grouping, ostensibly (innocent malignance) is a paradox, but (ostensibly innocent) malignance isn't. That's why I prefer plausibly deniable malice - because here the wrong grouping plausibly (deniable malice) carries about the same meaning as (plausibly deniable) malice.
Nov
17
awarded  Nice Question
Nov
16
comment A phrase for: an underhanded malicious act that appears to be done in good faith
I guess that you are right that English has no such common phrase - and I believe an act of plausibly deniable malice is the most accurate description of the activity.
Nov
16
accepted A phrase for: an underhanded malicious act that appears to be done in good faith
Nov
16
comment A phrase for: an underhanded malicious act that appears to be done in good faith
@JoeBlow: Look at the extra example in the comment right above yours. From a scientific point of view this is a clear course of actions; scientists performing a research and publishing it which is the most natural course of action. This gets less clear if you look at it from a political point of view: this kind of research is usually kept secret by the military, Releasing it to the public hurts a rival country economically. USA can't really complain because that's what scientists are supposed to do, but the fact it was allowed to go public creates an unprovable suspicion of foul play.
Nov
16
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
16
comment A phrase for: an underhanded malicious act that appears to be done in good faith
@DoktorJ: I wonder if this would be applicable to bigger entities. I'm asking this in regards to a recent article: Chinese researchers published paper on a stealth material. They made it accessible to broad public; seems any country can now develop a plane invisible to standard radars. Among different motivations behind this move one discussed is that it's an inexpensive way to force the USA to run into costs of upgrading their radars to detect the new stealth planes - which don't exist yet (and won't, with the radars upgraded).
Nov
16
comment A phrase for: an underhanded malicious act that appears to be done in good faith
The "queer the pitch" seems closest to the intended meaning.
Nov
16
comment A phrase for: an underhanded malicious act that appears to be done in good faith
@JoeBlow: Report a violation, like a good citizen (but at unfortunate time)? Provide a kind advice to a random person? Use the liberty to choose any time for your holidays you like, with the company's "first come first served rule", at unfortunate time again? Follow an order and, being a subordinate, never question the competence of your superior? The malicious intent is not provable.
Nov
16
comment A phrase for: an underhanded malicious act that appears to be done in good faith
It misses the "innocent means" part though - while the spiteful action is traceable to the source, there is no way to place a blame or prove this was done out of spite.
Nov
16
asked A phrase for: an underhanded malicious act that appears to be done in good faith