797 reputation
48
bio website Donthaveone
location Denmark
age 41
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Sep 15 '13 at 10:49

Intelligent, often irreverent and irrepressible.

The I's have it.


Sep
26
comment Is there a word for having more than ten fingers?
Just as a sidenote: polydactyly is often a dominant trait, and will be seen often in families.
Sep
12
comment Word for someone who collects dice
@Manu Are they 'open' dice or 'closed' dice? :p
Sep
11
comment “Dear Professor” vs “Dear Mr”: differences between British and American usage
@Fumbefingers Do you also complain about the cultural changes made to Harry Potter to suit the Japanese culture/reader? They did far more 'catering' to that market than simple Mr./Professor alteration.
Sep
11
comment Etymology of “binky” — three questions
Interesting; I've never heard of a 'binky' referring to a hop - it's always been a pet name for a pacifier for an infant when I've heard it used.
Sep
6
comment “Dear Professor” vs “Dear Mr”: differences between British and American usage
As I said; it reflects the cultural norm of how to address a professor in the US. The Harry Potter series is a work of fiction that's been 'translated' worldwide. As such, it's been altered slightly to 'fit in' to the culture it's being targeted to. For the US, the titles of characters. For France/Germany - use of the different 'you' pronouns. In Japanese, the characters were portrayed as 'stereotypically feminine' by the translators - something they are most definitely NOT in the original English.
Aug
24
comment What is the origin of the phrase, “Gag me with a spoon”?
...if there's any snippets of "Square Pegs" on youtube, they'd make a wonderful (?) example of Valley Girl speak. Like, totally!
Aug
21
comment Chicks - Girls, Cats - Boys?
Yes, you can call a female jazz enthusiast a cool cat. I've played in jazz ensembles and the 'old school' guys refer to EVERYONE as a 'cat'.
Aug
19
comment Why is a story not called a “-logue”, though it has a prologue and an epilogue?
A story has a dialogue; the written/spoken exchange between characters.
Aug
19
comment Why father is called “dada” and not “fafa”
As a sidenote, father is from the old Norse faðir (where the ð (Eth/Edd) has the 'th' sound). The Eth has been dropped from use in the alphabets of Danish, Norwegian and Swedish, but is still found in Faroese and Icelandic. However, kids do call their fathers 'fafa' in Denmark, or just 'far'[fah] (Far is the Danish word for Father).
Jul
24
comment Does “manicure” only apply to caring for hands?
@GEdgar There's still a 'hand' behind the machine. The use of sheep would not give the same 'polished' appearance to which the term 'manicured' could be applied.
Jul
18
comment Mow the lawn, cut the grass, mow the yard, cut the yard …what is correct?
I have to admit, I've used the phrase, "Cut the yard" as well as the others.
Jul
15
comment Which is correct: “soda” or “pop”?
I've always called it a soda (being from Connecticut) unless I was up in New Hampshire visiting my grandparents; then it was called a 'tonic'.
Jul
8
comment Meaning of a quote in movie Casino Royale (2006)
@Udayan the term is 'latter' not 'later'. It means the second of two mentioned 'things' - in this case a dinner jacket. 'Former' refers to the first dinner jacket. As far as 'there are dinner jackets, and then there are dinner jackets' - it's comparing the quality of the item. One could also say, 'There are cars, and then there are cars.' One could be a Yugo, the other a Ferrari - normally speaking the Ferrari is of much higher quality and LOOKS nicer. They're both cars, to be sure - but which one would you rather be seen in?
Jul
4
comment What do you call someone who chooses to stay single for life?
@UpTheCreek a confirmed bachelor is someone who chooses to remain single - it doesn't mean they don't have relationships (see George Clooney), however they don't marry. Unfortunately, as has been noted, there are no comparable words for single women which aren't derogatory - 'confirmed bachelorette' hasn't quite yet caught on.
Jun
30
comment Occupation vs. Job vs. Employment vs. Profession
@Pavium yes, yes it is.
Jun
21
comment American pronunciation of “professor” and “law”
I'm also a cot/caught person, but I don't see a 'pout' between law and school when I say them?
Jun
18
comment Is there a rule in British English about how to pronounce “either”?
I'll use either pronunciation - it depends on the context of the sentence.
Jun
18
comment Is there a difference between the pronunciation of a teenager, and the pronunciation of an adult?
It also depends on whether or not the teenager is local to the area; many people take weekends on Long Island - and a NYC accent is different from a Jersey accent, and so forth.
Jun
9
comment What is it called phonetically, when Americans change the pronunciation of “pronunciation” to “pro-*noun*-ciation”?
I've noticed something similar with Danish speakers. The word for vikings is vikinger, which is pronounced with a VEE sound, yet when they go to pronounce 'vikings' in English it becomes (more often than not) WHYkings.
Jun
9
comment Is it appropriate to call a British person a “Brit”?
@Malvolio as a New Englander, to me a Yankee doesn't mean someone from Maine, it's just another word for a New Englander. People from Maine are known as Maniacs.