817 reputation
58
bio website Donthaveone
location Denmark
age 41
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Sep 15 '13 at 10:49

Intelligent, often irreverent and irrepressible.

The I's have it.


Jun
5
comment Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors - what category?
@Marcin With regards to (a) the use is widespread, the origin is American: phrases.org.uk/meanings/if-it-aint-broke-dont-fix-it.html (c) Your analogy is flawed. The use of sophister was not limited to a single university, both Cambridge AND Oxford utilized it for a period of time. A swift examination of online dictionaries lists sophister as follows: (Eng. Univ.) A student who is advanced beyond the first year of his residence. [1913 Webster] The universities anglicised the word 'sophisms' when they called their students sophisters (users of sophisms)
Jun
5
awarded  Supporter
Jun
5
comment Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors - what category?
They are English peculiarities. They are Greek in origin (as many English words are), however their usage in that manner (the description of academic levels) is most definitely English. The same could be said about the Imperial Units still in use in the US: it was brought over from England and it's still in use. To use a Southern vernacular, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it."
Jun
5
comment Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors - what category?
@Marcin if you read my comment closely I said they came OVER from England, not that they were 'English' in origin (they are quite obviously Greek). These designations were also used at Oxford for a short time. They were 'imported' to the US during said time and have evolved somewhat since then, but their ancestry is indisputably from use by English academia.
Jun
5
comment Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors - what category?
@Marcin: The use of freshman, etc came directly over from England in the mid 1700's. straightdope.com/columns/read/1982/… sigh, someday I'll remember to hit shift + enter when typing a comment here, but apparently not today They're one of those 'English peculiarities' that we've kept. For high school students, however, they're still commonly referred to as '9th graders, 10th graders, etc' and not just 'freshmen, etc'.
Jun
4
comment In baseball, is it proper to pluralize “RBI”?
You could also say he had one RBI, or three RBIs. I've heard it pronounced the 'long way' R B I, or short 'n sweet: ribi/ribis
Jun
2
awarded  Autobiographer