817 reputation
58
bio website Donthaveone
location Denmark
age 41
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Sep 15 '13 at 10:49

Intelligent, often irreverent and irrepressible.

The I's have it.


Jun
11
answered What word describes interpreting evidence in such a way as to reach a desired conclusion?
Jun
9
comment What is it called phonetically, when Americans change the pronunciation of “pronunciation” to “pro-*noun*-ciation”?
I've noticed something similar with Danish speakers. The word for vikings is vikinger, which is pronounced with a VEE sound, yet when they go to pronounce 'vikings' in English it becomes (more often than not) WHYkings.
Jun
9
comment Is it appropriate to call a British person a “Brit”?
@Malvolio as a New Englander, to me a Yankee doesn't mean someone from Maine, it's just another word for a New Englander. People from Maine are known as Maniacs.
Jun
9
answered Is there an English word meaning “snacks eaten as an accompaniment while drinking alcohol”?
Jun
9
comment Grandma and Nan, origins and differences?
In my family it was Grammy and Grampy for the grandparents (Gram & Gramp for short), and the great-grandparents (well, one of them) was either Greatfather or Pepe. I never knew my great-grandmother, but my brother called her Meme or Greatmother.
Jun
9
answered What are the polite and neutral versions of “cut the bull*’?
Jun
7
answered Can I use the term 'America' to signify just the United States?
Jun
6
comment Why are there two pronunciations for “either”?
You can add neither to the list as well. I've heard it both ways as well. I grew up saying it as /nī-thər/, fwiw.
Jun
6
comment Are there any “-nk-” or “-nc-” words in English where there isn't a “ng” before the “k” sound?
I pronounce N-chlorosuccinimide with a definite EN and not ing
Jun
6
comment “In Long Island” or “on Long Island”?
@Kosmonaut but it usually sounds like, "I live awn Lawn Guyland".
Jun
6
comment Are there any “-nk-” or “-nc-” words in English where there isn't a “ng” before the “k” sound?
I don't have a 'ng' sound for any of these words either.
Jun
6
awarded  Commentator
Jun
6
comment Is there a word for a person who gives out too many extraneous details?
Prattling git works too.
Jun
5
comment Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors - what category?
@Marcin Why do some people in England still use the 'stone' as a measure of their weight? Preference? Tradition?
Jun
5
awarded  Teacher
Jun
5
answered What does “off the strip” mean (Las Vegas)?
Jun
5
answered What is the difference between “horrify” and “terrify”?
Jun
5
comment Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors - what category?
@Jon Copenhagen University has done the same for two of its campuses; they have 'new' maps and 'old' maps - so it's always a crapshoot whether or not you have the right building - some were given new names, some they just changed the number. @Marcin Webster is a perfectly acceptable dictionary for reasonable individuals. Encyclopedia.co.uk cites it for the definition of sophister, and further down on their page, the listing for sophomore says, "The word was probably introduced into the United States at an early date, from the University of Cambridge, England."
Jun
5
comment Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors - what category?
@Marcin Of course, I was waiting for the inevitable "but that's Webster, what did he know?" reply. The Collins Dictionary lists it as, "1. (esp formerly) a second-year undergraduate at certain British universities", Dictionary.com with, "Chiefly British . (especially formerly) a second or third year student at a university." and a side note that the word origin is 1350-1400 Middle English.
Jun
5
comment How do American dialects differ?
New England accents often get lumped into a generic "Boston" (ahem. BAWSTIN) accent, when there are actually MANY. I grew up in CT, and can hear the difference between Providence, Boston, NYC, Vermont, and Seacoast NH/Downeast Maine.