817 reputation
58
bio website Donthaveone
location Denmark
age 41
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Sep 15 '13 at 10:49

Intelligent, often irreverent and irrepressible.

The I's have it.


Jul
23
answered Does “manicure” only apply to caring for hands?
Jul
21
awarded  Editor
Jul
21
revised Do Americans understand Donald Duck?
added 599 characters in body
Jul
18
comment Mow the lawn, cut the grass, mow the yard, cut the yard …what is correct?
I have to admit, I've used the phrase, "Cut the yard" as well as the others.
Jul
17
answered Do Americans understand Donald Duck?
Jul
15
comment Which is correct: “soda” or “pop”?
I've always called it a soda (being from Connecticut) unless I was up in New Hampshire visiting my grandparents; then it was called a 'tonic'.
Jul
8
comment Meaning of a quote in movie Casino Royale (2006)
@Udayan the term is 'latter' not 'later'. It means the second of two mentioned 'things' - in this case a dinner jacket. 'Former' refers to the first dinner jacket. As far as 'there are dinner jackets, and then there are dinner jackets' - it's comparing the quality of the item. One could also say, 'There are cars, and then there are cars.' One could be a Yugo, the other a Ferrari - normally speaking the Ferrari is of much higher quality and LOOKS nicer. They're both cars, to be sure - but which one would you rather be seen in?
Jul
4
comment What do you call someone who chooses to stay single for life?
@UpTheCreek a confirmed bachelor is someone who chooses to remain single - it doesn't mean they don't have relationships (see George Clooney), however they don't marry. Unfortunately, as has been noted, there are no comparable words for single women which aren't derogatory - 'confirmed bachelorette' hasn't quite yet caught on.
Jun
30
comment Occupation vs. Job vs. Employment vs. Profession
@Pavium yes, yes it is.
Jun
30
answered Occupation vs. Job vs. Employment vs. Profession
Jun
21
comment American pronunciation of “professor” and “law”
I'm also a cot/caught person, but I don't see a 'pout' between law and school when I say them?
Jun
19
answered Should I put a definite article before a scientific term?
Jun
19
answered Meaning of “hail from”
Jun
18
answered How many of the “Top 10 favorite British words” are understood by Americans?
Jun
18
comment Is there a rule in British English about how to pronounce “either”?
I'll use either pronunciation - it depends on the context of the sentence.
Jun
18
comment Is there a difference between the pronunciation of a teenager, and the pronunciation of an adult?
It also depends on whether or not the teenager is local to the area; many people take weekends on Long Island - and a NYC accent is different from a Jersey accent, and so forth.
Jun
18
answered Are “betwixt”, “trebble”, etc., acceptable in American English?
Jun
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
13
answered “someone nodded abstractly”
Jun
13
answered In the sentence “Each time you sleep with someone, you also sleep with his past,” what does “past” mean?