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Jun
2
awarded  Yearling
Jun
2
awarded  Yearling
Sep
14
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
2
awarded  Yearling
Jun
2
awarded  Yearling
Apr
24
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
19
answered Does “I’m available” mean “I’m single”?
Sep
26
comment Is there a word for having more than ten fingers?
Just as a sidenote: polydactyly is often a dominant trait, and will be seen often in families.
Sep
12
comment Word for someone who collects dice
@Manu Are they 'open' dice or 'closed' dice? :p
Sep
11
comment “Dear Professor” vs “Dear Mr”: differences between British and American usage
@Fumbefingers Do you also complain about the cultural changes made to Harry Potter to suit the Japanese culture/reader? They did far more 'catering' to that market than simple Mr./Professor alteration.
Sep
11
comment Etymology of “binky” — three questions
Interesting; I've never heard of a 'binky' referring to a hop - it's always been a pet name for a pacifier for an infant when I've heard it used.
Sep
6
comment “Dear Professor” vs “Dear Mr”: differences between British and American usage
As I said; it reflects the cultural norm of how to address a professor in the US. The Harry Potter series is a work of fiction that's been 'translated' worldwide. As such, it's been altered slightly to 'fit in' to the culture it's being targeted to. For the US, the titles of characters. For France/Germany - use of the different 'you' pronouns. In Japanese, the characters were portrayed as 'stereotypically feminine' by the translators - something they are most definitely NOT in the original English.
Sep
5
answered “Dear Professor” vs “Dear Mr”: differences between British and American usage
Aug
24
comment What is the origin of the phrase “Gag me with a spoon”?
...if there's any snippets of "Square Pegs" on youtube, they'd make a wonderful (?) example of Valley Girl speak. Like, totally!
Aug
21
comment Chicks - Girls, Cats - Boys?
Yes, you can call a female jazz enthusiast a cool cat. I've played in jazz ensembles and the 'old school' guys refer to EVERYONE as a 'cat'.
Aug
19
comment Why is a story not called a “-logue”, though it has a prologue and an epilogue?
A story has a dialogue; the written/spoken exchange between characters.
Aug
19
comment Why father is called “dada” and not “fafa”
As a sidenote, father is from the old Norse faðir (where the ð (Eth/Edd) has the 'th' sound). The Eth has been dropped from use in the alphabets of Danish, Norwegian and Swedish, but is still found in Faroese and Icelandic. However, kids do call their fathers 'fafa' in Denmark, or just 'far'[fah] (Far is the Danish word for Father).
Aug
15
answered Is there an American English equivalent of the British idiom “carrying coals to Newcastle”?