Reputation
5,942
Next privilege 10,000 Rep.
Access moderator tools
Badges
2 9 23
Newest
 Civic Duty
Impact
~796k people reached

1d
comment “how quicker” vs. “how much quicker”
How sharper than a serpent's tooth... ---W. Shakespeare
2d
comment What does ramiculated mean?
Probably a technical jargon of the field.
2d
comment It's too cute! But what is “it”?
Maybe "it" is the cat. But maybe "it" is the same as the star of such sentences as "It's snowing" or "It's Wednesday".
Apr
14
comment Is 'bug' a term or a slang word?
Certainly debug is in official documents.
Apr
14
comment Dragons are “fantastic” creatures or “fantastical” creatures?
See also: english.stackexchange.com/questions/171509/… ; english.stackexchange.com/questions/65891/… ; english.stackexchange.com/questions/6581/…
Apr
13
comment Antonym for “endorsement”?
In certain contexts, the opposite or endo- is exo- ... So if you want to invent your word, try that.
Apr
13
comment “That strikes one for me”…what's it mean?
Merely a guess about the original quote.
Apr
13
comment Meaning of “broken” in a phrase “broken hallelujah”
"2nd stanza" may be misleading, since there are different versions of the song that have been recorded. In fact, there is a whole book written about this one song... Alan Light, The holy or the broken :Leonard Cohen, Jeff Buckley, and the unlikely ascent of "Hallelujah"
Apr
12
comment Is it “anybody have plans” or “anybody has plans”?
I think my analysis is incorrect. With "Does" in there, even the first one is third person. (And "have" is infinitive with do-support.)
Apr
11
comment What is a phrase for movie theaters that show few-month-old movies at discount rates?
Second-run theatres. We used to call them "dollar theatres", but that was back when the ticket prices were lower.
Apr
11
comment Is there any word for the opposite of a “bug” in programming?
Still a bug. A beneficial bug, perhaps, but a bug.
Apr
11
answered Is it “anybody have plans” or “anybody has plans”?
Apr
11
comment One word for the act of being born?
So, grammatically, "being born" is not something you do, it is something that happens to you.
Apr
10
comment Use of the pronoun “it”
You need a subject it in the second clause. So 2 and 3 are wrong. You can include "then" or not, both are correct. Definitely include "then" if the first clause is long and complicated. But that is for readability, not for grammar.
Apr
8
comment It seems natural to say “who'd've” in speech, but is this incorrect?
It is fine... And please do not spell it "who'd of"!
Apr
6
comment Pronunciation and rules of English grammar
Is there some authority that decides grammar in your language? What is the punishment for those who use "unapproved" expressions?
Apr
5
comment A question on 'full' Vs 'fully', both as 'adverbs'
I guess "full angry" sounds classical, like Shakespeare or something.
Apr
4
comment Meaning of new sub-entry added to the Oxford English Dictionary: “to have off”
Or "She has next week off". This does exist in the US.
Apr
3
comment Is “He is risen” Correct?
And english.stackexchange.com/questions/4080/…
Apr
3
comment Is “He is risen” Correct?
Also see english.stackexchange.com/a/71012/9368