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7h
comment 'Wasn't dressed' vs 'Didn't dress'
for the performance.
7h
comment Reflexive pronoun of someone
The traditional pronoun is "his". But you may be accused of sexism if you try that today.
7h
revised Reflexive pronoun of someone
spelling corrected in title
2d
comment Are “a” and “the” adjectives?
Back in school I learned that articles are adjectives.
Feb
1
comment class vs. group
"Class" and "Group" are used as technical terms in some arcane areas of learning, such as computer science. That doesn't mean the definitions you quote here are "wrong".
Jan
30
comment How can we distinguish between “I would” and “I had” if someone says “I'd”?
What are verbs where infinitive and past participle are the same? Vijin tried "read", but infinitive and past participle are pronounced differently, so this is ambiguous only when written.
Jan
30
comment What's in native speakers' mind when they use different verb forms?
I'm sure native English speakers who learn Cantonese would also have their jaws drop when they listen to you talk normally.
Jan
28
comment “Carbine” rifle | is there pronunciation demographic data?
OED has this ... Brit. /ˈkɑːbʌɪn/ , U.S. /ˈkɑrˌbaɪn/ , /kɑrbin/
Jan
28
answered “road” vs. “pavement” vs. “roadway” for French “chaussée” [road surface] in AmEng vernacular
Jan
28
comment “road” vs. “pavement” vs. “roadway” for French “chaussée” [road surface] in AmEng vernacular
Where I live, "pavement" is paved with macadam... so if a sidewalk is concrete or stone or dirt, it would not be called "pavement". My dictionary says "pavement" meaning "sidewalk" is a British meaning.
Jan
25
comment Is there a term for a free ride without consent?
freeloading....
Jan
24
comment Correct use of the pronoun “one”?
This usage of "one" is gradually disappearing in the US. More common would be "If you fail, then you must simply try harder." Even when "you" means "one".
Jan
24
comment Better synonym for “retirement”
"out to pasture" ... "withering away" ...
Jan
23
comment What verbs can you use in a sentence “The movie ”Boyhood“ runs for three hours”?
Boyhood drags on for three hours. Boyhood zips by in three hours.
Jan
23
comment “Down by a point” meaning
Ricky should be banned from attempting humor.
Jan
23
comment “Down by a point” meaning
@marsce ... yes, those are different.
Jan
23
comment What do we call an adjective made of a verb?
In English class I learned that gerund only applies to -ing words, not those in this question.
Jan
22
comment Someone is a … user of a something, to say he is using it daily or a lot?
A constant user. A regular user.
Jan
21
comment Is it correct to use “most” + “-est” together?
Do this only if you are silently referring to Shakespeare's "most unkindest cut".
Jan
21
comment Difference between “He does work” and “He works”
The third one to consider (when you ask this again at ELL): "He is working".