861 reputation
717
bio website stackoverflow.com/users/…
location Earth
age 33
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Nov 25 at 2:42

South Asianist, polyglot, amateur programmer, urban farming entrepreneur, development analyst, philosopher, control freak, coffee addict, etc. etc.


Nov
24
asked What is the name of the base form of and adjective?
Nov
5
accepted What's a better word for “vegetable food products”
Nov
5
comment What's a better word for “vegetable food products”
I specifically mean fresh agriculture.
Nov
4
comment What's a better word for “vegetable food products”
I like this answer. I didn't know produce had a meaning specific to agriculture.
Nov
4
comment What's a better word for “vegetable food products”
Could you please stop trying to delete this post and help me solve my question by improving it? This conservatism is really not helpful.
Nov
4
revised What's a better word for “vegetable food products”
Added precision on the meaning of "vegetable"
Nov
4
comment What's a better word for “vegetable food products”
Are you trying to bring an answer here? Why are you getting so intense? There are many definitions of vegetable, here, as already stated above, I mean vegetable in a broad sense: i.e. as opposed to mineral or animal. So that would include fruits and fungus and non-artificially processed vegetable products such as honey.
Nov
4
comment What's a better word for “vegetable food products”
Exactly. Here I'm talking about agricultural products. Honey is not excluded, although it wouldn't be the top of my list. Here I mean vegetable as opposed to mineral or animal.
Nov
4
asked What's a better word for “vegetable food products”
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
27
awarded  Yearling
Mar
22
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
25
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
19
accepted Meaning: to back into
Jan
19
asked Meaning: to back into
Jan
6
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
22
awarded  Popular Question
May
27
awarded  Yearling
Apr
3
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
24
comment In IPA, what is the difference between ə and ʌ?
The rule about the unstressed [ʌ] versus stressed [ə] does not always hold true. For instance "unfair" [ʌnˈfɛər]. But I would agree that the difference between the two sounds really is insignificant.