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revised Using archaic (obsolete) words for decimal penny
added 7 characters in body; edited tags
Jun
26
answered Verb meaning “giving people sh*t”
Jun
15
comment Does “Magna Carta” require an article?
Also, if we were to stick to Latin grammar rules here, I believe the ending on "Carta" would have to change depending on what part of a sentence it is being used in. I got D's in Latin though, so don't hold me to that...
Jun
15
comment Does “Magna Carta” require an article?
Not downvoting, but the first sentence is a line of argument with a long and rather ignominious pedigree. For instance the old "don't split an infinitive" (mis)rule supposedly came from scholars of Latin, where such a thing was not possible. The problem is that Latin and English are indisputably different languages, and we are talking about English here. It is quite proper to impose English grammar rules upon terms imported into it once they have been used in English for a while. 800 years seems long enough to me.
Jun
15
comment Does “Magna Carta” require an article?
(otherwise, this is essentially making the same point as my answer, so +1 from me. :-) )
Jun
15
comment Does “Magna Carta” require an article?
I'd suggest taking the chat link in the comments of my answer and reading it over. @eliyahu-g Has indeed found tons of examples from US-based publications of an article-less Magna Carta. There's even one intriguing example where someone at CNN seems to have missed an edit and left one occurrence of the article in. I regretfully have to agree with him that this looks like a concerted effort.
Jun
15
comment Does “Magna Carta” require an article?
Let us continue this discussion in chat.
Jun
15
revised Does “Magna Carta” require an article?
deleted 77 characters in body
Jun
15
comment Does “Magna Carta” require an article?
I think you all are right about the "University" thing. We say it different, but not at all in the simple way I'm implying. Removing it.
Jun
15
revised Does “Magna Carta” require an article?
deleted 2 characters in body
Jun
15
comment Does “Magna Carta” require an article?
@eliyahu-g - I'm sorry, but that usage just looks wrong to me. I looked up the author of that NYT piece, and it is a professor of International Studies, who has spent a large part of his CV outside of the US. Which dialect of English is his native one (if any) I could not tell you.
Jun
15
comment Does “Magna Carta” require an article?
As someone who on occasion designs (computer) languages, I actually have a lot of admiration for the Brit's attempts to do away with the indefinite article. Its a nigh-useless bit of syntactic sugar.
Jun
15
answered Does “Magna Carta” require an article?
Jun
4
comment A word for a single piece of type of information, equivalent to a field on a form
It isn't that data is "used as a singular word", as much as it is used as a mass noun. Wikipedia covers this
Jun
2
awarded  Popular Question
May
29
comment Is the word “palaver” in common use anywhere in the English-speaking world?
@lserni - That wouldn't shock me in the slightest. Eric appears to be a huge fan of "Golden Age" Scifi, and has even gotten some of it republished.
May
29
comment Is the word “palaver” in common use anywhere in the English-speaking world?
If its at the pointer, that looks like Philly or its suburbs. I lived there for 5 years in the '90's. In my experience, that's one of those areas of the US that feels it has no accent, but I can pick out and locate easily. :-)
May
29
answered Is the word “palaver” in common use anywhere in the English-speaking world?
May
27
awarded  Yearling
May
26
revised Active or passive voice - which to use?
added 497 characters in body