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location Tulsa, OK
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visits member for 2 years, 10 months
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2d
comment Why use “modestly” to describe Moller in this paragraph?
IMHO the use of "enormity" in what I'll describe generously as a "new modern meaning" ("large size", rather than the traditional "really bad") is generally a marker of someone who's trying to sound much more erudite than they really are. So I wouldn't worry too much about yourself if you missed the meaning of things a bit in that statement. The author did too. :-)
Apr
11
comment My English translator capitalizes every noun. Is it correct?
@MrLister - I think that's just a coincidence of where you are looking. Check the "Safety" submenu. There you will find things like "ActiveX Filtering" alongside "Delete browsing history...". You could try to claim that the "Filtering" is part of a proper name for a feature, but you're really stretching things there. Occam's Razor (the simplest explanation) says its essentially random.
Apr
11
comment My English translator capitalizes every noun. Is it correct?
@AlexisBeingessner On my current version of IE, it seems kind of random (my personal favorite is "Add site to Start menu"). However, my other Microsoft apps do seem to be fairly consistent (eg: "New Items" and "Reply All")
Apr
11
comment My English translator capitalizes every noun. Is it correct?
I have to say, as a longtime computer user (and lifelong English user), I'm used to all menu selections being capitalized this way. For instance, I can pull down the Firefox menu on this browser, and every single item has every word capitalized.
Apr
9
comment What is the meaning of “You are only coming through in waves”
...whereas I give a +1, because its an awesome song.
Mar
30
comment “Bald Faced Lie” vs. “Bold Faced Lie”
Note that in a lot of English-speaking places, "bald" and "bold" are pronounced similarly (Southern American Midland comes to mind). For expressions that are commonly heard but not commonly read, its not unusual for some folks to learn to use the expression without actually knowing which words they are using.
Mar
19
comment What is a word that means “a person or thing which is small yet capable of defeating big giants”?
Or "X-killer" where X is something known to dominate its niche. For instance, lots of new cellphones are marketed as an "iPhone-killer". Lots of new games competing with World of Warcraft are referred to as a "WoW-killer".
Mar
19
comment the pronunciation of “get”
Actually, my money would be on somewhere that uses "/gɪt/", as "throw a fit" seems like it would be a much more familiar concept to a pre-schooler than "get upset".
Mar
19
revised the pronunciation of “get”
added 17 characters in body
Mar
19
comment the pronunciation of “get”
@PeterShor - Interesting. Perhaps here it was changed to rhyme better with our accent (or visa-versa, depending on where it was coined).
Mar
19
comment Should the word Boolean be capitalized?
"int" and "bool" are C/C++ keywords. That language family is case-sensitive, so capitalizing either would be incorrect.
Mar
19
revised capitals or not for “open source”?
deleted 18 characters in body
Mar
19
revised capitals or not for “open source”?
added 132 characters in body
Mar
19
answered capitals or not for “open source”?
Mar
14
comment How do you politely ask for someone's gender?
@EricWilson - ...so you just say up front that you have to ask all these questions. That way it covers other potentially awkward questions (income, education, age, etc.) and the cost of all those extra words is amortized over the whole form.
Mar
14
revised Usage of “Free-to-play”
deleted 14 characters in body
Mar
14
comment How do you politely ask for someone's gender?
+1ing this, because the "I'm required to ask this" seems to be standard practice now for questions that the questioner fears might not produce a good reaction in some people. If nothing else, the person you are talking to has likely heard this line before.
Mar
14
comment How do you politely ask for someone's gender?
@SpehroPefhany - It seems that way to me too. But I'm nearing 50, so that could just be an old fuddy-duddy being set in his ways. "Dealing with" us is going to become more and more a matter of trying to be patient while visiting us at The Home.
Mar
14
comment How do you politely ask for someone's gender?
@KristinaLopez - Still, that was 20 years ago. The younger generation has pretty much gotten over this, and will sometimes even introduce themselves with their preferred gender identification and pronoun list.
Mar
14
revised How do you politely ask for someone's gender?
added 15 characters in body