Reputation
14,920
Next privilege 15,000 Rep.
Protect questions
Badges
1 22 56
Impact
~1.8m people reached

1d
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
4
comment Is 'r' in Br/Amr pronunciation of Arjmand (Persian word) silent?
@Mitch - That is what the link says for SAE. But it doesn't say that for the non-rhotic accents in the US NorthEast (you could still be right, but if so its news to me). But if you think AAVE is going away any time soon, you're dreaming.
Feb
3
comment English equivalent for “Don't burn your house to smoke out a rat!”
From what I can see about that movie, its very well-known in England due probably to the cast (and production company) being mostly English, but I'm not sure how well-known it is elsewhere. I've never seen it personally (seen BC&SK at least 4 times), but I had heard of it thanks to having a cube-mate from England. We had pretty much this exact conversation between the two of us a year ago. :-)
Feb
2
comment English equivalent for “Don't burn your house to smoke out a rat!”
Where I'm from, shotgunning something implies drinking it as fast as it can flow out of a secondary hole in the container. If you used it in another sense, you'd be quite likely to be misunderstood.
Feb
2
comment English equivalent for “Don't burn your house to smoke out a rat!”
I've read Sci-Fi novels (Honor Harrigton series?) that used variants with sci-fi weaponry. So I think this is A Thing, but you can use whatever ridiculously uncalled for weaponry or blunt instrument strikes your fancy at the moment.
Feb
2
comment How should I say “I don't have anything useful to say so I am quiet”?
Actually, not bad advice. For texts, I believe this is the exact situation the thumbs-up emoji was created for. (or 100 for a stronger concurrence)
Feb
2
comment English equivalent for “Don't burn your house to smoke out a rat!”
Interesting, but if we are referencing movie one-liners, I think the proper reference would be "You think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?" from 1969's Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. I use that one myself all the time. FWIW, that vote you refer to only polled Brits.
Feb
2
comment English equivalent for “Don't burn your house to smoke out a rat!”
I used to hear this one a lot more decades ago. I don't know if its on the decline, or I just hang out in different circles these days.
Jan
26
comment What's an antonym of demonize (other than deify)?
While lionize technically doesn't quite capture the religious connotations that "demonize" has, it is in fact both the word I'd pick were I writing, and the word I believe I'd most likely hear another native writer use in this context. The other answers are all good too, but only in specific context. This is the general word.
Jan
20
comment When talking to American clients, should I say “smoothie” or “milkshake”?
I've had a lot of milkshakes (and malts) in my day. There was even a period where I routinely got one with every meal. I don't believe I have ever once ordered one separately from the meal as "desert". Its usually been an (expensive) alternate to having a water-based drink like a pop (soda/code/ or whatever they call it in your dialect area) with the meal.
Jan
16
comment Opposite idiom for going with the flow
@Idos - It doesn't work there any worse than "going with the flow" does. I'd suggest rephrasing if you wanna use either. Both are verb phrases, and your context requires an adjective
Jan
16
answered Opposite idiom for going with the flow
Jan
8
answered Word for “Vicarious Shame”? (Spanish: “vergüenza ajena”)
Dec
31
comment Is it okay to use the word “Negro” in a historical context?
If you're worried about it, throw a "what is called..." or "what was called..." in there, to emphasize that this isn't your words.
Dec
29
comment Is the term “graphic novel” restricted to works of fiction?
I do like it in theory, (the theory being that we had the power to wipe away current usage and start afresh). Although even there I think you'd have people in the "graphic books" aisles looking for what my mother-in-law calls "bodice-rippers." ... or worse yet, the confusion causing that kind of material to take over the format (as happened with the designated adult "X" rating and movies).
Dec
29
comment Is the term “graphic novel” restricted to works of fiction?
Well, as I said there are those in official circles that agree with you. For myself, I'm uncomfortable with that term in part because it ghettoizes non-fiction, and in part because it sounds like a euphemism for porn. (Wouldn't that be a weird fetish?). But as a linguistic descriptive matter, a quick search shows that people do in fact commonly refer to non-fiction comics as "graphic novels".
Dec
18
revised Is the term “graphic novel” restricted to works of fiction?
added 146 characters in body
Dec
18
revised Is the term “graphic novel” restricted to works of fiction?
added 146 characters in body
Dec
18
answered Is the term “graphic novel” restricted to works of fiction?
Dec
15
awarded  Great Answer