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Apr
23
revised Proper usage of “bogus”
added 17 characters in body
Apr
23
answered Proper usage of “bogus”
Apr
22
comment In which countries would “tags” be understood to mean “License plates and stickers that show the registration is currently valid”?
Correct. In my state at least, license plates must be purchased from a "Tag agent", so that is in fact the government-accepted word for a license plate.
Apr
11
answered What is a phrase for movie theaters that show few-month-old movies at discount rates?
Apr
9
comment meaning of word “brythonic” in english
If you want information on who the historical Brythonic peoples were, the History stack is probably a better place to ask. Brythonic is very distantly related to English (they are both Indo-European, but so are Italian and Farsi), so the answer wouldn't really be on-topic here.
Apr
9
revised meaning of word “brythonic” in english
added 19 characters in body
Apr
9
answered meaning of word “brythonic” in english
Apr
3
comment AmE: “take out the trash” vs. “take out the garbage”
@HotLicks - And I still don't even understand the concept of that. I suspect you'd have to think there's some kind of difference between the words for even the idea of that to make sense.
Apr
3
comment AmE: “take out the trash” vs. “take out the garbage”
@HotLicks - Such a thing as a policy that talks about defining a difference. There is no difference. They are the same thing, and there are no rules I'm aware of about treating different kinds of trash/garbage differently. Except perhaps recyclables.
Apr
3
comment AmE: “take out the trash” vs. “take out the garbage”
@HotLicks - I honestly don't think it would make sense to attempt such a thing here, because they mean the exact same thing to nearly everyone, so any "definition" would look to most people like it was made up on the spot. There is honestly no difference in nuance to grab hold of. It would be like trying to define the difference between a "street" and a "place" here (also synonymous. Our street names alternate between them.)
Apr
3
comment AmE: “take out the trash” vs. “take out the garbage”
This answer IMHO shows precisely why I don't like dictionary authority answers. The "In modern American usage..." sentence is garbage (and trash). Where I live they are the same. Reading the other answers, I'm not alone. So its just flat out wrong.
Apr
3
answered AmE: “take out the trash” vs. “take out the garbage”
Apr
2
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
2
comment Sabotaging through purposeful procrastination
@ChrisH - Mostly. Some people will just do that on their own for personal reasons. (eg: Ticked about not getting a promotion, they don't like you...)
Apr
1
answered Sabotaging through purposeful procrastination
Mar
30
comment What type of literary device is this?
Agreed. Even then though, "perceive", or "understand the communicated concept" is a perfectly normal definition for "see". (eg: "I see what you are saying"). So you can say that this is using one of the more metaphorical definitions of "see", but calling it a full-blown literary device is a bit much.
Mar
30
comment Is there any word for a person who doesn't want to connect with others?
A "DMV clerk" ?
Mar
29
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
14
comment “Piece” as a verb, meaning to snack?
+1. Note that extreme SE Kansas is an area in the USA where Southern Midland is the predominant dialect. This particular dialect is said to be heavily influenced by Scots-Irish immigrants.