Reputation
46,113
Next tag badge:
373/400 score
80/80 answers
Badges
7 117 186
Impact
~5.8m people reached

Jun
22
comment Where did the “unavailable” meaning of “Out of Pocket” come from?
@the0ther: O. Henry probably didn't make it up, but is just the first one we know who'd written it down somewhere. Others most likely had already been using it in speech, and others may have written it down too.
Jun
12
comment The Evolution of Trolls
Possible duplicate of english.stackexchange.com/q/14149/9001
Jun
5
comment Origin of the word “facebook”?
It's all on Wikipedia: "Harvard did not have a student "Facebook" (a directory with photos and basic information) " en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Facebook#History / "A face book or Facebook is a printed or web directory found at American universities consisting of individuals’ photographs and names. In particular, it denotes publications of this type distributed by university administrations at the start of the academic year with the intention of helping students get to know each other."
Jun
2
comment What is the etymology of the word “bae”?
For something like bae, I think it's very hard to make statements with any certainty about first use or even about any of its earliest uses. I expect it was used in speech a long time before the 2003 UD entry.
Jun
2
comment What is the etymology of the word “bae”?
@WS2 BAe is now BAE Systems.
May
20
comment Yikes! Where did it come from?
You should send your antedatings to the OED: public.oed.com/the-oed-today/contribute-to-the-oed
Apr
16
comment Origin of “come in handy”
@Mari-LouA: Thanks, fixed!
Apr
16
comment Is 'bug' a term or a slang word?
@SvenYargs I don't mind at all!
Apr
15
comment Is 'bug' a term or a slang word?
Really? A term must have an unambiguous synonym to be considered slang? Can you link to anywhere else that gives a similar definition of slang?
Apr
15
comment Is 'bug' a term or a slang word?
Bug was also used in computing software in 1944, three years before Hopper's 1947 moth: "Ran test problem. Mr. Durfee from I.B.M. was here to help us find 'bugs.'" See english.stackexchange.com/a/41116/9001
Apr
15
comment Is 'bug' a term or a slang word?
@Wudang It was used in computing software three years before Hopper's moth: "Ran test problem. Mr. Durfee from I.B.M. was here to help us find 'bugs.'" See english.stackexchange.com/a/41116/9001
Apr
4
comment Phrasal verb “be a thing”
@FaheemMitha Yep, all original research. Thanks!
Feb
19
comment Why is “decimate” still linked to its number-specific definition when other similar words are not?
The answer's in the third word of the question: pedantry.
Feb
16
comment Knock me over with a feather
And here is the September 1796 by Cobbett, in an 1801 collection, which antedates the OED's 1853 by a fair whack.
Feb
16
comment Knock me over with a feather
The Rural Rides link is broken.
Jan
28
comment Is it a good practice to refer to countries, ships etc using the feminine form?
@MarcusJ: It doesn't necessarily justify it, but ships are still often referred to using feminine pronouns, especially by the Royal Navy. It often makes sense to adjust your language for your audience.
Jan
28
comment Is it a good practice to refer to countries, ships etc using the feminine form?
Pendant? Pedant. (Sorry.)
Jan
25
comment Looking for the source of “SJO” or “South Jersey Original”?
@HarrySweeney: Please can you give an example of it used in context? I can't find anything online.
Jan
25
comment Etymology for “loganamnosis”
@BrianHitchcock: No, it's not a+ but ana+, from ana + mimneskein, back + to remember. EtymOnline says: "recollection, remembrance," 1650s, from Greek anamnesis "a calling to mind, remembrance," noun of action from stem of anamimneskein "to remember, to remind (someone) of (something), make mention of," from ana "back" (see ana-) + mimneskesthai "to recall, cause to remember" (see amnesia).
Jan
1
comment Where and when did “Bucket List” come to mean what it does today?
I really doubt the modern meaning of "things to do before you die" has anything to do with direct access data structures for efficiently selecting polygons. Their names are coincidental.