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Jul
7
comment Origin of the phrase “Now we're cooking with _”
@fool4jesus Oh, also the recording, gaming, life insurance, certification and multimedia industries have ears.
Jul
1
comment English subways have 'Cars', but English Surface Trains have 'Carriages'. Why the Difference?
Carriage is also used for underground trains. For example: Terrified passengers flee smoke filled Tube carriage on the Central line
Jun
19
comment What is the etymology and meaning of “fill your boots”?
Is there any evidence the phrase was ever actually used by William of Orange in 1690? The earliest evidence I found is mid-20th century.
Jun
19
comment What is the etymology and meaning of “fill your boots”?
Is there any evidence the phrase was ever actually used "in ancient sea fairing days"? The earliest evidence I found is mid-20th century.
Jun
18
comment Version control messages: what tense?
See also exquisitetweets.com/collection/hugovk/1258 programmers.stackexchange.com/q/56031/25708 programmers.stackexchange.com/q/157590/25708 stackoverflow.com/q/3580013/724176 stackoverflow.com/q/1753808/724176
Jun
18
comment Should I use past tense or present tense when writing check-in/commit comment?
See also exquisitetweets.com/collection/hugovk/1258 programmers.stackexchange.com/q/56031/25708 programmers.stackexchange.com/q/157590/25708 programmers.stackexchange.com/q/56031/25708 stackoverflow.com/q/3580013/724176 stackoverflow.com/q/1753808/724176
Jun
13
comment Is it appropriate to use question marks in email?
@nnori: Now you bring it up, I don't think it's necessarily all that uncommon. My guess is some think it makes it appear more formal, and perhaps this is indeed more common and perhaps more "acceptable" in Indian English, but I can't really comment on that.
Jun
13
comment Is it appropriate to use question marks in email?
Perhaps, but you didn't say where you're from (or where your professor is), and I don't know of any cultures where a single question mark makes a question rude (multiple question marks is another matter.)
Jun
12
comment What is the “pie” in “Cutie Pie”?
I found it in the Chronicling America archive. Click the newspaper name for a link to the site.
Jun
12
comment What is the “pie” in “Cutie Pie”?
I've sent this antedating to the OED.
Jun
12
comment What is the “pie” in “Cutie Pie”?
I found a 1916 referring to a person.
Jun
12
comment “log in to” or “log into” or “login to”
@Josh61: This is an answer, from a descriptionist point of view from someone who deals with this a lot, rather than prescriptionist.
Jun
10
comment Origin of an ethnic slur
The 1797 is irrelevant. It has SHEEN, SHEENY: Bright, glittering, shewy. SHEEN, Brightness, splendour. Here's the full book.
Jun
10
comment “Email” or “e-mail”?
(The last three images are broken)
Jun
8
comment Who is the guardian of the protégé
Why the •s in pro•té•gé?
Jun
2
comment Origin of doolally [tap]
Yes. There's a whole raft of [place] [word-for-fever] names, like Malta dog, Hong Kong dog, Ceylon sore mouth, Aztec two-step, Greek gallop, Rome runs, Tokyo trots, from soldiers and sailors getting sick in hot places (english.stackexchange.com/a/50805/9001). This sounds like originally just another variant, that's then changed meanings and lost the tap.
Jun
2
comment Origin of doolally [tap]
I've sent the antedatings to the OED.
May
30
comment Does “so called” have a negative connotation in English?
Here's an example of so-called being used to explain a technical tem: the company had not installed a so-called "acoustic switch" on the blowout preventer theguardian.com/environment/2010/may/03/…
May
27
comment Why would you “throw” a party?
@DavidRicherby: The OED or a contributor :)
May
27
comment Why would you “throw” a party?
(Well, Google have made their Google Books feedback channel even worse: now only authors or copyright holders can report issues with books. The authors are dead. There is no copyright. On the other hand, HathiTrust have a helpful popup form to report problems.)