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Apr
11
comment When did the word “snafu” enter the colloquial vernacular?
@Pete: I do have HTTPS Everywhere installed, but disabling it or removing the https don't make a difference. Right clicking and opening in a new tab shows it, but it's not really an image so perhaps that's the problem.
Apr
10
comment How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?
@JLG: Don't trust everything you read on Wikipedia. In this case they've got their references wrong.
Apr
10
comment When did the word “snafu” enter the colloquial vernacular?
The Ngram doesn't show for me.
Apr
9
comment “To book” used as “to run”
We have a question for the origin here: english.stackexchange.com/a/54273/9001
Apr
9
comment “To book” used as “to run”
"To book" dates from at least the 1960s: english.stackexchange.com/a/54273/9001
Apr
1
comment OED Appeals: Origin of “bimble”
Are you suggesting a connection between the kitten's name and the word for a leisurely wander?
Mar
25
comment Etymology of “French fries”
-1 This answer contains some misleading copying and pasting from The Straight Dope, who tell the story of the French court as a background to the potato's popularity. "So how did potatoes come to their present popularity?" is the missing line from the first paragraph. Only later is: "And so we arrive at your question."
Mar
21
comment Source of the term Munter (unattractive person)
Jan 1997: "Briefly: I love parties and dancing myself into a trance, sweating and getting munted." groups.google.com/forum/#!searchin/uk.music.rave/… Aug 1997 discussion/explanation: groups.google.com/forum/#!searchin/uk.music.rave/…
Mar
21
comment Source of the term Munter (unattractive person)
Seems uk.music.rave used munt/munter/munting as "the act of going out raving and all that it entails". Some FAQ links: groups.google.com/forum/#!searchin/uk.music.rave/faq|sort:date/… web.archive.org/web/19990508191050/http://www.bristol-rave.org/… web.archive.org/web/19990508201521/http://www.bristol-rave.org/…
Mar
21
comment Source of the term Munter (unattractive person)
I'm not sure which came first, but perhaps this meaning of completely wasted was transferred to an unattractive person, both which may be found in nightclubs.
Mar
21
comment Source of the term Munter (unattractive person)
Munter can also mean a drunk, from a Germanic word for merry. You can be munted if you're very drunk, or wasted. And a munter can be someone intoxicated on either alcohol or drugs, as seems to be used in uk.music.raveback to 1997.
Mar
19
comment Why are bankers called “the Platform”?
Yes, new to me too!
Mar
19
comment Why are bankers called “the Platform”?
Thanks! The first explains the origin. The rest are just to show the job title has been in use constantly for about a hundred years (the first comment (with two upvotes) on the question thought it's specific to one bank, and it's clearly not).
Mar
19
comment Origin of the expression “you can't make chicken salad out of chicken something else”
Yeah, not everyone knows about Wayback Machine, and they don't have everything. The top answer gives oter reasons for avoiding link-only answers: answers should be answers, not directions to answers.
Mar
19
comment Origin of the expression “you can't make chicken salad out of chicken something else”
Linkrot is when the URL or website of a link changes and the link no longer works. It means your answer won't be useful in the future when that happens and it's better to avoid that now. Link-only answers are discouraged on SE.
Mar
19
comment Origin of the expression “you can't make chicken salad out of chicken something else”
Please summarise the link to avoid linkrot.
Mar
19
comment If something is considered the best why is it said to be “the berries”?
I've never heard it, but I don't think it was short-lived: newspapers thought it was "funny" enough to use "It's the berries!" as a headline for any berry-related story at least between the 1940s and 2000s.
Mar
19
comment Why are bankers called “the Platform”?
@Chenmunka: "Platform officer" has been used for 100 years in banks. See my answer.
Mar
5
comment Since when is capital of a country used to denote government actions?
This is E L&U. Cicero didn't write in English in 43 BC. When was metonymy first used in English? (Probably the same question as: when was English first used?)
Feb
27
comment Why is uploading termed 'uploading' and downloading termed 'downloading'?
@DavidM: Here's a quick 1870: "The rate of carriage current about that time was £20 uploading from Rockhampton, and £10 from Broadsound to Clermont; while wool and copper as down-loading was taken at £13 to £14."