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bio website synchronicity.sourceforge.net
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age 22
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen May 2 at 0:36

Mar
24
comment Concatenate vs. Catenate
Side note: Okasaki, in his famous Purely functional data structures book, consistently uses "catenate", but it's indeed one of the rare examples I have ever come by.
Mar
12
comment A word for “someone you meet with”
Sure; I was curious whether there was a single word for this though. The other answers are fine.
Mar
12
comment A word for “someone you meet with”
Regarding "visitor", doesn't that suggest that they are coming? If I have a meeting with my lawyer at 2PM, I can't really call them my "visitor", right?
Mar
12
comment A word for “someone you meet with”
That's nice, I didn't know meeting could be used in the same way as appointment.
Mar
12
comment A word for “someone you meet with”
In other words: I'm not going to reject a suggestion because I can't use it to name a variable at all; it's the fact that I was trying to name a variable that made me realize I didn't know a proper word.
Mar
12
comment A word for “someone you meet with”
The naming was really more of a pretext than the real reason and that's why I didn't mention it in the question. I've upvoted the answer with "attendee" because it sounds like a nice fit for my question; other suggestions that I have "rejected" I did mostly because they didn't fit in the "general meeting" question.
Mar
12
comment A word for “someone you meet with”
@Mari-LouA: You might also just meet them for dinner, and everyone pays for themselves. You don't need to be paying for them, and that's what guest seems to suggest to me.
Mar
12
comment A word for “someone you meet with”
Isn't conferee specific to conferences? Pretty word though
Mar
12
comment A word for “someone you meet with”
Attendee sounds nice indeed, although it does suggest a large meeting.
Mar
12
comment A word for “someone you meet with”
Doesn't that suggest that the guest is coming to your office/place? If you meet them in a neutral place (say a cafe), are they your guest? "guess" seems to suggest that you are inviting them, is that incorrect?
Mar
12
comment A word for “someone you meet with”
I should probably have given a bit more context. I do need a word, not an alternate phrasing. It's in a programming context; I have a "Meeting" class with a field that describes the person that the user is meeting. I'm looking for a name for that field.
Mar
12
comment A word for “someone you meet with”
@FumbleFingers: It's a programming context. A Meeting class with a field that describes the person that the user is meeting. I'm looking for a name for that field.
Mar
11
comment A word for “someone you meet with”
On second thought, perhaps "other party" would do? Sounds a bit formal though.
Nov
17
comment Why don't Americans write “devor” instead of “devour”?
@Wudang You mean via French (dévorer) via old French (dévour), not the other way around ;)
May
19
comment Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray: “I wonder will you understand me?”
@Boob: He isn't sure at all of the answer, and instead genuinely wondering, I think (at least that's my understanding of the book ;). I've added details under you answer; thanks for your time!
May
19
comment Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray: “I wonder will you understand me?”
Thanks for your explanation! I added extra details under Ben Hocking's answer.
May
19
comment Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray: “I wonder will you understand me?”
(contd) Introducing a direct question usually requires, I believe, a separation of some kind, usually punctuation; for example you could write I asked: when will his train reached the station? as a replacement for the previous example. Quotes, as Matthew suggested, would be another possibility to introduce such a direct question. What troubled me was the lack of such an separation between the introductory clause, I wonder, and the direct question, Will you understand me =)
May
19
comment Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray: “I wonder will you understand me?”
What troubles me here is that (by today's standards), Wilde seems to be using a direct question (one such as Will you understand me?) where an indirect one would be expected (I wonder if you will understand me). Consider for example the difference between I asked when his train would reach the station and When will his train reach the station?, the former being indirect and the latter, direct.
May
19
comment Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray: “I wonder will you understand me?”
@Boob: I think that the difference here is that the question clause, in your example, is introduced by if, making it an indirect question, similar to I wonder if you will understand me. On the other hand, my example in the present tense would probably sound like I wonder do you understand me, which without a question mark does sound strange, doesn't it? =)
May
19
comment Structure of “As I passed by there looked out from it the face I showed you this afternoon”
Thanks a lot for the examples!