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  • 85 votes cast
Feb
16
comment Does the difference between an adjective and an adverb ever disambiguate?
I literally don't know how one would make a question less broad than a straight binary yes/no question.
Feb
12
comment Does the difference between an adjective and an adverb ever disambiguate?
@EdwinAshworth on a narrow reading of the question, it is a factual question: are there cases where the distinction makes a difference? Your examples are an answer to that question. This being a question and answer website, it seems obvious what you should do...
Feb
11
comment Does the difference between an adjective and an adverb ever disambiguate?
@EdwinAshworth those examples look like valid examples, why not turn your comment into an answer?
Feb
11
comment Does the difference between an adjective and an adverb ever disambiguate?
And could those who downvoted the question explain what is wrong with the question so that I can improve it?
Feb
11
comment Does the difference between an adjective and an adverb ever disambiguate?
I wasn't suggesting we give anything up. I was asking for examples of how the giving up would affect the expressive power of the language.
Nov
4
comment “As [adjective] as a [noun]” vs “as [adjective] a [noun] as there”
There's no assumption that the set of fascinating things is finite: just that there is such a thing as a "most fascinating thing".
Sep
17
comment Why did only English undergo the Great Vowel Shift, making pronunciation stray so far from spelling?
I now live in Munich. I take it all back: Bavarians are so wrong about German pronunciation.
Mar
31
comment What does “What are you up to?” mean?
@BenLee The rules of grammar Yoda does not adhere to.
Feb
13
comment Is the word “epic” being used correctly these days?
This question is AWESOME. I am in awe of it.
Jan
21
comment Is there a correct gender-neutral, singular pronoun (“his” versus “her” versus “their”)?
@tchrist What is "it" if not a gender neutral pronoun? What does agency have to do with a grammatical fact about whether a pronoun discloses a gender? I'm not suggesting "it" as an answer here. I'm merely pointing out that what the OP wants might not be best described as a "gender neutral pronoun". It was pedantic, and possibly misguided, but what you said doesn't speak to the point I was making.
Dec
8
comment Why did “insofar” become a word, not “insofaras”?
@FumbleFingers I don't think this is a duplicate. I am specifically asking about why "insofar" is a word and "insofaras" is not. It is certainly a related question, but it is not the same question.
Dec
7
comment Why did only English undergo the Great Vowel Shift, making pronunciation stray so far from spelling?
Native German speakers regularly mispronounce certain German words? Sounds a little bit presrciptivist there. Surely however they regularly pronounce them is the right pronounciation?
Dec
7
comment Why did “insofar” become a word, not “insofaras”?
The point is this: long and regular association of these words in this order: "in so far" led to them being written as one word. Why didn't the same process produce "insofaras" given that almost all case of the former are cases of the latter?
Dec
7
comment Why did “insofar” become a word, not “insofaras”?
Well sure, but "in" "so" and "far" are words that are used in other contexts too. The point is that the majority or uses of "insofar" are "insofar as" uses.
Aug
9
comment If I help “evacuate” a building, what am I doing to the people?
@FumbleFingers My comment about wanting a synoynm to avoid confusion is still justified. Historical usage of words is hardly irrelevant since that is, in large part, the determinant of current usage. In this case, it's true that modern usage has changed, but to claim that historical usage is irrelevant seems overkill.
Aug
9
comment If I help “evacuate” a building, what am I doing to the people?
@PLL You're right. Serves me right for not carefully reading all the definitions.
Aug
9
comment If I help “evacuate” a building, what am I doing to the people?
I had a quick look in Strunk & White, but it wasn't in the index so I gave up...
Aug
8
comment If I help “evacuate” a building, what am I doing to the people?
@FumbleFingers I don't think there's as much agreement as all that. First, the OED online doesn't make it clear it can be used like that, second there was this thing I vaguely remember reading complaining about exactly that usage. Let's say I wanted a synoynm because I was worried about the ambiguity. I might also be worried about the ambiguity of movement but that's another question. Does its being an odd request make it an invalid question? (Someone who downvoted obviously thought so).
Aug
8
comment If I help “evacuate” a building, what am I doing to the people?
@z7sg That depends on your sources. Also I don't think one "should" counts as "I keep saying should"... Read it as "What should she have said..." (if she was interested in making clear she was referring to the evacuation of a building, not to her most recent bowel movement. Both of which Horatio might have helped with.
Aug
8
comment If I help “evacuate” a building, what am I doing to the people?
Horatio did none of these things to the poor woman in the question. Well, maybe he helped her withdraw, but that seems a stretch... None has the connotation of evacuate.