1,457 reputation
11029
bio website seamusbradley.net
location Munich, Germany
age 29
visits member for 4 years, 7 months
seen Mar 16 at 10:47

profile for Seamus on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites

I am a postdoc in philosophy.

I contribute to a blog for philosophers who use LaTeX. If you fall in to that niche, check it out: PhilTeX. (The blog will be of use to all kind of humanities scholars using LaTeX, I imagine, but it was started by, and is run by philosophers...) The blog is currently defunct, but may be resurrected soon.

I made this beamer colour change package that slowly changes the colour of structure elements of beamer presentations. Feedback welcome. I also made this moreenum package which adds new enumeration options. The TeX goodies page of my website includes some other bits and bobs I've done.


Sep
6
comment Are there sentences in languages which use grammatical gender that lose meaning when translated into English?
That is the joke. Jeez... The second guy corrects him...
Sep
6
comment Plurals of foreign words
I guess the question then is: "what counts as frequent use?"
Sep
6
comment Why is “can I get” replacing “could I have”?
I knew someone who speculated that it's because the hard "g" and "t" of "get" are more assertive sounds than the softer "h" and "v" of "have". I like this theory.
Sep
5
comment Why do some words have two past tense forms (e.g. “dreamed” vs. “dreamt”)?
Wow. I'd never noticed that. Weird.
Sep
5
comment If the result of creating is creation
How about acquisition?
Sep
5
comment Naïve, naïf, naïvety, naïveté
I do write "Motörhead"
Sep
5
comment Plurals of foreign words
Well, "lemmae" is definitely wrong. For the same reason "octopi" is. The word "lemmata" certainly is used. I've seen it used myself. CoHA searches for "lemma*" aren't going to turn up much before 1900 because before then the majority of mathematics research was done in German and before that French or Latin.
Sep
5
comment Naïve, naïf, naïvety, naïveté
Interesting that naïf can be used as a noun...
Sep
5
revised Naïve, naïf, naïvety, naïveté
accents added; deleted 111 characters in body
Sep
4
asked Plurals of foreign words
Sep
4
asked Naïve, naïf, naïvety, naïveté
Sep
4
comment Why do some words have two past tense forms (e.g. “dreamed” vs. “dreamt”)?
Really? I'd never noticed that people ever use "proven" on TV in American TV shows...
Sep
4
comment Are there sentences in languages which use grammatical gender that lose meaning when translated into English?
No. "Look at the fly", basically. Is "mouche" even a French verb?
Sep
4
answered Are there sentences in languages which use grammatical gender that lose meaning when translated into English?
Sep
4
comment Why do some words have two past tense forms (e.g. “dreamed” vs. “dreamt”)?
My understanding was that "proven" even in British English was fairly outdated and normally reserved for when using "prove" to mean "test" rather than "demonstrate"
Sep
4
comment Examples of different roots (and different meanings) coming to be spelled the same
@Shinto Sherlock I'm trying to work out what you meant by your first comment. I don't see how it's relevant to the question I asked.
Sep
4
comment Regarding Re: ; what is the correct usage in an email subject line?
You missed a golden opportunity to call this question "Re: "Re:""
Sep
4
comment Examples of different roots (and different meanings) coming to be spelled the same
@Shinto Sherlock I don't see how these words' rarity is at all relevant
Sep
4
comment What does “graduate applicant” mean?
@Rowland Shaw I'm not sure what you mean. Whatever "graduate applicant" is supposed to mean, I don't think it should refer to undergraduates... There doesn't seem to be a relationship worth mentioning.
Sep
3
asked Examples of different roots (and different meanings) coming to be spelled the same