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Aug
8
comment If I help “evacuate” a building, what am I doing to the people?
@z7sg That depends on your sources. Also I don't think one "should" counts as "I keep saying should"... Read it as "What should she have said..." (if she was interested in making clear she was referring to the evacuation of a building, not to her most recent bowel movement. Both of which Horatio might have helped with.
Aug
8
revised If I help “evacuate” a building, what am I doing to the people?
made it less prescriptive sounding.
Aug
8
comment If I help “evacuate” a building, what am I doing to the people?
Horatio did none of these things to the poor woman in the question. Well, maybe he helped her withdraw, but that seems a stretch... None has the connotation of evacuate.
Aug
8
comment If I help “evacuate” a building, what am I doing to the people?
@z7sg I'm looking for synonyms of one meaning of evacuate, I guess. I don't want synonyms of evacuate as in "I helped evacuate the building". I'm dreadfully sorry that I tried to do more than just post "I CAN HAZ SYNONYM". Whether or not it's correct usage, there is some ambiguity (in fairly rarified circumstances, granted). So I don't think it's "peeving"
Aug
8
comment If I help “evacuate” a building, what am I doing to the people?
See edit: let's say I don't want to use evacuate.
Aug
8
revised If I help “evacuate” a building, what am I doing to the people?
I've added some more specifics.
Aug
8
asked If I help “evacuate” a building, what am I doing to the people?
Jun
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
14
comment How does a word come to have two completely opposite meanings?
Language log seem to be suggesting that at least as far back as Aristotle it was a term for a kind of circular reasoning
Jun
14
comment How does a word come to have two completely opposite meanings?
@Unreason language is conventional sure. That doesn't mean people can't be ignorant of the proper conventions. And the conventions change over time, sure. But that doesn't mean that words don't have "correct" meanings.
Jun
14
comment How does a word come to have two completely opposite meanings?
"begs the question" originally meant "presupposes an answer to the question" rather than "ignores the question", right?
Jun
14
comment How does a word come to have two completely opposite meanings?
That seems such an incredible coincidence, though, doesn't it? That two words with completely distinct (actually opposite) meanings, and distinct pronounciations should converge over time.
Jun
14
comment How does a word come to have two completely opposite meanings?
I like the ignorance explanation, like the use of "literally" to mean (effectively) "figuratively" as in Unreason's answer...
Jun
14
asked How does a word come to have two completely opposite meanings?
May
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
16
comment Descriptivism and widespread misspelling
@jgbelacqua Straw person? Really? That's how far politcal correctness has gone?
Mar
10
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
10
awarded  Cleanup
Mar
10
revised Whose usage determines correctness?
rolled back to a previous revision
Mar
10
comment How/From where did the term “paradigm shift” originate?
@aristoex could you update your answer to add a caveat about the fact that the early century ripple is probably a bug in ngram?