11,736 reputation
12545
bio website fsrtechnologies.com
location Los Angeles, CA
age 44
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen 13 hours ago

Dec
17
awarded  Guru
Dec
17
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
17
answered What “Extravagant culture” could be used as an antonym to “Spartan”?
Dec
1
comment Polite name for a prostitute
There are all those wonderful collective nouns/terms of venery, too: an "anthology of pros"; an "essay of trollops"; a "jam of tarts"...
Nov
27
comment Is there a single word for “one who speaks/boasts a lot about everything”?
@jwpat7 - The OP asked for a name/descriptor for the person, not for what they do. So I respectfully disagree.
Nov
5
answered If you want my sympathy, look it up in the dictionary
Oct
27
awarded  phrases
Oct
22
comment What is the meaning of the name “Wilber” in English?
I like the name Wilbur a lot; it has good historical associations (Wilbur Wright) and a solid, manly, reliable feel. However: 1) it's very old-fashioned (this could be good or bad - it's up to you!) and 2) the first thing most Americans will think of is not Wilbur Wright, but Wilbur the pig from Charlotte's Web, a beloved classic children's book and movie.
Oct
20
comment Secular phrase for “Heaven only knows” or “God only knows”?
When I buy coffee, I ask for "room for cream", so that I needn't pour any out before topping it up. Lately I've taken to asking for it "roomy - like a Sufi poet."
Oct
17
revised The meaning of “yet” in “Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears had left the flushing in her galled eyes”
Whoops! Meant to omit "yet" from my hypothetical construct!
Oct
17
answered The meaning of “yet” in “Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears had left the flushing in her galled eyes”
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
30
comment is there a word for super general advice?
Bromides?
Sep
30
comment Are there any cases of a word that originated in English replacing another word in English in common usage?
More commonly spelled widdershins, when it does appear...
Sep
29
comment “Inputted” or “input”
@Patrick - Obviously you don't have to justify it on grammatical grounds, but... could you? "Input" is derived from "put", and "putted" is absolutely NOT correct unless you're talking about golf - so it comes down to "my ear prefers this and not that".
Sep
25
comment Is there a word for “not cremated”?
Entombed, perhaps?
Sep
24
revised Bread and butter is/are my breakfast?
added 5 characters in body
Sep
24
revised Bread and butter is/are my breakfast?
added 155 characters in body
Sep
24
answered Bread and butter is/are my breakfast?