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Jul
17
comment What do you call someone who puts a hit out on someone?
@CalebBernard - In general, though, a contractor is the person who contracts to perform a service: in this case, the hitman himself. I haven't played the video game - perhaps they have it the other way around - but in that case I would say they'd got it wrong.
Jul
17
comment What do you call someone who puts a hit out on someone?
Pity it's so generic, though. Also - from the point of view of the hitman, s/he could also be called the "client" or the "customer". (Both of which are just as generic, I know.)
Jul
10
comment Is there an English equivalant to the Russian saying “the baker never buys his bread”?
@JFA - Actually, I'd say it goes both ways - a lot of my colleagues in IT actually have crappy old computers at home, and spouses/children with malware-infected rigs. You get home after a long day of dealing with technological nonsense, and you don't necessarily want to face more of it at night.
Jul
10
comment Is there an English equivalant to the Russian saying “the baker never buys his bread”?
Just seeing the title - before clicking through to read the full question - the first thing that came to mind was "the shoemaker's children go barefoot", which means that after you've done your job all day for other people you don't want to do it at home too. (In your mechanic example, I suppose it would be "the mechanic's car is always broken down.") I realize it's not what you're looking for, but now I'm curious: how many proverbs like this - with similar setups but completely different conclusions - are there?
May
15
awarded  Yearling
Apr
22
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
20
comment What is the term for a group of liches?
I played a LOT of D&D around the time that "Trading Places" came out. In one campaign, our party surprised a necromancer in his lair, and our DM sang out - in a spot-on Eddie Murphy impression - "Where my liches at?" It still makes me laugh when I think of it, and the word "lich" has cracked me up ever since.
Apr
20
comment What is the term for a group of liches?
Sounds like the OP has 99 problems, but a lich ain't one.
Mar
19
comment Technical term for “cityglow”
That's almost exactly the definition I have in mind, but it's not quite the word I'm trying to recall. This is seriously frustrating me... Anyway, definitely upvoting!
Mar
19
comment Something that is impossible but has happened
"Inconceivable!" "You keep using this word. I do not think it means what you think it means."
Mar
19
comment Technical term for “cityglow”
Also considered, and rejected: "aureole".
Mar
19
comment Technical term for “cityglow”
No, it doesn't describe what I'm talking about - albedo is a measure of reflectivity. You could speak of the albedo of the clouds above the city, but it's really not what I had in mind. But for what it's worth, I had made the libido connection - it's probably why I can't seem to move past "albedo". It's like a jigsaw puzzle piece that almost fits.
Mar
19
comment Technical term for “cityglow”
That's not quite it... but thanks.
Mar
19
asked Technical term for “cityglow”
Jan
29
answered No direct object in 'give thee faithfully to follow' ? (1670 UK, Isaac Penington)
Dec
17
awarded  Guru
Dec
17
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
17
answered What “Extravagant culture” could be used as an antonym to “Spartan”?
Dec
1
comment Polite name for a prostitute
There are all those wonderful collective nouns/terms of venery, too: an "anthology of pros"; an "essay of trollops"; a "jam of tarts"...