Reputation
12,281
Next privilege 15,000 Rep.
Protect questions
Badges
1 27 45
Newest
 Yearling
Impact
~1.3m people reached

Feb
4
comment Proverb meaning “to give something to somebody who does not recognize its value”
'On October 14, 1938 the Hartford Courant printed the celebrity gossip column of Sheilah Graham containing this tale: Dorothy Parker tells me of the last time she encountered Playwright Clare Boothe. The two ladies were trying to get out of a doorway at the same time. Clare drew back and cracked, “Age before beauty, Miss Parker.” As Dotty swept out, she turned to the other guests and said. “Pearls before swine.”' quoteinvestigator.com/2011/06/29/pearls-before-swine (Doesn't really help with the question - which is why it's a comment not an answer - but it's always cracked me up.)
Sep
30
comment What is the plural of “Mars”?
I agree that "Marses" would be acceptable, but I would avoid it as far as possible - refer to "Mars helicopters", for instance. You won't be able to avoid "Marses" entirely, but your readers will thank you for keeping it to a minimum.
Sep
20
comment Drove my chevy to the levy and the levy was dry
@user662852 - When you say "contemporary", I presume you're thinking of the Led Zeppelin song "When The Levee Breaks" (and, I presume, you mean "contemporary to Don McLean".) But that song was a reworking/homage/ripoff (depending whom you listen to) of a song first recorded in 1929, in reference to a flood that happened in 1927.
Sep
20
comment Opposite of “Sugar Daddy”: A young person supporting an older person (financially, materially, sexually)
@PapaPoule - that is just... wrong. I like it.
Sep
20
comment What does “Muslim clockmakers” mean in “He (Trump) vowed to take back the country from Muslim clockmakers?
The Borowitz Report is satire, and generally very well-crafted satire. @YoichiOishi is definitely not the first to be taken in! At times I wish that it were more clearly identified as satire, but that would ruin the joke.
Sep
10
comment What does the expression “you got to be cruel to be kind” mean?
The most famous use of this exact phrase is probably this song, popular in the 1970s. In it, Nick Lowe asks his lover why she hurts him; she essentially tells him it's a sign of her love. This is NOT the conventional meaning of the phrase - essentially, she's just using it as an excuse to be a horrible person - and if this was your first exposure to the phrase, I can certainly understand your confusion.
Aug
19
revised “I have no …” vs. “I don't have …”
added 78 characters in body
Aug
15
comment Sword of Damocles
I'd just like to point out that "Arian" almost always refers to the the teachings or followers of a 3rd-century Egyptian monk named Arius. The meaning "one born under the sign of Aries", while valid, is much less common. Doesn't invalidate the rule, of course, but muddies the waters a bit.
Aug
8
comment Is there a single-word verb meaning “to perform cunnilingus on”?
On the subject of titillation... Q: How do you titillate an ocelot? A: Oscillate its tit a lot.
Aug
8
comment Is there a single-word verb meaning “to perform cunnilingus on”?
@PeterCordes - Ain't synchronicity great?
Aug
5
comment Is there a term for joyriding without stealing a car or endangering myself?
"In me jauntin' car, me jauntin' car, joggin' around in me jauntin' car - I'm the handsomest sight by far, joggin' along in me jauntin' car." - this song has stuck with me ever since seeing the movie as a child. A jaunting car is an excellent vehicle in which to go for a jaunt.
Jul
17
comment What do you call someone who puts a hit out on someone?
@CalebBernard - In general, though, a contractor is the person who contracts to perform a service: in this case, the hitman himself. I haven't played the video game - perhaps they have it the other way around - but in that case I would say they'd got it wrong.
Jul
17
comment What do you call someone who puts a hit out on someone?
Pity it's so generic, though. Also - from the point of view of the hitman, s/he could also be called the "client" or the "customer". (Both of which are just as generic, I know.)
Jul
10
comment Is there an English equivalant to the Russian saying “the baker never buys his bread”?
@JFA - Actually, I'd say it goes both ways - a lot of my colleagues in IT actually have crappy old computers at home, and spouses/children with malware-infected rigs. You get home after a long day of dealing with technological nonsense, and you don't necessarily want to face more of it at night.
Jul
10
comment Is there an English equivalant to the Russian saying “the baker never buys his bread”?
Just seeing the title - before clicking through to read the full question - the first thing that came to mind was "the shoemaker's children go barefoot", which means that after you've done your job all day for other people you don't want to do it at home too. (In your mechanic example, I suppose it would be "the mechanic's car is always broken down.") I realize it's not what you're looking for, but now I'm curious: how many proverbs like this - with similar setups but completely different conclusions - are there?
May
15
awarded  Yearling
Apr
22
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
20
comment What is the term for a group of liches?
I played a LOT of D&D around the time that "Trading Places" came out. In one campaign, our party surprised a necromancer in his lair, and our DM sang out - in a spot-on Eddie Murphy impression - "Where my liches at?" It still makes me laugh when I think of it, and the word "lich" has cracked me up ever since.
Apr
20
comment What is the term for a group of liches?
Sounds like the OP has 99 problems, but a lich ain't one.
Mar
19
comment Technical term for “cityglow”
That's almost exactly the definition I have in mind, but it's not quite the word I'm trying to recall. This is seriously frustrating me... Anyway, definitely upvoting!