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11940
bio website fsrtechnologies.com
location Los Angeles, CA
age 44
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen 14 hours ago

2d
comment How do you differentiate “thru”, “threw”, “through”, and “thorough”?
@NeilCoffey - I would put it this way: When is it used? When an advertiser wants to save space or be cute. When should it be used? Never.
Apr
7
comment Does “the N-word” have implications other than a word used for racial discrimination?
@Mynamite - The US Navy's history FAQ simply defines D-Day as "Day set for assault by land forces"; you might be thinking of the later operations that were renamed to avoid confusion (A-Day, L-Day, X-Day, etc.): en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D-Day_(military_term)
Apr
7
comment Does “the N-word” have implications other than a word used for racial discrimination?
@Mynamite - Do you have a citation for that? 'Cause I've seen a lot of citations to say that it did just stand for Day, e.g. pbs.org/wgbh/amex/dday/sfeature/sf_info.html
Apr
5
comment When did “Pensylvania” become “Pennsylvania”?
I think you meant "the explorer Verrazano", no? Or was that a subtle joke, given the subject matter?
Apr
4
comment What did Obama mean by “ … something like this might have happened again”?
I think he avoided "should have happened" because it's so commonly interpreted as "ought to". (Imagine the fun that Breitbart.com would have had with THAT sentence!) The subjunctive would have been the grammatically correct way to phrase this - but I suspect he realized halfway through what a minefield he was about to step into, and failed to make a clean recovery.
Apr
1
comment Is it OK to use hyperopic to refer to farsightedness metaphorically?
How 'bout we split the difference: your average big-hearted individual has hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, while the Grinch - whose heart grew three sizes that day - has dilated cardiomyopathy... but they both have cardiomegaly. (Your biller will advise you that all three of these terms need further specificity to ensure payment, however. But at least, as of today, you won't have to convert to ICD-10 until next year. Thank Heaven for small mercies.)
Mar
31
comment Is it OK to use hyperopic to refer to farsightedness metaphorically?
... and by the way - I believe a person with a big heart simply has cardiomegaly, in keeping with my theme of syllabic reduction... =D
Mar
31
comment Is it OK to use hyperopic to refer to farsightedness metaphorically?
I run into constructions of this kind all the time in technical writing and business mumbo-jumbo, and they raise my hackles every time. This particular instance happens to be a few hundred years old, but...
Mar
31
comment Is it OK to use hyperopic to refer to farsightedness metaphorically?
Never use two syllables where eight will do!
Mar
31
comment Is it OK to use hyperopic to refer to farsightedness metaphorically?
@DavidM - If mellifluousness is the goal, how about "foresightednessfullnessishness"? I believe that would be the quality of having the quality of having the quality of foresight...
Mar
31
comment Is it OK to use hyperopic to refer to farsightedness metaphorically?
I would have had no objection at all if you'd just recommended "foresight", by the way.
Mar
31
comment Is it OK to use hyperopic to refer to farsightedness metaphorically?
@DavidM - "Foresightedness" seems ridiculous to me for the same reason that "beautifulness" would. First we have a quality x; we add a suffix to turn it into an adjective meaning "possessing quality x"; then we add a suffix to mean "the quality of possessing quality x". I don't dispute that it's in the dictionary; given time, a lot of tripe ends up in the dictionary - see irregardless. I do dispute that it ought to be recommended.
Mar
31
comment Is it OK to use hyperopic to refer to farsightedness metaphorically?
According to the good people of Etymonline (as cited by Dictionary.com), "farsighted" was first used - in a positive sense - in the 1640s, while the "hyperopia" sense didn't appear until 1878. History and literary tradition are on the side of "farsighted" being a good thing.
Mar
31
comment Is it OK to use hyperopic to refer to farsightedness metaphorically?
You've definitely missed my point... Where is the base noun in "weakness"?
Mar
31
comment Is it OK to use hyperopic to refer to farsightedness metaphorically?
"Foresightedness" is an abomination. The trait is "foresight"; one who has foresight is "foresighted"; it's ridiculous to add -ness to get back to where you started. In contrast, "farsight" is not a common noun; "farsightedness" actually makes sense. Ngrams (not an authority, I know) seem to agree with me: books.google.com/ngrams/…
Mar
31
answered Is it OK to use hyperopic to refer to farsightedness metaphorically?
Mar
28
comment What is is called when you count the letters in an acronym, name or word with an ordinal multiplier?
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 - For the benefit of visitors to this site who aren't programmers (what are the odds?), i18n stands for "internationalization", while l10n stands for "localization"; they describe different aspects of making a particular program/web page/app accessible to users from different languages/parts of the world.
Mar
24
comment Etymology of “French fries”
@ermanen - True, but at least we can eliminate the WWI origin story; the term was pre-existing. Here's a reference from 1901, for example: books.google.com/…
Mar
24
comment Etymology of “French fries”
As Edwin pointed out, the term "French fries" in American usage is much older than WWI. Here's a decently-researched article on the debate between French and Belgian origins: todayifoundout.com/index.php/2010/09/…
Mar
20
comment What is a word to describe blatant praise by a shill?
Meretricious, and a Happy New Year!