10,938 reputation
12042
bio website fsrtechnologies.com
location Los Angeles, CA
age 44
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen 2 hours ago

Jul
17
comment “A friar's hand”?
Remember that this is a work of literature, and that novelists can take liberties with the English language that journalists or academic writers cannot (or at least should not). Think of a phrase like this not as a "mistake", but as artistic license.
Jul
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
27
comment “Soccer mom”: why soccer?
Not a problem; it's gone. Quite apart from this question, though, I really wish that more people knew the actual origin of the word; not only because it's interesting in itself, but as a cultural-anthropological artifact in US/UK relations.
Jun
26
comment “Soccer mom”: why soccer?
@FrancisDavey - What I meant by "tainted" was simply the widespread assumption that it's an Americanism, and therefore something to be avoided by self-respecting Britons. As I've tried to establish above, that's not actually true - so I'm glad that your region hadn't fallen for it as of the 1970s. I wonder, though: if you were to poll current students at your old school, do they still say "soccer"? And possibly a follow-up question: do they think it's a British term, or an Americanism?
Jun
26
comment “Soccer mom”: why soccer?
I confess that - until a few years ago - I assumed that "soccer" was an Americanism, and a recent one: from the 1970s, perhaps. Once I found out that it derived from 'association', it immediately felt a lot more Victorian-era British to me; 1886 sounds about right. But I'm actually shocked that it appeared in American usage as early as 1907 - that, to me, is more surprising than anything else.
Jun
26
comment “Soccer mom”: why soccer?
If anyone's interested, the earliest (real, as opposed to OCR error) instance of soccer I've found is from an 1886 "Oxford Letter" from the City of London School magazine. The first American instance I find is 21 years later, in a Harvard fraternity magazine.
Jun
8
comment What do these sentences mean in “The Picture of Dorian Gray”?
To a 21st-century reader it would probably be clearer with a bit more punctuation and a couple of inserted words: "The highest - (as well) as the lowest - form of criticism is a mode of autobiography." To tell the truth, I suspect it would have been clearer to 19th-century readers too; Wilde often chose elegance over clarity.
Jun
6
comment Short, Politically Correct word for Native Americans
@fredsbend - I like that even better, but "First Nations" is an actual legal term (for whatever that's worth.)
Jun
6
comment Short, Politically Correct word for Native Americans
It hasn't caught on in the US, but I really like the Canadian term "First Nations".
Jun
5
comment Is there a single-word verb meaning “to perform cunnilingus on”?
@oerkelens - Hmm. Hadn't thought of that...
Jun
4
comment An Exocentric compound for Children
Your jokes are in spore taste. ;)
Jun
4
comment Beer is made ___ yeast, water, hops, and malted barley
I think that this very passage was floating in the back of my mind when I wrote my answer - thank you for reminding me what it was! Love that book, by the way.
Jun
3
comment What did “make love” mean in the 1920s?
To clarify: I think that "make love to" has always had a hint of sensuality about it; making love (in the older sense) may or may not lead to (or include) sexual intercourse. From Samuel Pepys' Diary: "He told me... of Mrs. Stewart's going away from Court... and believes her... to be as virtuous as any woman in the world: and told me... that when the Duke of Richmond did make love to her, she did ask the King..." (shortened for length - Pepys could go on and on.)
Jun
3
comment What did “make love” mean in the 1920s?
My favorite example of the change in meaning is the Cole Porter song Mind If I Make Love To You? Cole Porter was daring in many ways - but I cannot believe that he intended it as a direct synonym for "have sex with". (The song was written in 1956, and your question is about the 1920s - but I believe the change in meaning came about in the 1960s; more research is required.)
Jun
3
comment Beer is made ___ yeast, water, hops, and malted barley
@SteveJessop - I didn't notice that - important omission! I just assumed that the ellipses indicated that the list continued. Definitely weakens my case against "with", doesn't it?
Jun
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
3
answered Beer is made ___ yeast, water, hops, and malted barley
Jun
3
comment Beer is made ___ yeast, water, hops, and malted barley
That's not the question the OP was asking, but you have contributed a vote for "from".
Jun
3
answered Is there a single-word verb meaning “to perform cunnilingus on”?
Jun
2
comment Idiom for “the first attempt (of something) is never right”
My dad used to have a poster that said "Plan to throw one away" as the caption for a photograph of a collapsed railroad bridge (the bridge had collapsed as soon as the locomotive was fully committed, so the locomotive just sits there with its nose in the river looking ridiculous). I had no idea it came from Brooks!