395 reputation
19
bio website smackfu.com
location Naugatuck, CT
age 38
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Jul 3 at 20:21

profile for smackfu on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


Aug
26
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
15
awarded  Nice Answer
May
16
comment Phrase for ending up paying for having done a favor
I don't think this phrase is common enough that it can be used without explanatory text.
May
11
awarded  Yearling
Mar
20
awarded  Autobiographer
Mar
20
comment Winter — wintry; summer — summery; spring — ?; autumn — ?
To me in Northeast US, autumn feels more formal, fall is what I would use most of the time.
Mar
20
comment Winter — wintry; summer — summery; spring — ?; autumn — ?
@LarsH: Fair enough... sometimes it's unclear whether people want a word because they're learning English, or because they want to write flowery poetry, and the answers are quite different. I don't think I've heard "vernal" used except with the equinox... ever.
Mar
20
answered Winter — wintry; summer — summery; spring — ?; autumn — ?
Mar
19
comment What does “Mitt Romney pretends to be a Nascar, cheesy-grits guy” mean?
@FumbleFingers: I was thinking more along this part of the question "What do “a Nascar” and “Cheesy-grits” symbolize?", and that they don't as such symbolize anything since they are referring to specific events. I do agree that the author could have used the same words to talk about another candidate and they would symbolize something, so... I'm not sure if it's a necessary distinction, as such.
Mar
19
comment What does “Mitt Romney pretends to be a Nascar, cheesy-grits guy” mean?
This is the correct answer because the quote is referencing specific events for Romney, rather than general stereotypes.
Mar
12
answered Plural of “a stone's throw away”?
Mar
7
awarded  Commentator
Mar
7
comment Is there a word that means both opening and closing a door?
@Izkata certainly a fair point, but if someone wishes to give answers like that, I think that should be clearly mentioned in the answer.
Mar
7
awarded  Critic
Mar
7
comment Is there a word that means both opening and closing a door?
I think suggesting wording that would make people think the person using it was not a native speaker is not particularly productive.
Aug
10
answered What would you call someone who makes no lasting impression?
Jul
19
comment The friend who travels with you
I kind of think "companion" alone has been co-opted as a SO/partner/girlfriend synonym, and would stick with "traveling companion".
Jul
15
comment What is the meaning of the terms: brown meat, black meat, white meat and red meat?
The most common place I run into this is with turkey at Thanksgiving, because all the meat is sliced before eating. So you have a plate of dark meat and a plate of light meat.
Jun
28
answered Adverb for “Cannot be topped”
Jun
23
comment Is there a difference between “holiday” and “vacation”?
"Holidays" (plural) in US English will almost always mean Christmas / New Year's time period. I presume since the other holidays only come singly.