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May
10
awarded  Good Answer
May
10
awarded  Yearling
May
10
awarded  Yearling
Feb
23
comment What does Chris Christie is “350 pounds of toast” mean?
Don't forget that the number is a fat joke. As a metaphor it's highly mixed.
Aug
7
awarded  Famous Question
May
10
awarded  Yearling
Oct
23
comment Use of “I”, “we” and the passive voice in a scientific thesis
@drknexus Thank you for reminding me why I no longer use this site.
Sep
3
awarded  Notable Question
May
31
comment Use of lone apostrophe for plural?
@Hugo: I have the Kindle version, which is scanned from the 1978 Back Bay edition. That's the same one on Google Books that I have been consulting.
May
31
revised Use of lone apostrophe for plural?
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May
30
comment Use of lone apostrophe for plural?
@Brian: It's not giving me page numbers in the preview, unfortunately. The second quote above is attached to footnote 52 in the chapter where MacArthur is still living in Manila just before the war (alas, these chapters are very long).
May
30
comment Use of lone apostrophe for plural?
@Brian: Not a typo. Do the search I suggested; some of the returns are things like "the MacArthur candidacy", but about half are things like "when the MacArthur' checked in at the Waldorf-Astoria" and "she could remember the MacArthur' appearing for an officer's departure only once before".
May
30
comment Use of lone apostrophe for plural?
The apologetic apostrophe is interesting and possible, but I'm not sure about the plural form. According to that Wikipedia article, it's only the dual rather than the full plural that's the same as the singular, and the MacArthur' were a family of three.
May
30
awarded  Nice Question
May
30
comment Use of lone apostrophe for plural?
It's deliberate: he does this all over the place. Search for "the MacArthur" in this book in Google books for some examples.
May
30
asked Use of lone apostrophe for plural?
May
10
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Mar
31
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Sep
3
comment Origins and meaning of “can you not”
@FumbleFingers: The sarcastic meaning is different from a twisting of the usual meaning. You can't, for example, say "Can't you do that?" and mean the same as saying "can you not do that" sarcastically. You could, of course, say "Can't you do that?" sarcastically to mock someone for not being able to "do that", but that is not the same as what I described at all. The OP seems to be curious about "potential ambiguity", and my "answer" identifies one such.
Sep
2
comment Origins and meaning of “can you not”
@FumbleFingers: What's your point? I didn't say it was unusual.