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556133
bio website foxfirekitty.wordpress.com
location New England
age 37
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen 12 hours ago

Business systems analyst.


Jun
3
comment Usage of and equivalents of Sir
I'm in my thirties and live in the northeast US, and most people in my area use "sir", "ma'am", and "miss", especially with strangers. No one seems to think it's odd at all. Most people just seem to acknowledge it as politeness.
Jun
3
revised Is this an example of irony?
added emphasis
Jun
3
answered Is this an example of irony?
Jun
3
comment Is this an example of irony?
Ironical is an acceptable word.
Jun
3
comment Etymology of the color name “orange”
@Martin Beckett Pumpkins aren't common in Europe? Weird. They are about the easiest things to grow. But there you have it, I suppose: oranges came first. @Mitch I have no idea.
Jun
3
comment Does 'fall in with' always have a negative connotation?
Along the same lines as "fall into step with," I think. "I fell in with a bunch of programmer/linguist fetishists on the EL&U site" doesn't seem negative to me, but represents an appropriate usage.
Jun
3
comment Etymology of the color name “orange”
@Philoto Ah, yes, of course. But pumpkins grow more easily in the English speaking parts of Europe, I'd imagine, so I could have grown my own, but I would have had to buy oranges. What do you think? Maybe?
Jun
3
comment Etymology of the color name “orange”
@Otavio And pumpkins are less exotic than oranges. Or maybe because oranges are more exotic than pumpkins?
Jun
3
comment Etymology of the color name “orange”
I can't remember the exact article, but this is a summary of cognitive versus linguistic concepts for color that has some really interesting information. I think the article I'm thinking of is one of the referenced ones, but I don't have my old library on this computer.
Jun
3
comment Etymology of the color name “orange”
I think "orange" was just "yellow" before 1540. I used to study color vision and I remember one study about how to determine standard color sets in different cultures. I think it mentioned the introduction of "orange" into the English language by way of the fruit. I'll see if I can find it for you.
Jun
3
comment Are there any plans to extend the English alphabet
@Rhodri OMG, Mark Twain invented txtese?
Jun
3
comment How did Americans greet each other before “Hi”?
Good, good. Now we're on to something. Did you check "Howdy" and "How do ye" and "hail" as well?
Jun
3
revised Origin and exact meaning of the phrase “I have to go see a man about a dog”
removed excessive ellipses
Jun
3
comment Why “meth-”, “eth-”, “prop-”, when there is “uni-”,“di-”,“tri-”?
Not sure if you care, but the uni-, di-, and tri-, etc, work into the complex molecule nomenclature, to designate how many side groups of a particular type are on a chain. For instance, 18-bromo-12-butyl-11-chloro-4,8-diethyl-5-hydroxy-15-methoxytricos-6,13-dien-19-‌​yne-3,9-dione has two ethyl groups, two double carbon bonds, and two oxygen molecules.
Jun
3
comment How did Americans greet each other before “Hi”?
That's a pretty good demonstration, but are you sure it's "how do you do" as a greeting, and not "how do you do that thing you do," etc?
Jun
3
comment How did Americans greet each other before “Hi”?
That's a nice idea. Do you have any sources that support it?
Jun
3
comment How did Americans greet each other before “Hi”?
Thanks for demonstrating the British trend for "hello," and sharing your OED etymology too. It's not immediately relevant, but it does indicate that Etymology Online is probably way off-base in with its origin. Which means, of course, that this whole question is probably moot; if "hi" and "hello" predated the American colonies, then there was no time "before Americans said 'hi'."
Jun
3
comment How did Americans greet each other before “Hi”?
The problem with "greetings" is that you will have many instances of variations on "They exchanged greetings." The greeting itself might have been "Hey!" You'd have a similar problem with the other phrases, except for "howdy" and "hello" (unless there's some context I can't think of where these would not be used as interjections).
Jun
3
awarded  Good Question
Jun
3
comment How did Americans greet each other before “Hi”?
I appreciate the contribution, but "howdy" (as recorded by Etymonline) barely predates "hi" and there isn't anything to suggest that "hail" was commonly used in America (I know you disclaimed this, and I did find the note interesting, just not applicable).