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Jul
27
comment Who knocks at the door? Who does knock at the door?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it has been posted on ELL.SE, which it is better suited for.
Jul
27
comment Confused about vowel diagram (Vowel chart)! Can you clarify & explain how to read it?
I feel this question is more appropriate for Linguistics, since it is not specifically related to English pronunciation.
Jul
21
comment This is right. Or that is right?
@Tommy opinion questions are off-topic everywhere, I believe. That said, I believe also there is a canonical question on English.SE that addresses the "this/that" distinction.
Jul
10
comment What is a blanket term for a legal system based on evangelical Christian law?
I can't respond to comment flags directly, but so you know, there are not sufficient comments here for me to move the rest of the comment chain to the chat room. I think what's here is a sufficient teaser to get people to go to the chat room if they are interested in the discussion.
Jul
9
comment What's an expression for a cunningly-fake friend?
Foxes are not always underhanded.
Jul
9
comment Correct usage of semicolon?
I wouldn't use a colon or semi-colon. "My research focuses on pulsars, which are exotic remnants of dead stars." Or more scientific: "My research focuses on exotic remnants of dead stars, which are called 'quasars'." Those sentences express the idea more clearly and sound less chatty.
Jun
29
comment “Come out with your hands up… and something with coconut”
It's not so much that it is a silly shopping list, but rather that the cop is listing (silly) demands, rather than the criminal.
Jun
25
comment What do you call call a female philosopher?
@Tonepoet What are the gendered words for 'male nurse', 'male teacher', 'male daycare provider', or 'male secretary'? Men are just as capable of holding those jobs and nobody seems to be concerned that we need to be reminded of that. It's not about gendered terms. It's about marked versus unmarked.
Apr
27
comment A more elegant way of writing “attempt to replicate them” for Teaching Statement
Emulate is a more appropriate word here than replicate.
Mar
13
comment At Night or In the Night?
You may use your answer to correct the OP's statements, but please do not edit the question to change the OP's premise.
Mar
12
comment Confused: I have a tendency to begin sentences after semicolon by using verbs in the participle. What am I doing wrong?
@curious if you feel strongly about it, you could propose it on Meta.
Mar
12
comment Confused: I have a tendency to begin sentences after semicolon by using verbs in the participle. What am I doing wrong?
@curiousdannii We have lots of punctuation questions here.
Mar
10
comment Confused: I have a tendency to begin sentences after semicolon by using verbs in the participle. What am I doing wrong?
This isn't a question for Writers; it centers on how to appropriately use a semi-colon.
Mar
10
comment What is it called when words are deliberately spelled incorrectly but pronunciation is kept unchanged?
@Joe I edited your comment to include the edit you had made to the question. I think it is a valid point, but should be a comment and not an edit. Please flag this comment for mod attention if you want to discuss it, or flag this as obsolete if you are OK with the change.
Feb
13
comment Is there a term for when the moisture on the inside of your nose freezes when breathing in on a very cold day?
Nose freeze is what we call it, sometimes snot freeze. Not to be confused with snotcicle, which is when your snot freezes on the outside of your nose.
Feb
11
comment What is 'pink' and what is 'magenta'?
Seriously though. Even men wouldn't call violet and lilac pink. They are clearly in the purple category, similar to "grape" and "lavender" above.
Feb
11
comment What is 'pink' and what is 'magenta'?
Violet and lilac are shades of purple, not pink in the slightest.
Feb
11
comment Form of verb after a preposition
Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat.
Feb
3
comment Has “aught” survived in common usage?
@Qsigma I pronounce it /ɔːt/, more or less.
Feb
3
comment Has “aught” survived in common usage?
I live in Maine, and we do occasionally use aught else to mean nothing else: "He was standing in the driveway, shoveling snow in his socks and aught else. He had aught else to say in his own defense." I don't think I've seen it written thus, but it's part of our local dialect.