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location New England
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seen 5 hours ago

Business systems analyst.


11h
comment expressions using body parts
Not even the title? That's rather less than helpful, isn't it?
1d
comment “hereby referred to” or “hereafter referred to”?
We like for you to show your work. Please let us know where you checked the meanings of hereby and hereafter, what you found, and why you're not sure which to use.
1d
comment expressions using body parts
Which manuals of style? Do you have any citations?
1d
comment Is the phrase “has got” grammatically correct?
The character limits are there for a reason. Next time, please expound on your answer. We really do want to hear more about it.
1d
comment Can you further categorise 'Modern English'?
What are you asking here? What do you mean by array or decompose? If you asking what constitutes Modern English, you have a link in your question that answers that. If you aren't, then focus on communicating clearly rather than leveraging excessively florid vocabulary. It makes it sound like you are trying to show off, which makes your last statement sound like false modesty, not to mention that your word choices are less than stellar.
2d
comment What's another way to say
There is a reason for the word limit. Please improve this answer by explain your reasoning.
Jan
26
comment Meaning of “Back on their heels”
I removed the noise from the comments and edited the question to represent how I felt it ought have been edited in the first place.
Jan
14
comment Explode- Word Parts
etymonline.com/index.php?term=explode also if your school has access to the Oxford English Dictionary, that's an excellent source for word roots.
Jan
12
comment What is a “gilded shell” in Eliot's Wasteland?
@Fumble I'm not sure that it is obvious that "gilded shell" is a metaphor in this context.
Jan
12
comment What do you call snow that has collected between a car body and the tire?
The word limit exists for a reason, which is to encourage you to explain and support your answer. I realize that most of the answers are also slim, but they do include location information, for instance.
Jan
12
comment Do you know the meaning of the American idiom “pot calling the kettle black”?
@Mari-LouA Heh. I guess I was looking at the edit date. I did think it sounded familiar...
Jan
12
comment Do you know the meaning of the American idiom “pot calling the kettle black”?
@Mari-LouA I still feel it's off-topic as worded. There are 3 reopen votes though; you might consider raising this on Meta.
Jan
11
comment Do you know the meaning of the American idiom “pot calling the kettle black”?
@Mari-LouA I agree with Reg. This is a survey with no definable "correct" answer. That makes it off-topic.
Jan
11
comment What adjective do you call anything that can anticipate any input?
You should probably clarify that "idiot-proof" is your answer then.
Jan
9
comment What adjective do you call anything that can anticipate any input?
Are you suggesting idiot-proof-able? If so, please make that clearer.
Jan
5
comment A number between 0 and 1 - like a percentage but expressed as a decimal
Ratio might also be appropriate.
Jan
2
comment How do you refer to a 'they' character in a poem in a possessive sense?
I wonder if it would help you to capitalize 'They' so that it feel more like a named entity, which I think is what your prof is getting at by suggesting that you treat it like 'I' is treated in literary criticism. Basically, treat it as though 'They' is the same as 'Bob'. It's the name of a thing, not a referent.
Jan
2
comment a nonrestrictive appositive with a restrictive clause
Is this meant to be an edit of your original question?
Dec
25
comment What does “yo-ho-ho” mean?
@malvolio Yargh, that I shall. Many thanks to you.
Dec
21
comment How do I address an envelope to a married couple, who are respectively Professor and Dr?
I imagine it's official title (Princess), then degree (Reverend), then rank (Professor), then gendered term (Mrs), so you'd address it as Dr and Professor or Dr and Mr, as a degree outweighs a rank and should be listed first. If they share a surname, you might avoid it altogether by using The Stones, The Stone Family, or House Stone. I have no reference for this guess, alas.