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17h
comment What is the adjective counterpart for the word correspond? Is it “correspondial”, as in “Our relationship is only corresponial for now.”
I suppose you could call it an epistolary relationship.
17h
comment “Come out with your hands up… and something with coconut”
It's not so much that it is a silly shopping list, but rather that the cop is listing (silly) demands, rather than the criminal.
Jun
25
comment What do you call call a female philosopher?
@Tonepoet What are the gendered words for 'male nurse', 'male teacher', 'male daycare provider', or 'male secretary'? Men are just as capable of holding those jobs and nobody seems to be concerned that we need to be reminded of that. It's not about gendered terms. It's about marked versus unmarked.
Apr
27
comment A more elegant way of writing “attempt to replicate them” for Teaching Statement
Emulate is a more appropriate word here than replicate.
Mar
13
comment At Night or In the Night?
You may use your answer to correct the OP's statements, but please do not edit the question to change the OP's premise.
Mar
12
comment Confused: I have a tendency to begin sentences after semicolon by using verbs in the participle. What am I doing wrong?
@curious if you feel strongly about it, you could propose it on Meta.
Mar
12
comment Confused: I have a tendency to begin sentences after semicolon by using verbs in the participle. What am I doing wrong?
@curiousdannii We have lots of punctuation questions here.
Mar
10
comment Confused: I have a tendency to begin sentences after semicolon by using verbs in the participle. What am I doing wrong?
This isn't a question for Writers; it centers on how to appropriately use a semi-colon.
Mar
10
comment What is it called when words are deliberately spelled incorrectly but pronunciation is kept unchanged?
@Joe I edited your comment to include the edit you had made to the question. I think it is a valid point, but should be a comment and not an edit. Please flag this comment for mod attention if you want to discuss it, or flag this as obsolete if you are OK with the change.
Feb
13
comment Is there a term for when the moisture on the inside of your nose freezes when breathing in on a very cold day?
Nose freeze is what we call it, sometimes snot freeze. Not to be confused with snotcicle, which is when your snot freezes on the outside of your nose.
Feb
11
comment What is 'pink' and what is 'magenta'?
Seriously though. Even men wouldn't call violet and lilac pink. They are clearly in the purple category, similar to "grape" and "lavender" above.
Feb
11
comment What is 'pink' and what is 'magenta'?
Violet and lilac are shades of purple, not pink in the slightest.
Feb
11
comment Form of verb after a preposition
Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat.
Feb
3
comment Has “aught” survived in common usage?
@Qsigma I pronounce it /ɔːt/, more or less.
Feb
3
comment Has “aught” survived in common usage?
I live in Maine, and we do occasionally use aught else to mean nothing else: "He was standing in the driveway, shoveling snow in his socks and aught else. He had aught else to say in his own defense." I don't think I've seen it written thus, but it's part of our local dialect.
Jan
28
comment Is the phrase “has got” grammatically correct?
The character limits are there for a reason. Next time, please expound on your answer. We really do want to hear more about it.
Jan
26
comment Meaning of “Back on their heels”
I removed the noise from the comments and edited the question to represent how I felt it ought have been edited in the first place.
Jan
14
comment Explode- Word Parts
etymonline.com/index.php?term=explode also if your school has access to the Oxford English Dictionary, that's an excellent source for word roots.
Jan
12
comment What is a “gilded shell” in Eliot's Wasteland?
@Fumble I'm not sure that it is obvious that "gilded shell" is a metaphor in this context.
Jan
12
comment Do you know the meaning of the American idiom “pot calling the kettle black”?
@Mari-LouA Heh. I guess I was looking at the edit date. I did think it sounded familiar...