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Jan
12
comment Do you know the meaning of the American idiom “pot calling the kettle black”?
@Mari-LouA I still feel it's off-topic as worded. There are 3 reopen votes though; you might consider raising this on Meta.
Jan
11
comment Do you know the meaning of the American idiom “pot calling the kettle black”?
@Mari-LouA I agree with Reg. This is a survey with no definable "correct" answer. That makes it off-topic.
Jan
11
comment What adjective do you call anything that can anticipate any input?
You should probably clarify that "idiot-proof" is your answer then.
Jan
10
awarded  Famous Question
Jan
9
comment What adjective do you call anything that can anticipate any input?
Are you suggesting idiot-proof-able? If so, please make that clearer.
Jan
8
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
7
revised Is the “female” in “female cousin” redundant here?
incorporated relevant information from a comment
Jan
5
comment A number between 0 and 1 - like a percentage but expressed as a decimal
Ratio might also be appropriate.
Jan
4
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
2
comment How do you refer to a 'they' character in a poem in a possessive sense?
I wonder if it would help you to capitalize 'They' so that it feel more like a named entity, which I think is what your prof is getting at by suggesting that you treat it like 'I' is treated in literary criticism. Basically, treat it as though 'They' is the same as 'Bob'. It's the name of a thing, not a referent.
Jan
2
reviewed Approve How do you refer to a 'they' character in a poem in a possessive sense?
Jan
2
comment a nonrestrictive appositive with a restrictive clause
Is this meant to be an edit of your original question?
Dec
25
comment What does “yo-ho-ho” mean?
@malvolio Yargh, that I shall. Many thanks to you.
Dec
24
revised Till death do WE part
added 201 characters in body
Dec
21
comment How do I address an envelope to a married couple, who are respectively Professor and Dr?
I imagine it's official title (Princess), then degree (Reverend), then rank (Professor), then gendered term (Mrs), so you'd address it as Dr and Professor or Dr and Mr, as a degree outweighs a rank and should be listed first. If they share a surname, you might avoid it altogether by using The Stones, The Stone Family, or House Stone. I have no reference for this guess, alas.
Dec
19
comment Does “last July” refer to July 2013 or July 2014?
I think you're the only one who can answer the question of what you are referring to. Perhaps you mean to ask what the listener is most likely to infer?
Dec
8
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
7
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
5
awarded  Famous Question
Dec
1
revised Polite name for a prostitute
removed slut shaming bit