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Jan
28
revised expressions using body parts
rolled back to a previous revision
Jan
28
revised Putative should - what time does it express?
removed the speculation about the French language that was marked as offensive to francophones.
Jan
28
comment Is the phrase “has got” grammatically correct?
The character limits are there for a reason. Next time, please expound on your answer. We really do want to hear more about it.
Jan
28
revised What's the grammar behind “let read”?
deleted 1 character in body
Jan
26
comment Meaning of “Back on their heels”
I removed the noise from the comments and edited the question to represent how I felt it ought have been edited in the first place.
Jan
26
revised Meaning of “Back on their heels”
incorporated reference from comments, added timestamp to make link more useful
Jan
15
revised Need a word for “Unravel in the worst possible way”
added 135 characters in body
Jan
14
revised Explode- Word Parts
edited tags
Jan
14
comment Explode- Word Parts
etymonline.com/index.php?term=explode also if your school has access to the Oxford English Dictionary, that's an excellent source for word roots.
Jan
14
revised meaning of 'under the fedora'
edited tags
Jan
14
answered meaning of 'under the fedora'
Jan
12
comment What is a “gilded shell” in Eliot's Wasteland?
@Fumble I'm not sure that it is obvious that "gilded shell" is a metaphor in this context.
Jan
12
comment Do you know the meaning of the American idiom “pot calling the kettle black”?
@Mari-LouA Heh. I guess I was looking at the edit date. I did think it sounded familiar...
Jan
12
comment Do you know the meaning of the American idiom “pot calling the kettle black”?
@Mari-LouA I still feel it's off-topic as worded. There are 3 reopen votes though; you might consider raising this on Meta.
Jan
11
comment Do you know the meaning of the American idiom “pot calling the kettle black”?
@Mari-LouA I agree with Reg. This is a survey with no definable "correct" answer. That makes it off-topic.
Jan
11
comment What adjective do you call anything that can anticipate any input?
You should probably clarify that "idiot-proof" is your answer then.
Jan
10
awarded  Famous Question
Jan
9
comment What adjective do you call anything that can anticipate any input?
Are you suggesting idiot-proof-able? If so, please make that clearer.
Jan
8
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
7
revised Is the “female” in “female cousin” redundant here?
incorporated relevant information from a comment