Reputation
Next tag badge:
471/400 score
72/80 answers
Badges
15 78 162
Impact
~2.2m people reached

Dec
29
answered Single word for old and many-times-seen content
Dec
27
answered Describe the Colour of Raw Liver
Dec
26
comment Why “a UAE offical” and not “an UAE official”?
@Edwin Thanks for the note on the downvote. I left my answer because the question is a duplicate of both the canonical indefinite article and indefinite article before acronyms questions and I wanted to make sure the OP understood why both those posts were linked here (as well as the particular other duplicate that I included).
Dec
25
comment Why “a UAE offical” and not “an UAE official”?
I added the "uniform" question as a duplicate because it is very similar, even though it is itself a duplicate of the canonical "a/an" question.
Dec
25
answered Why “a UAE offical” and not “an UAE official”?
Dec
25
reviewed Approve Does “end in” include the date?
Dec
23
reviewed Approve A phrase for “repeatedly shaking one's leg up and down when idle”
Dec
23
comment Why is Saturday “day of Saturn”?
Because the day of Frey is the day before Saturn's day.
Dec
22
comment What is the origin of the phrase “Eastern Seaboard”?
@TomAu Thank you,
Dec
22
awarded  Famous Question
Dec
22
comment What is the origin of the phrase “Eastern Seaboard”?
You're claiming that Maine doesn't face the Atlantic? As a native of the state, I'd like to point out that we have more coastline than California.
Dec
21
awarded  Guru
Dec
20
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
20
comment What is the English word for the role of a person who betrays his master's attitudes?
I'm not sure if I understand completely. Is the implication that you can judge a master by his minions?
Dec
20
revised Much and many: the opposite of less - fewer debate?
added links
Dec
20
comment Much and many: the opposite of less - fewer debate?
@David I didn't ask what they mean. In fact, I defined it in my question. I'm asking about usage.
Dec
20
comment Much and many: the opposite of less - fewer debate?
Continuous = noncount, discrete = count, if that helps. Different words, same concept. Comes from a math background. This doesn't answer my question though.
Dec
20
comment Is “Am I needing to. . . ?” grammatical?
Of English grammar.
Dec
20
comment Is “Am I needing to. . . ?” grammatical?
I think that there are books on grammar that are considered authoritative sources of information. There is an entire field of study dedicated to studying various English grammars. I don't think it can be argued that this is a personal opinion.
Dec
20
answered What is the word for doing an act and not knowing you're doing it until its done?