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Aug
15
comment Is there an American English equivalent of the British idiom “carrying coals to Newcastle”?
@JPmiaou I'm from New England and I have never heard it before.
Aug
15
comment Is there an American English equivalent of the British idiom “carrying coals to Newcastle”?
I disagree. Herding cats is an utterly pointless exercise precisely because it is impossible.
Aug
15
answered Is there an American English equivalent of the British idiom “carrying coals to Newcastle”?
Aug
15
comment What do you call someone looking for a job?
"Unemployed" ;-)
Aug
15
comment Difference between female and male usage
@Robusto Especially considering that there could be huge differences in vowel content between Russian and Swedish.
Aug
15
answered What is the expression for coughing at the beginning of an utterance officially called?
Aug
15
comment What is the expression for coughing at the beginning of an utterance officially called?
These posts about the use of fillers and hedges may be of interest to you.
Aug
15
comment Use of “f ” instead of “s” in historic, printed English documents
I had wondered about this myself. I didn't know there was a name for this type of s, and that it was common in other languages too. How fascinating.
Aug
15
revised Use of “f ” instead of “s” in historic, printed English documents
retagged and clarified title
Aug
15
revised Origin of “continental breakfast”
changed hyphens to emdash
Aug
15
awarded  Excavator
Aug
15
comment Origin of “continental breakfast”
This is funny, but it should really be a comment.
Aug
15
comment Is ‘Political gold’ a cliché or just a compound noun?
Comedy gold is a relative common, modern phrase that is similar in concept. I believe the phrase was popularized by Seinfeld.
Aug
15
answered What's a gay transsexual woman?
Aug
15
comment What's a gay transsexual woman?
People don't "turn gay." I think you probably mean "realize that they are gay."
Aug
14
comment “Purge” vs. “expunge”
+1 I think this answer is quite good, but how about you take a smaller selection of example definitions, since you sum it up so nicely?
Aug
14
comment Words that can be repeated and still make sense
@PLL I see your point about this question differing from the linked duplicates. However, I personally think this question should remain closed because it is too open-ended to be on-topic.
Aug
13
comment Words that can be repeated and still make sense
Hello and thanks for your good question! It is such a good question, it has been asked before, so your question has been closed as a duplicate. If you read that post and still don't feel that your question has been answered, then please feel free to edit this question to reflect what part of the answer in the duplicate you find confusing. If you have questions about why your post was closed, please leave a comment here or ask on Meta.
Aug
12
revised Express an ability not to do something
Removed (unnecessary) apologies and clarified language
Aug
9
comment When using complete sentences in parenthetical e.g. or i.e. situations, should the first word be capitalized?
possible duplicate of Can I start a sentence with "i.e."?