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May
16
comment What is the difference between “equal” and “equitable”?
I agree with this. I'm not sure if one can apply the concept of fairness with respect to cell nuclei.
May
16
answered What is the correct word for “dependee”?
May
12
comment Do 'stay on the list', 'make the list' and 'make the cut' all have the same meaning?
I'd say that in this context, Robusto is correct. However, before someone can be cut from the list, he has to have first made an earlier version of the list, at least in theory. So, to "make the cut", would imply that you've been on at least two versions of the list, but to "make the list" might only mean you've only been on one version. And, you might not "make the cut" for the next version!
May
12
comment Why do English writers avoid explicit numerals?
@DisgruntledGoat Except on clocks: ubr.com/clocks/frequently-asked-questions-faq/…
May
12
comment “Whereäs” as an alternative spelling of “whereas”
@Rahul The New Yorker would not approve of you boldly splitting infinitives, although I'm sure Captain Kirk would. ;)
May
12
comment “Synced” or “synched”
Which dictionary is "the" dictionary? Because they are in some dictionaries.
May
12
comment Which is the proper spelling: “disfunction” or “dysfunction”?
@Third Idiot: isn't common usage often used as a proxy for correctness? That's the most common argument I've heard about why it's acceptable to end a sentence with a proposition.
May
12
comment Was what happened to the pronunciation of the word “church”, as compared to the Scots-English “kirk”, a general phenomenon in Middle English?
The German aspect is immediately what leapt to my mind. One can imagine the "ch" making something resembling a "k" sound, but it eventually becoming pronounced with the "ch" sound we're more familiar with.
May
11
comment How do you quote a passage that has used '[sic]' mistakenly?
I've seen many places where [sic] is used to mean exactly what you say, i.e., that this is exactly as quoted, and not to suggest any error. Unfortunately, because the most common reason for doing that is for a spelling or grammar error, people are under the misapprehension that is what [sic] actually means.
May
9
awarded  Supporter
May
9
awarded  Autobiographer