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Jul
11
comment Where/when did the *idea* of bad words come from in English?
Your Dong citation reminded me of this YouTube video: youtube.com/watch?v=sHcfGJ5SwCA (warning: video contains excessive use of the word in question).
Jun
28
comment How should a date be written?
Note that 2010-06-05 is not ambiguous (as far as I know), whereas 06-05-2010 is (as per the US/UK distinction you've already highlighted).
Jun
28
answered The louder he talked of his honor, the faster we counted our spoons
Jun
28
comment Is “Sheath” the right word for describing exterior covering of the plane?
@Joe Blow. No, the fuselage is not the same thing as the skin. However, it might be the word he's looking for.
Jun
28
answered Seconds has/have passed
Jun
28
comment Look who's talking
@KeithS: it is different from the former expression, but I think it also reflects this part from the question: "He's talking about this deed as a wrong one but he certainly does it too."
Jun
28
answered Look who's talking
Jun
28
answered Is “Sheath” the right word for describing exterior covering of the plane?
Jun
28
comment Throw away/in/out for rubbish?
@Colin Fine: I wasn't intending to make any such distinction. Instead, I was pointing out that in avilella's question, he used the sentence form "Don't throw them [in] (the rubbish bin)". In that particular form, in is valid. He did not specify how the verb should be delineated.
Jun
27
answered Attorney at law, is there any other kind?
Jun
27
comment “Checked into the database” versus “checked in to the database”
@RegDwight: good point. I did a quick Google search with "check in to a hotel", and it responded with, "Did you mean 'check into a hotel'?" Thus sayeth Google. (Not that this proves anything, of course.)
Jun
27
comment “Checked into the database” versus “checked in to the database”
I hadn't considered these other, even more abstract, concepts. The important thing, I think, is that after being "brought into" those things, it makes sense at a conceptual level of "being inside" those things. Not so much with turning a wallet "in to" a policeman.
Jun
27
answered “Checked into the database” versus “checked in to the database”
Jun
27
comment Throw away/in/out for rubbish?
I disagree that "throw in" always means to give up. You can throw your trash in a trash can, for example, or in sentence form matching avilella's question, "Don't throw them in the rubbish bin". A subtle difference might be that when you throw something in a rubbish bin, you could still pull it out, but when something's been thrown away or out, it is more likely to be irretrievable.
Jun
27
comment Where should the period be put when an entire sentence is quoted at the end of a sentence?
as Urbycoz points out, this is only correct for US English.
Jun
27
comment What is the origin of being in “hot water”?
Although I'll respectfully disagree about the fruitlessness of speculation, I agree that none of the answers adequately address the "in" part of "in hot water". (I also have a similar mental image as you, while sharing your concern that such an image is unlikely to have been available in the 15th or 16th century.)
Jun
21
comment No loitering sign: “Police Take Notice”
I think it's arguable whether a comma is missing, but what's not arguable is that signs frequently omit punctuation, just as they typically use all uppercase letters. telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/6046862/…
Jun
21
comment What would you call the object of an activity one does for fun?
How about "n't work", as in "I didn't work last weekend"? ;)
Jun
17
comment Where does the term “tuck shop” come from?
Wikipedia agrees with you: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuck_shop
Jun
16
comment “X times as many as” or “X times more than”
I think you should just use overwhelming force to take the sweets from Jack and John. Then, unambiguously, Jack has 0 times more sweets than John. As a bonus, you now have plenty of sweets of your own.