959 reputation
410
bio website cs.virginia.edu/~abh2n
location Charlottesville, VA
age 44
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Jul 21 at 11:40

I am a Principal Scientist at Dependable Computing in Charlottesville, VA, where we work on safety case engineering, formal specifications, requirements gathering, and other safety-critical and security-critical software engineering issues. I have a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Virginia, with my dissertation involving a genetic algorithm exploration of neural network models of the hippocampus. I've also previously earned Masters degrees in Physics/Astronomy (involving General Relativity) and Computer Science (involving improving multi-processor implementations of hippocampal neural network simulations).


Jun
27
comment Throw away/in/out for rubbish?
I disagree that "throw in" always means to give up. You can throw your trash in a trash can, for example, or in sentence form matching avilella's question, "Don't throw them in the rubbish bin". A subtle difference might be that when you throw something in a rubbish bin, you could still pull it out, but when something's been thrown away or out, it is more likely to be irretrievable.
Jun
27
comment Where should the period be put when an entire sentence is quoted at the end of a sentence?
as Urbycoz points out, this is only correct for US English.
Jun
27
comment What is the origin of being in “hot water”?
Although I'll respectfully disagree about the fruitlessness of speculation, I agree that none of the answers adequately address the "in" part of "in hot water". (I also have a similar mental image as you, while sharing your concern that such an image is unlikely to have been available in the 15th or 16th century.)
Jun
21
comment No loitering sign: “Police Take Notice”
I think it's arguable whether a comma is missing, but what's not arguable is that signs frequently omit punctuation, just as they typically use all uppercase letters. telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/6046862/…
Jun
21
comment What would you call the object of an activity one does for fun?
How about "n't work", as in "I didn't work last weekend"? ;)
Jun
17
comment Where does the term “tuck shop” come from?
Wikipedia agrees with you: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuck_shop
Jun
16
comment “X times as many as” or “X times more than”
I think you should just use overwhelming force to take the sweets from Jack and John. Then, unambiguously, Jack has 0 times more sweets than John. As a bonus, you now have plenty of sweets of your own.
Jun
7
comment What would you call a person who doesn't want to learn anything new?
I often consider myself to be a bit of a philistine as I have what many consider "common" tastes (e.g., I prefer Dr. Pepper over a fine wine and action movies over art house movies), but I also enjoy learning new things. I think there might be a significant overlap, but I wouldn't think that philistines would necessarily be against learning new things. Also, it's interesting to me to note the contradiction between your first and second definitions. In the first one, the philistine is smug (which I don't consider part of the definition), whereas in the second one they're inferior.
Jun
1
awarded  Critic
Jun
1
comment Grease quote explanation “Pinkslips ownership papers?”
@PimPumPunk "Pink slips" also refer to the documents, as the word "slip" just means a piece of paper.
May
31
comment What is the name for this “…” punctuation?
FWIW, on the (standard) Mac keyboard, you can generate an … with [alt]+";".
May
26
comment How to properly write sentence with double words
@Boob, how about "For a long time, this is what I've been looking for"? (See english.stackexchange.com/questions/27152/…) Of course, now that's ending a sentence with a preposition, but I assume no one here has any qualms with that...
May
26
comment What is the opposite of the “sub” prefix?
@Philoto, I did not mean to imply that subclasses and superclasses were subcategories and supercategories, merely that they followed the same pattern as subscript/superscript that @Third Idiot gave.
May
26
comment What is the opposite of the “sub” prefix?
And for those of us in Computer Science, subclasses and superclasses. journals.ecs.soton.ac.uk/java/tutorial/java/javaOO/…
May
20
comment How to ask for a name of some thing?
After reading Ben Jackon's comment on my answer, I concur with FumbleFingers.
May
20
awarded  Nice Answer
May
19
answered How to ask for a name of some thing?
May
19
comment Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray: “I wonder will you understand me?”
@Matthew Read: I wouldn't think it should be in quotes. He's not quoting anyone. (Not that this is the only reason to put something in quotes, but I can't think of any reason why that phrase should be in quotes.)
May
19
answered Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray: “I wonder will you understand me?”
May
18
comment Is it alright to use lowercase “i” or should you always use “I” (uppercase)?
@malach: I thought that Sie was still capitalized (when referring to you, not they).