Reputation
1,131
Top tag
Next privilege 2,000 Rep.
Edit questions and answers
Badges
5 11
Newest
 Student
Impact
~53k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 169 votes cast
1d
comment Adjective meaning “greater than one”
@chaslyfromUK, added that to the question
1d
revised Adjective meaning “greater than one”
Added examples of other terminology.
2d
revised Adjective meaning “greater than one”
Fixed spelling
2d
comment Adjective meaning “greater than one”
Plural is good in some situations, but I will clarify my answer to include that I'm looking for an answer that works with uncountable quantities.
2d
awarded  Student
2d
comment Adjective meaning “greater than one”
@SamuelVimes, not stupid, and better than "Antecedent: Factor Greater Than One", but not quite as good as I'm hoping for.
2d
comment Adjective meaning “greater than one”
@HotLicks, added an example to the question
2d
revised Adjective meaning “greater than one”
Added example
2d
asked Adjective meaning “greater than one”
Jul
29
comment Is “pretty ugly” an oxymoron?
@Karasinsky, I think that your answer would be improved by adding that information. As I've mentioned below, I definitely appreciate the difference between true contradiction and apparent contradiction, or even "apparent only if you squint your eyes and shake your head" contradiction. (As in, the contradictions are only "apparent" if you kinda sorta force it.)
Jul
24
comment Is “pretty ugly” an oxymoron?
@rogermue, are you suggesting I follow the advice of Lewis Carroll's Humpty Dumpty? goodreads.com/quotes/…
Jul
24
comment Is “pretty ugly” an oxymoron?
@rogermue, it would only be time-consuming to find such an example if such an example were time-consuming to find (tautology). It sounds like you're admitting that to be the case then, which only bolsters my point that the vast majority of lists (and it's easy to find lists of oxymorons) do not respect the distinction between "false" and "true" oxymorons.
Jul
23
comment Is “pretty ugly” an oxymoron?
rogermue, to be clear, I completely understand the distinction you're making, as does @Spork. We're not disagreeing that such a distinction can be made. Nor do we disagree that such a distinction is useful. Merely, it's that I cannot find an authoritative source that makes that distinction. Can you? I would like to see such a source, because I truly believe the distinction that you (and many, many others) have made is useful, I just don't see it supported by usage, either formal or informal.
Jul
23
comment Is “pretty ugly” an oxymoron?
@rogermue, it's easy to dismiss individual examples as "things on the internet", but I've also mentioned textbooks from more than 30 years ago with "pretty ugly" as an example. And, do you not find it interesting that both answers here cite single sources, both of which contradict their points? I.e., both sites cited for the two answers either directly include "pretty ugly" or they include something similar (e.g., "awfully pretty"). Can you find a site other than Wikipedia that does not? (Note that the Wikipedia site used to include it.)
Jul
23
comment Is “pretty ugly” an oxymoron?
@Karasinsky, there are several lists of oxymorons out there, both on-line and off. I know that in my high-school textbook, "pretty ugly" was listed as an oxymoron. Now, having taught high-school physics myself, I know that high-school textbooks have errors in them. However, I also see "pretty ugly" in all but two of the lists of oxymorons I have found, one of which includes "awfully pretty" which falls into the same category. So, other than the Wikipedia list (which used to have it, until an editor removed it), can you locate a list of oxymorons without it or similar oxymorons?
Jul
23
comment Is “pretty ugly” an oxymoron?
@rogermue, the site you provide lists "awfully pretty" as an example of an oxymoron. How does that usage differ from "pretty ugly"?
Jul
17
comment Is “pretty ugly” an oxymoron?
@Robusto, then how can the majority of people be wrong about a technical classification under that framework?
Jul
17
comment Is “pretty ugly” an oxymoron?
@Robusto, on the contrary, I'm saying that descriptivism posits that the technical classification of a term is defined by how it is actually used. I'm surprised I need to clarify this at this site, but here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linguistic_description Also, it's perfectly acceptable to end a sentence with a preposition or to boldly split an infinitive.
Jul
16
comment Single word for kingliness and manliness
@vladkornea, I think it's not just an exception, but the exception
Jul
16
comment Single word for kingliness and manliness
@vladkornea, King Maria Theresa of Austria would disagree with that definition. From newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Maria_Theresa_of_Austria "Maria Theresa was actually proclaimed King, rather than Queen, of Hungary upon her ascension to the Hungarian throne."