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2d
comment Does “reinventing the wheel” have negative or positive connotation?
@user21497, Weird, couldn't find that quote. Where did you get it from?
2d
comment Does “reinventing the wheel” have negative or positive connotation?
@this.lau_, "reinventing" can be used to mean a good thing. Like "reinventing email".
2d
comment Does “reinventing the wheel” have negative or positive connotation?
@SF., Isn't "A week spent in the laboratory can save you from good two hours of visit to the library." upside-down?
Apr
23
comment “click on the image” vs. “click the image”
The reasoning sounds good, Buuuuuuuuuut Merriam Webster lists it as a transitive verb. Same goes for other "major" dictionaries. What gives? Is rogermue (below) on the right track?
Apr
18
comment Does “is potentially faster” imply “is not slower”?
It's not a weasel-word when the circumstances have been clearly stated. It's only a weasel-word when the circumstances are vague or not mentioned at all.
Apr
18
comment Does “is potentially faster” imply “is not slower”?
Since the "someone" in the question is referring to me, I'd thought I'd chipped in: Yes, the first point would be accurate, re: "In some circumstances we know about (for example, in the circumstance that the code is optimized for both X and Y), X is faster. In other circumstances we know about, it is the same speed, or slower."
Apr
11
comment What differentiates an abstract noun with a concrete noun?
@FumbleFingers, I don't quite get you since I've already said that in the previous comment: There seems to be usages in computational linguistics, so the distinction is important in some ways.
Apr
11
comment What differentiates an abstract noun with a concrete noun?
@kiamlaluno, So is "dance" an abstract or concrete noun? What you perceive with your sense are the "movements and steps", but isn't "dance" abstract just like "democracy"?
Apr
11
comment What differentiates an abstract noun with a concrete noun?
@FumbleFingers, Regarding "a bit facile by today's standards", I'd beg to differ. There seems to be usages in en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computational_linguistics
Mar
12
comment Ending a note with “Thanks regardless”?
@LightnessRacesinOrbit, The meaning of mononyms are usually pretty unmeaningful. But "lightness races in orbit" is made up of 4 English words.
Mar
12
comment Word for person who loves to share knowledge
Doesn't fountainhead mean "source"?
Mar
12
comment Word for person who loves to share knowledge
I'd think pundit has a derogatory meaning.
Mar
10
comment Ending a note with “Thanks regardless”?
@LightnessRacesinOrbit, What is "lightness races in orbit" supposed to mean anyway?
Mar
8
comment Can “thanks in advance” be considered rude?
@AdamRobinson, That's rude since its bordering on fake politeness....
Mar
8
comment Can “thanks in advance” be considered rude?
@FumbleFingers, meta.stackexchange.com/a/98153/159916
Feb
28
comment What Is the Real Name of the #?
@medica, worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/ww-oct1.htm "With all these terms about, inventing a new one, especially such an odd-ball one as octothorpe, would seem to serve no practical purpose"
Feb
26
comment What is the English equivalent to the Chinese/Japanese saying, “塞翁失馬— Life is like Old Sai’s horse”?
This should be the accepted answer.
Feb
26
comment Word for person willing to argue contradictory things depending on what suits him
This is a better answer. Why don't you accept this as answer?
Feb
26
comment Word for person willing to argue contradictory things depending on what suits him
@bib, I don't think "advocate" is a good adjective for "someone who has no qualms saying something is good/bad despite what he really thinks, if it's beneficial for him to do so".
Feb
26
comment How many adjectives can be chained without sounding weird?
@rraallvv, Link down.